first_imgPunjab Cabinet Minister Navjot Singh Sidhu on Monday accused former Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal and his son Sukhbir Badal of siphoning off over ₹2,000 crore of funds under Smart City project and Amrut scheme. He also alleged that the Badal duo have “put the money into their accounts by diverting State funds”. With the money meant for urban development being “misused” by the previous SAD-BJP government, Mr Sidhu said the Centre has now refused to give a single penny to Punjab for the Smart City project. Asking them to tell the people where they had spent the funds, he said Badals, who used to boast about the State’s development, carried out the same “only in newspapers”. ”…the money meant for some purpose directly went to the (Badal) family. Money which used to come in the State for some purpose, Badal and his son diverted it and put it into their accounts,” he alleged. The Local Body Minister in the Amarinder Singh government also alleged that the previous dispensation contributed only ₹32 crore as theState’s share for Smart City project for Ludhiana as against ₹200 crore. The Centre had sent ₹200 crore. “By spending ₹32 crore, balance ₹168 crore was still pending. There is no information about ₹168 crore,” he told reporters. “You (Badals) misused the money. The money meant for smart city was spent somewhere else,” he alleged and added “my only question is where is the money, they should tell.” Mr Sidhu said that the Centre has refused to give money to Punjab for smart city projects after it noticed “misuse of funds.” ‘Destroyed Punjab’Attacking Parkash Singh Badal, Mr Sidhu said, “He called himself as ‘Vikas purash’ There is no one bigger than him who destroyed the State.”last_img read more

first_imgPANAJI: The Goa Congress on Sunday attacked State Minister for Agriculture and Goa Forward Party (GFP) chief Vijai Sardesai, asking him to clarify his stand on the cattle slaughter ban.The GFP is part of the Bharatiya Janata Party-led government in the State. All India Congress Committee (AICC) secretary Girish Chodankar said that Mr. Sardesai’s assurance that the State government would write to the Centre about its concerns over the notification was a mockery, as the beef ban was the creation of the NDA government. “What people are expecting is action and not hollow demands or lip service through media,” Mr. Chodankar said.He added that Mr. Sardesai was not in the Opposition, but was a part of the government in Goa and at the Centre.He asked Mr. Sardesai to clarify where he stood in the debate instead of making futile attempts to regain the sympathy of the minority community.“Mr Sardesai should either support the BJP’s agenda or openly or withdraw his support to the Government, instead of playing with sentiments of the peace-loving people of Goa. Citizens of Goa have sent home such people in the past, and will repeat the same when required,” he said.The AICC secretary said that following the inflammatory remarks made by Sadhvi Saraswati, the State government should have filed an FIR against her and arrested her before she left the State, instead of issuing statements as a smokescreen for her to escape the law.last_img read more

first_imgThe political crisis in Bihar deepened on Saturday with Deputy Chief Minister Tejaswi Yadav, facing CBI charges, skipping a government function attended by Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, who swapped his chair with a JD(U) Minister after being seated next to a Rashtriya Janata Dal leader.The organisers initially covered the nameplate of Tejaswi, the special guest at the function whose seat was next to the Chief Minister’s, but later removed it. The function was held to mark the World Youth Skills Day.Swapping chairsMr. Kumar, who was seated next to Labour Resources Minister and RJD leader Vijay Prakash, subsequently swapped his chair with JD(U) Minister Rajiv Ranjan Singh, who was on his right. This was seen as an attempt by the Chief Minister to maintain a distance with the RJD Minister.The episode, which was captured in still as well as video cameras of the electronic media, gave an indication of how the acrimony between the two grand alliance partners was growing with every passing day in the wake of the CBI registering an FIR against Tejaswi and others in connection with a land-for hotels scam case.When presspersons asked the Chief Minister about Mr. Tejaswi skipping the function, he smiled and extended skill day greetings to them.last_img read more

first_imgA nine-year-old boy and a teenage girl were today killed while nine other civilians injured as Pakistani troops opened fire and lobbed mortars at dozens of villages and posts along the Line of Control in Poonch district of Jammu and Kashmir.Indian troops guarding the border effectively retaliated, a police spokesman said.The spokesman said Pakistani troops resorted to unprovoked and heavy firing and shelling from across the border in Dhigwar, Kerni and Shahpur sectors around 0650 hours.A nine-year-old boy and 15-year-old girl were killed and nine other civilians were injured in the Pakistani firing targeting different villages, he said.The deceased have been identified as Asrar Ahmad of Mohallha Qasba and Yasmeen Akhtar of Kerma village of Dighwar.The condition of three of the injured was stated to be “critical”.The critically injured persons were referred to the Government Medical College Hospital here for specialised treatment, the spokesman said.The firing and shelling by Pakistan sparked panic among border residents.The year 2017 has seen a sharp increase in ceasefire violations by Pakistan.Till August 1, there were 285 violations by Pakistani forces while in 2016, the number was significantly less at 228 for the entire year, according to Army figures.last_img read more

first_imgThe State Bharatiya Janata Party on Thursday alleged that Bangladeshi goons hired by the ruling CPI(M) attacked its supporters picketing in Boxanagar in Sepahijala district during the Tripura bandh called by the party in protest against the killing of senior journalist Sudip Datta Bhowmik.“The unprovoked attack left nine of our supporters injured. Three of them were shifted to G.B. Hospital here after their condition deteriorated,” State BJP president Biplab said Kumar Deb.The BJP had called a 12-hour strike and the Congress a 24-hour bandh on Thursday in protest against the gunning down of Mr. Bhowmik at the headquarters of 2nd battalion of Tripura State Rifles (TSR) in Radha Kishore Nagar near here on Tuesday. He was working as a crime reporter with a daily, Syandan Patrika.Battalion Commandant Tapan Debbarma and his bodyguard Nandalal Reang have been arrested on murder charge and their services have been terminated.The police said at least 25 supporters of the BJP, the Congress and the CPI(M) were injured in sporadic clashes during the strike and several of them were admitted to hospitals. Some 400 BJP leaders and workers were arrested across the State on charge of disruption of public order.The strike called by the two Opposition parties evoked complete response with government offices, educational institutions and business establishments remaining closed. Vehicular traffic remained off the road and national highways.Local newspapers condemned the murder by leaving their editorial space blank.last_img read more

first_imgDoctor Kafeel Khan who is languishing in jail since last September in connection with the deaths of infants in a Gorakhpur hospital was on Wednesday granted bail by the Allahabad High Court.A single Bench of Justice Yashwant Verma granted him bail accepting counsel’s argument that there was not sufficient evidence against him.Narzul Islam Jafri, Mr. Khan’s main counsel, told The Hindu that the court agreed with his argument that the State government did not have “sufficient legal evidence to connect” the doctor to the charges filed against him.Mr. Khan faces charges under attempt to commit culpable homicide, criminal breach of trust and criminal conspiracy, which fall under Sections 308, 409 and 120 B of the Indian Penal Code, respectively. The additional charges of corruption and private practice have already been dropped during investigation for lack of evidence.Also Read Gorakhpur doctor’s family concerned about his health in jail “Since the deaths were due to natural cause, there is no offence against Dr. Kafeel,” Mr. Jafri said.Mr. Khan was initially hailed as a hero for using his resources to supply oxygen to Baba Raghav Das Medical College during the crisis hour on the night of August 10 last year, when infants died there as the oxygen supply allegedly stopped.He was then a nodal officer of the National Health Mission and an assistant lecturer in the paediatrics department of the hospital. However, on the recommendations of a four-member committee led by the State Chief Secretary, Mr. Khan was among the several doctors of the hospital indicted for the incident.Sadaful Islam Jafri, also Mr. Khan’s counsel, said,“The court was of the impression, that if he is involved in private practice, then you can suspend him, but you cannot keep him in jail.”He said that in its counter-affidavit filed in the High Court, the government had admitted that the infant deaths were due to natural causes and not due to any lack of oxygen supply. Mr. Khan, while being escorted out of the district hospital, where he was taken for a medical check-up recently, said he was “being framed.”last_img read more

first_imgOn Saturday, the Maharashtra government began enforcing a ban on plastic, a decision it announced in March. On World Environment Day, June 5, India was the host nation, with the theme for this year being ‘Beat plastic pollution.’What is the plan?On March 23, the government issued a notification banning the manufacture, use, transport, distribution, wholesale and retail sale, storage and import of plastic bags with and without handle. The ban also covers disposable products, made from plastic and thermocol (polystyrene), such as single-use disposable dishes, cups, plates, glasses, fork, bowl, container, disposable dish/bowl used for packaging food in hotels, spoon, straw, non-woven polypropylene bags, cups/pouches to store liquid, packaging with plastic to wrap or store the products and packaging of food items and grain material. The ban is not applicable to PET bottles, irrespective of capacity. These bottles, however, should have predefined buyback price ranging from ₹1 to ₹2, depending on the size, printed on them. Plastic used for packaging of medicines, compostable plastic bags or material used for plant nurseries, handling of solid waste, plastic bags not less than 50 micron thickness used for packaging of milk (with the specific purpose printed on it), plastic manufactured for export in SEZs and plastic to wrap the material at the manufacturing stage are excluded from the ban. The ban is applicable to manufacturers and consumers as well as the chain in between, which includes shops, hawkers, vendors and offices.What is the penalty?Urban and rural civic bodies, Collectors, forest officers, police authorities and Maharashtra Pollution Control Board officials have been empowered to implement the ban and take legal action. The penalty for violating the ban starts from ₹5,000 (first offence), ₹10,000 (second time) and ₹25,000 (third time) with three months in jail. In case one fails to pay the minimum penalty, the civic body can file a prosecution complaint before the court, which will decide the amount to be paid.Why was this necessary?Environment experts have been blaming plastic for choking of nullahs in Mumbai and the flooding in parts of the city during monsoons. Yuva Sena president Aaditya Thackeray was one of the first to demand a complete ban on plastic, a demand which was accepted by Shiv Sena leader and Environment Minister Ramdas Kadam. Plastic bag manufacturers approached the Bombay High Court against the decision, but their appeal was turned down. The Federation of Retail Traders Welfare Association, too, has gone to court. A hearing was held on Friday, but the plea was rejected. The State has 2,500 units making plastic bags, employing 56,000 people. They owe nearly ₹11,000 crore to banks as of March 31. The Clothing Manufacturers’ Association of India has spoken out against the ban, saying the apparel trade employs 30 lakh people in the country and depends on polypropylene for packaging.What is the alternative?The State is not directly providing alternatives to banned items and has relied on people for solutions. Urban local bodies, like the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), have invited manufacturers of alternative products to showcase their wares at a three-day exhibition. What lies in store?The BMC has trained 250 inspectors for levying penalties. Their list is available on its website, along with that of its 37 collection centres where people can dispose of plastic. While levying penalty, they will be registering the offender’s Aadhaar number, PAN number or driver licence number. It has also started a dedicated helpline for door-to-door collection. As on June 21, the BMC has collected 145 tonnes of banned plastic from Mumbai. However, most of this was plastic segregated from regular waste and only a fraction is from the 24 dedicated bins for dumping plastic. This underlines the need for more awareness.last_img read more

first_imgA man was lynched in Bijopur here by a group villagers on the suspicion of being a thief, police said on Saturday. The incident took place Friday evening and a case of murder was registered against several people. Two persons were arrested, Station House Officer (SHO), Chapar, Subhash Rathore said. The deceased was identified as Kapil Tyagi. Tyagi’s family along with others staged a protest and gheraeod the Chapar police station demanding more arrests in the case, the officer said. They claimed that Tyagi was innocent and was beaten to death when he gone to work at Bijopur, Mr. Rathore said. The protest was led by former BJP district president Devert Tyagi. The matter is being investigated. Security personnel have been deployed in the village to thwart any untoward incidents, the SHO said.last_img read more

first_imgCongress president Rahul Gandhi will launch his party’s election campaign for the Assembly polls in Rajasthan with a day-long visit to Jaipur on Saturday. Mr. Gandhi will stage a roadshow on a 12-km-long route from the Sanganer airport here and address a meeting of party leaders and workers at Ramlila Maidan in the city.Preparations were in full swing here on Friday for the visit. The Special Protection Group and the city police have cleared the route after an initial confusion over the selection of arterial roads. Mr. Gandhi will travel to the venue in a specially designed bus from which he will greet the people, while his supporters will follow him in other vehicles.The party workers will welcome Mr. Gandhi at 14 points during the roadshow. Though the Pradesh Congress Committee has refrained from announcing Mr. Gandhi’s visit to any temple, he may go to the famous Govind Dev temple, a popular pilgrim centre located in the City Palace Complex here.Poll strategyPCC president Sachin Pilot, accompanied by AICC General Secretaries Ashok Gehlot and Avinash Pande, visited the Ramlila Maidan to look after the arrangements. Mr. Pilot said this would be Mr. Gandhi’s first visit to Rajasthan after becoming the party president and he would discuss with the workers the party’s road map and strategy for elections.Mr. Gandhi’s roadshow has been planned to counter the ongoing ‘Gaurav Yatra’ of Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje, which was flagged off on August 4.last_img read more

first_imgMangueshi Temple priest Dhanajay Bhave was remanded to two-days of police custody after he surrendered before Judicial Magistrate First Class (JMFC) judge on Tuesday. The 51-year old priest has been accused of for molesting two girls inside the temple in June this year.Mr. Bhave was absconding for more than a month, ever since the first molestation case was filed on July 19 and even before his anticipatory bail plea could be heard. The second victim from Mumbai filed a case a couple of days later.The Additional Sessions and District Court, Ponda, gave him temporary relief in the first case and heard both his bail pleas together but rejected both of them. The Bombay High Court at Goa too rejected his bail pleas on August 16, following which the police issued a lookout notice.Mr. Bhave was booked in two separate cases under Section 354 (outraging the modesty of a woman) of the Indian Penal Code.The victims, a Goan-origin student studying medicine in the U.S. and a Mumbai-based Goan girl, had complained to the police separately that the priest had allegedly molested them by hugging and kissing them near the sanctum sanctorum of the Mangueshi temple, while they were on a temple visit and while their parents were praying.Before approaching the police, the complainants had approached the Shree Manguesh Devasthan Committee, which had said that it could not find any dependable evidence to establish a prima facie case against Mr. Bhave and had advised the victims and their parents to approach “appropriate authority” with their complaints.The priest stands suspended from temple’s services following FIRs registered against him by police.last_img read more

first_imgAccusing the government of adopting a “policy of U-turn, somersault and flip flops with regard to Pakistan,” the Congress on Thursday wondered who had pressured India to talk to Pakistan just days after a BSF personnel’s body was mutilated by its forces in the Jammu sector of the International Border.“What happened to their position that they have been taking that ‘terror and dialogue’ can’t happen. And this comes a day after the brutal murder of a brave BSF jawan. We would like to know who pressurised India to do so,” former Union Minister Manish Tewari said.‘Barbaric killing’Addressing a press conference, he said Pakistani forces had violated every international norm in mutilating the body of the BSF jawan, Narender Singh. “This violates every canon, every convention and every laid down standard operating procedure even when it comes to adversarial armies engaging with each other… India needs to respond… The country wants a response to this inhuman and barbaric killing,” he said.Asked if the Congress supported resumption of dialogue, Mr. Tewari said the government must recognise the anger among the people. “A brave soldier of our paramilitary force has been treated in the most inhuman manner possible and this country wants a response.”last_img read more

first_imgA Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed between the Portuguese Environment Ministry and the Public Works Department of Goa will help the State manage its water resources better, Portugal Environment Minister João Pedro de Matos Fernandes said on Saturday. Mr. Fernandes, who is on a Goa visit, said that the Prime Ministers of both India and Portugal had identified water and waste management as priority areas for bilateral cooperation and that the MoU was in sync with their vision. Goa’s PWD Minister Sudin Dhavalikar described the signing of the two-year long arrangement as a “significant move to work with Portugal to develop common initiatives for water supply and waste water management.” “I think that the MoU will be important for both countries. Twenty years ago Portugal, had had exactly the problems that Goa is facing today. We invested about 10 billion euros over the past 20 to 25 years, the results of which we can see now,” Mr. Fernandes said. The MoU proposes technical partnership in the areas of water supply operation and energy efficiency, resource valorisation, waste water and sewerage planning, management and technological solutions, asset management procedure and standards, energy management operational workflows, operational data and information management. As part of the MoU, the assessment of two of the biggest water treatment and supply plants at Selaulim and Opa in Goa would be undertaken, Mr. Dhavalikar also said. Means of removal of manganese from the water processing facilities, which results in stoppages every now and then, will also be considered. “The MoU is nothing but the consolidation of a true partnership and we should not miss out on this opportunity for sustainable development,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgA senior faculty member of the leading Ahmedabad-based design school,National Institute of Design (NID) has been expelled following several complaints of sexual harassment against him by students. Krishnesh Mehta was allowed to resign and be relieved with immediate effect after he expressed regret and tendered an apology, the institute said in a release on Saturday.A committee set up by NID had found the charges of sexual harassment genuine, and recommended his termination as a faculty member. “Based on the enquiry report and findings, a show cause notice was issued to Krishnesh Mehta, and as it is a repeat offence, why his services should not be terminated. The reply given by him was not satisfactory nor was [he] showing any signs of remorse and therefore it was decided to terminate his services,” the Institute stated in a release on Saturday.“Being a senior faculty member, regretting his conduct and behaviour, and preferring to leave the services instead of being terminated, his request was considered and he was relieved from the services of NID with effect from the October 5th,” the release added.A group of students had complained about undesirable and out-of-syllabus references to sexuality and sexual relations and behaviour in Mr. Mehta’s classes. In the past, based on a complaint pertaining to his behavior amounting to sexual harassment, for which he tendered a written apology, he was awarded the punishment of the stoppage of one increment, and was also issued a strong warning that such conduct would be dealt with sternly in the future. “He is not being allowed to even enter the campus,” NID-Ahmedabad Director Pradhyumana Vyas said.last_img read more

first_imgA former U.P. Minister and senior Samajwadi Party leader has called the air strike by the Indian Air Force on a Jaish camp inside Pakistan “false.” “BJP leaders are liars. Is the surgical strike anything new? TV channels were airing it today. This (that an air strike will happen) was known for 10 days,” Samajwadi Party leader Vinod Kumar told party workers here on Tuesday.“It was known that they (the government) have colluded with Pakistan and decided to drop a couple of bombs on an abandoned house,” he claimed.The SP leader also accused the BJP of “spreading terror.”last_img read more

first_imgStill searing from the formation of the solar system, the core of Earth is a nuclear reactor generating heat from the breakdown of radioactive elements like uranium, thorium, and potassium. Scientists have been harnessing that heat for decades by drilling deep wells to power turbines. But now researchers have been able to tap into even greater energy by drilling into volcanoes and exploiting the heat of molten rock. If current geothermal wells are replaced with the new technology, it could provide 30% more power than current renewable energy sources.The idea of tapping the energy of magma came from a pair of accidents. In 1985, workers drilling for a geothermal well in Iceland ran into a sudden and uncontrollable blast of high-pressure steam. Scientists think the steam originated from a reservoir of water that’s under such pressure that as it begins to boil, the water cannot expand enough to become vapor and remains in a liquidlike state. Water in such a “supercritical state” contains enormous amounts of energy. Water reaches this state once it reaches 222 bars of pressure and 374°C or above, and flashes into steam when the pressure drops as the water rises to the surface.For the next 2 decades, researchers dreamed of capturing superhot steam from supercritical fluids and turning it into electricity. Whereas a typical geothermal well produces 5 to 10 MW of electricity, geologist Wilfred Elders, an emeritus professor at the University of California, Riverside, says supercritical wells could potentially yield 10 times that much.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The second unexpected event happened in 2009. The Icelandic Deep Drilling Project (IDDP), a consortium of energy companies and scientists, including Elders, had begun drilling for the theorized supercritical fluid wells when they hit a pocket of magma. The molten rock ruined their equipment, but the team realized that the intense heat could actually boost the production capability of the well. The higher the temperature, the easier it becomes for water to enter a supercritical state, and the magma pouring into their well was hotter than 900°C. “There is an enormous energy potential, orders of magnitude greater than can be produced from conventional geothermal systems at 200 to 300°C,” Elders says.To use the magma for energy, workers wouldn’t drill directly into it. Instead, they could either tap into superhot water in nearby magma-heated rock and use its steam to turn turbines, or make artificial steam by injecting water from the surface. In 2011, the researchers finished the well just above the magma, where the temperature didn’t quite reach 900°C. Even so, the well generated superheated steam and 35 MW of electricity at 500°C, Elders and his colleagues report in the current issue of Geothermics. For the first time, researchers proved it was possible to create supercritical geothermal wells enhanced by magma.It isn’t so simple though. IDDP’s 2011 well suffered from mechanical failure after only 2 years of use, and tools are still being developed to withstand such extreme conditions. Location is a problem, too: Magma-heated systems require active volcanoes, and even there it’s exceedingly hard to find magma to drill into. It’s “a bit like finding a needle in a haystack,” says Bruce Marsh, a professor at Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, who wasn’t involved in the work. These types of wells won’t be easily replicable, but Marsh is hopeful. “Maybe after we find a few of these things, we’ll know how to look for them,” he says.Power aside, Marsh says he is excited about the wells’ scientific value. Magma is hard to study, he notes. Researchers usually analyze it as solid rock that has come to the surface or as solid drill cores. But now scientists might be able to study it from where it is inside the crust and begin understanding what drives systems in Earth’s interior. “We’ve got a tiger by the tail,” Marsh says. “It’s the difference between studying something in the zoo and studying it in the wild.”IDDP, meanwhile, is moving forward with other supercritical geothermal wells in Iceland soon, and similar projects are under way in New Zealand and Japan. “There’s enormous potential out there,” Marsh says.last_img read more

first_imgTwo years ago, Oxford Nanopore Technologies demonstrated a revolutionary new sequencing technology at a meeting for genomicists, but it’s taken until now for it to show more data and to begin to share its new cheap, hand-held device with researchers. Meanwhile, Illumina, by far the biggest maker of sequencing machines, is about to introduce a 10-machine system that can produce 18,000 human genomes per year for less than $1000 a piece. But the machines cost $1 million apiece. Both promise to change the face of sequencing.For the full story, see this week’s issue of Science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

first_imgHumans are noisy creatures, our cacophony of jet engines and jackhammering drowning out the communications of other species. In response, a number of animals, including marmosets and whales, turn up their own volume to be heard above the din, a phenomenon called the Lombard effect. A new study reveals that even fish “shout.” Researchers took a close look at the blacktail shiner (Cyprinella venusta), which is common to freshwater streams of the southeastern United States and whose short-distance acoustic signals are often exposed to boat and road noise. Only male shiners make sounds; popping sounds called knocks are used aggressively toward other males, while staticky-sounding “growls” are used for courtship, both heard in the above video. When the scientists brought the fish back to the lab and cranked up white noise from an underwater amplifier, they found that shiner males emitted fewer, shorter pulses, and cranked up the volume of their acoustic signals to be heard above background noise. Published in Behavioral Ecology, it’s the first study documenting the Lombard effect in fish, suggesting that freshwater fish are another group potentially impacted by our ever-increasing hubbub.(Video credit: Dan Holt)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

first_imgA newly described dinosaur, whose fossils are some of the first to be unearthed in Venezuela, turns out to be the close, relatively small kin of creatures that later evolved into multiton meat eaters such as Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex. The creature, and another dinosaur whose fossils were found nearby and reported just 2 months ago, are filling in gaps in the fossil record and revealing new insights into dinosaur evolution in the wake of a mass extinction that happened about 201 million years ago.The new species, dubbed Tachiraptor admirabilis, is a predator that gets part of its name from the Venezuelan state of Táchira, where the fossils were found. Only two bones of the ancient species have been unearthed, says Max Langer, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Nevertheless, those bits (each from a different individual, and one of them not even a complete bone) tell scientists a lot, Langer notes.The bones, both from the creature’s lower leg, show the dinosaur likely measured about 1.5 meters from nose to tail, Langer says. Their general size and shape mark the creature as a theropod, a bipedal meat eater. The bones differ enough from those of other theropods to indicate that the dino is a new species, Langer and his colleagues report today in Royal Society Open Science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The now-solid rocks surrounding the fossils, which were laid down as sediments on an ancient flood plain, also tell a story. By age dating zircons—tiny crystals that typically include uranium as a trace element—in the rocks, Langer and his colleagues estimate that the sediments were deposited about 200.7 million years ago. At that time, the region—a volcanically active rift valley where Gondwana, a remnant of the supercontinent Pangaea, was itself splitting apart—sat near Earth’s equator. The period was also less than 1 million years after the mass extinction that marked the end of the Triassic period and the beginning of the Jurassic—an event that, like the dino die-offs that occurred about 65 million years ago, may have been triggered by an extraterrestrial impact.“These survivors of the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction were the ‘ground zero’ for later theropod evolution,” says Thomas Holtz Jr., a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland, College Park, who was not involved in the study. Plus, he notes, theropod fossils from this era from anywhere in the world aren’t common, so the new finds reveal what some theropods of that era looked like and will be particularly useful to researchers trying to flesh out the dinosaur family tree. The new study, he says, “shows that important discoveries don’t have to be of the biggest or the scariest [dinosaurs].”The first dinosaur reported from this region, which lived in the same area and at the same time as Tachiraptor, was unveiled in August. That creature, dubbed Laquintasaura, was slightly smaller than Tachiraptor but had the same general appearance despite being a member of a different group of dinosaurs called ornithischians, says Richard Butler, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom and a member of the team that described Laquintasaura. “All the small dinosaurs of that era looked about the same,” he notes, but subtle skeletal differences help distinguish the carnivorous theropods from their herbivorous and omnivorous relatives.The last common ancestor of theropods and ornithischians, a creature as-yet undiscovered, probably looked a lot like Tachiraptor and Laquintasaura, Butler says. Only millions of years later did many species within these groups evolve great size and distinct appearances, he notes.More fossils from this region could help paleontologists refine the dinosaur family tree further, Langer says. But such work may be a long slog, he suggests, because rocks that might hold fossils aren’t readily accessible: The recent discoveries, which were unearthed at sites where highway excavations sliced through heavily vegetated hillsides, came only after 2 decades of looking for such fossils.last_img read more

first_imgTestosterone may be the key to manliness, but it also stokes the growth of prostate cancer cells. So injections of the hormone might sound like the last thing a man with this type of cancer needs. But a new study shows that the shots can slow the progression of untreatable prostate tumors in some patients.Researchers have known since the 1940s that slashing the levels of testosterone and other male sex hormones can rein in prostate tumors. Today, a common treatment for prostate cancers that have spread to other parts of the body is chemical castration, drugs that cut the body’s production of testosterone and related hormones. But the cancer cells usually adapt to the low hormone levels and resume growing. For example, they sometimes crank out more of the receptor molecules stimulated by testosterone or switch to a version of the receptor that doesn’t need testosterone to prompt growth. Although researchers have devised new treatments to counteract this resistance, such as drugs that block the testosterone receptor, tumors often quickly develop resistance to them as well.Studies of cancer cells in a dish and tumors in animals have revealed a paradox about so-called castration-resistant prostate cancer. Cancer cells that prosper when testosterone is scarce often die when exposed to high levels of the hormone. Experiments suggest that the extra hormone disrupts DNA duplication and leads to DNA fractures, which can be fatal for a cell. This paradoxical relationship means that testosterone doses could be beneficial against resistant tumors.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Medical oncologist Michael Schweizer, now at the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, tested this strategy in 16 men whose prostate cancers had become resistant to chemical castration. Most of their tumors had spread, or metastasized. In the study, the men continued to receive chemical castration therapy, but every 28 days the researchers also injected them with testosterone. Each shot spiked blood testosterone levels well above normal, but they gradually declined until they were close to the level produced by chemical castration. The rationale for these oscillations, Schweizer says, is that “you don’t allow prostate cancer cells to get accustomed to one testosterone environment.” The hormone peaks will kill cancer cells that have adapted to low testosterone, whereas the valleys will stifle cells that require testosterone to grow.To gauge the subjects’ progress, the researchers measured the amounts of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the blood, an indicator of prostate cancer growth. Two patients left the study after the first round of treatment because of side effects. In seven of the remaining subjects, PSA levels rose during the first three rounds of treatment, suggesting that they weren’t benefiting from the injections. But PSA levels dipped in seven others, a sign that their tumors could be shrinking. “The fact that half of the guys who got through three cycles [of treatment] showed a response is encouraging,” Schweizer says.He and colleagues performed CT scans on 10 patients to check the size of their metastases, or tumor colonies spawned by the original growth. In four patients, the metastases had shrunk, and in one patient they had disappeared, the team reports online today in Science Translational Medicine. All five men were in the group that showed PSA declines.Over time, however, the advantages of testosterone injections waned. PSA levels began to rise after about 7 months, suggesting renewed growth by the tumors. But even a short-term response could extend the lives of patients, because prostate cancer that is resistant to chemical castration is typically incurable, Schweizer notes. Although a few previous studies attempted to gauge the effects on prostate cancer of boosting testosterone levels, they didn’t provide the large doses of hormone necessary to kill resistant cancer cells, he says. So the new work “is a first step toward finding out who will benefit from this treatment.”For the patients who remained in the study, side effects of the treatment included nausea and hair loss, and two subjects developed blood clots in their lungs. Of the two people who dropped out of the trial early on, one fell ill with pneumonia and died from sepsis, a body-wide inflammation that often results from infections. That’s not a typical consequence of testosterone therapy, Schweizer says, so the researchers think it was caused by a chemotherapy drug that the patients were also taking during part of the study.Some researchers and doctors have worried that testosterone treatment might speed tumor growth, notes Charles Ryan, a cancer endocrinology researcher and physician at the University of California, San Francisco, who wasn’t involved in the work. But the study shows that “there’s potentially a substantial number of patients for whom this treatment is not harmful but is possibly beneficial.” However, he’s not ready to change how he treats prostate cancer patients until researchers perform further studies that confirm the effects of testosterone and clarify the treatment’s risks.“They have intriguing clinical data,” says medical oncologist and prostate cancer researcher Christopher Logothetis of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, who also wasn’t connected to the study. But he was disappointed that the team didn’t test biopsy samples from the subjects to determine how testosterone was influencing the tumors. That analysis is essential so that researchers can figure out how to predict which patients will benefit from the treatment and which might be harmed, he says.Two other studies of testosterone therapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer have begun, Schweizer notes, so researchers may soon have a better idea of whether the treatment is superior to current approaches.last_img read more

first_imgU.S. geoscientists are accustomed to being used as a punching bag by climate change skeptics in Congress, who challenge the science of global warming. But some influential Republican legislators are now going a step further, by denigrating the discipline itself.Senator Ted Cruz (R–TX), the new chair of the science and space panel within the Senate commerce committee and an unofficial presidential candidate, asserted yesterday at a hearing that the earth sciences are not “hard science.” Freshman Senator Cory Gardner (R–CO), a member of the panel and a rising star within the Republican Party, echoed Cruz’s words. And the new chair of an important science spending panel in the House of Representatives, Representative John Culberson (R–TX), has said repeatedly in recent weeks that the earth sciences don’t meet his definition of “the pure sciences.”“We’ve seen a disproportionate increase in the amount of federal funds going to the earth sciences program at the expense of funding for exploration and space operations, planetary sciences, heliophysics, and astrophysics, which I believe are all rooted in exploration and should be central to NASA’s core mission,” Cruz said at yesterday’s hearing on NASA’s 2016 budget request. “We need to get back to the hard sciences, to manned space exploration, and to the innovation that has been integral to NASA.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The idea that the geosciences aren’t hard science comes as a shock to Margaret Leinen, president of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and a former head of the National Science Foundation’s geosciences directorate. “Of course the geosciences are part of the hard sciences,” says Leinen, head of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and vice chancellor for marine sciences at the University of California, San Diego. “They provide us with very fundamental knowledge about the way the planet works, knowledge grounded in the physical sciences.”Leinen easily ticks off a host of areas, from analyzing the complex mixtures of physical processes and chemical reactions in the atmosphere and the ocean to characterizing earthquakes, in which geoscientists have made important contributions to physics and chemistry. Geosciences can also be computationally intensive, she says, noting that for many years the world’s most powerful computer was Japan’s so-called Earth Simulator. Modeling future earthquakes in California, for example, requires “some of the most challenging computer simulations in the world,” she adds.She also scoffs at the attempt to decouple the earth sciences from planetary sciences, a discipline Cruz and Culberson strongly favor. “Our entire exploration of Mars is based on analogies with the Earth,” she points out. That’s also true, she says, for the search for extraterrestrial life on water-rich planets and moons, a burning passion for Culberson.Universities have long recognized that connection, she points out. “Virtually all academic planetary scientists are in earth science departments, because the Earth, after all, is a planet,” she says.The 60,000-member AGU reinforced Leinen’s message today in a letter to Cruz. “Earth sciences are a fundamental part of science,” writes CEO Christine McEntee. “They constitute hard sciences that help us understand the world we live in and provide a basis for knowledge and understanding of natural hazards, weather forecasting, air quality, and water availability, among other concerns.”Cruz’s dissing of the discipline during yesterday’s hearing was part of a broader attack on NASA’s priorities. He presented a chart of spending trends since the start of the Obama administration that purported to show a tilt toward the geosciences and a loss of funding for exploration.NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, the sole witness, said that he thought the numbers were misleading. “There’s a lot of chartmanship that can go on about what is included,” Bolden told Cruz at one point. “I am not saying that I agree with your numbers.” Senator Gary Peters (D–MI) took a more partisan stance. He quoted from a 2012 National Academies report that noted the “disastrous consequences” to Earth observation records from cuts to NASA’s earth sciences budget under President George W. Bush. “So it seems we were just trying to correct this problem,” Peters said about the increases since 2009.Senator Bill Nelson (D–FL), the top Democrat on the full commerce committee and the only current member of Congress to have flown in space, took a more gentlemanly tack. “Let me point out that budgets are not always as clear as what we think they are,” he said, noting that several other NASA accounts also support exploration activities. At the same time, he rejected Cruz’s attack on the discipline. “Earth science relates directly to everything we are doing in space exploration,” Nelson asserted. “And I would draw that distinction for folks who think that it’s not fashionable, that NASA doesn’t need to do earth sciences.”last_img read more