first_img Originally published June 6.Updates, June 7: Adds more details about doodles for the Women’s World Cup. June 11: Adds more doodles celebrating the Women’s World Cup. Comment 3:40 Culture Tech Industry Tags Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: How Google made a Doodle game Google is celebrating the 2019 Women’s World Cup with a series of doodles representing each of the competing countries.  Google As the US Women’s National Team prepares for their first match in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup on Tuesday, Google is celebrating all the teams in the tournament with a series of doodles.The latest homepage banner represents work by artists of six different countries: Chile, Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, Thailand and the US. Teams from each of the countries are competing Tuesday, and Google says the doodles portray a distinct message about what the tournament means for each artist and their country.Chile artist Luisa Rivera said the World Cup means “teamwork, passion and determination” to her, and Netherland artist Eline Van Dam said she wanted to show how the game “connects people all over the world.” Google kicked off its first World Cup-themed doodles last Friday to mark the start of the tournament.2019-womens-world-cup-day-1-5386703364161536-2xGoogle kicks off the FIFA Women’s World Cup with a doodle. Google “Each Doodle will capture the local excitement of the World Cup competition as well as what soccer means to the guest artist personally,” Google said. You can see the full list of 24 artists, one for each country in the tournament, in Google’s blog post. Google has already featured doodles celebrating several of the teams competing in the World Cup.On day two of the World Cup it featured: China, Germany, Nigeria, Norway, South Africa and Spain.  Google On day three of the World Cup if featured: Australia, Brazil, England, Italy, Jamaica and Scotland.  Google On day four of the World Cup it featured: Argentina, Cameroon, Canada and Japan. Google The Women’s World Cup started Friday with a match between host country France and South Korea. This year marks the eighth FIFA Women’s World Cup conference, with the first in 1991. Google also said soccer fans will be able to use Assistant and the search app to follow real-time match updates. While the Google search app will let you subscribe to team updates, Assistant can answer specific questions. If you’ve got an Android phone, you’ll be able to follow up to three real-time scores on your home screen. You can also use the Google News FIFA Women’s World Cup interactive tracker to browse highlights. And YouTube will show highlights as well as behind-the-scenes moments. Google Doodles are temporary versions of the tech company’s logo on its homepage to honor holidays and historic occasions. Earlier this week, the company featured an interactive timeline celebrating 50 years of gay pride. 1 Google Assistant Googlelast_img read more

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina and veteran Indian actress Sharmila Tagore will be honoured with honorary Doctor of Literature (D.Litt) at a convocation of Kazi Nazrul University in Asansol on 26 May, reports webindia123.com quoting official sources on Wednesday.The prime minister is expected to reach West Bengal on 25 May for the inauguration of the Bangladesh centre at Santiniketan, Bolpur, where Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, Bengal governor KS Tripathi and chief minister Mamata Banerjee will also attend a convocation of Visva Bharati.After a night halt there, the Bangladesh prime minister would visit Kazi Nazrul University at Asansol where she will receive honorary D Litt from the authorities.Along with Sheikh Hasina veteran actress Sharmila Tagore would also be honoured with honorary doctorate.Tripathi, Ms Banerjee and state education minister Partha Chatterjee would also attend the convocation.Scientist Yusuf Hasan of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre will also be honoured by the university, sources said.last_img read more

first_img Share Laura SkeldingState Board of Education member Marisa Perez-Diaz speaks to a group of people rallying for the inclusion of Mexican-American studies in public school curriculum outside the Texas Education Agency on April 11, 2018.Texas advocates for Mexican-American studies classes won a bitter victory Wednesday, in gaining approval to move forward with the class they wanted, but losing the course title.The board had been debating more than four years over how and whether to offer teachers materials and guidance to teach Mexican-American studies. In a preliminary vote, the State Board of Education voted nearly unanimously to create curriculum standards for the elective class. But now it will be called “Ethnic Studies: An Overview of Americans of Mexican Descent.”  A final vote on the issue is scheduled for Friday.The class will be based on an innovative course Houston ISD got state approval to offer in 2015. Texas Education Agency staff will make any needed changes to that set of curriculum standards and then bring it back for the first of two public hearings and votes in June.Lawrence Allen, a Houston Democrat, was the only member to vote against the newly named course, expressing support for Mexican-American studies but criticizing the new title.Starting a fierce debate with Democrats on the board, Beaumont Republican David Bradley proposed the new name for the course. When asked why he didn’t want to keep “Mexican-American studies,” he said, “I don’t subscribe to hyphenated Americanism. … I find hyphenated Americanism to be divisive.”“As someone who identifies as Mexican-American, your experience is unlike my experience,” San Antonio Democrat Marisa Perez-Diaz retorted. “I’m asking you to be inclusive.”Most Democrats, except for El Paso Democrat Georgina Perez, voted against Bradley’s proposal. But they were outnumbered. Standing outside the hearing room to discuss their strategy after the vote, Texas professors and teachers criticized Perez for voting to strip the Mexican-American studies class of its name and brainstormed future options.“We can change the name in the public comment phase if enough of you turn out,” said Brownsville Democrat Ruben Cortez, who represents District 2 on the board and has been spearheading the fight for a Mexican-American studies course for years.Of 38 people who signed up to testify on the issue, 37 noted they were in favor of approving the course. (The one person who signed up in opposition is Friendswood ISD board member Matt Robinson, likely to replace Bradley in January. He did not speak Wednesday.)Even before the vote, Texas teachers could already offer Mexican-American studies as a social studies elective, but they have to put in additional work to build a course structure and choose textbooks. That left smaller school districts facing an uphill climb to get a class started.With little centralized guidance on what to teach in Mexican-American studies, districts currently offer varying versions of the course.Teachers already offering some version of Mexican-American studies shared positive reviews from their students who talked about being thrilled to see themselves reflected in their coursework. They also asked the board to approve a set of centralized standards for how to teach the course, so they could spend more time teaching than planning what to teach.“Students have a lot more freedom when we learn about our culture,” said Damian Mota, a seventh-grade student at KIPP Camino Academy in San Antonio. “If you walk into our classroom, you’re not going to see a traditional classroom. We are passionate learners who back up our claims.”Teachers and professors who testified cited research showing that students who learn their cultural histories do better academically.“We’re not proposing a supplement to what is already being done,” said University of Texas at Austin professor Emilio Zamora. “Research has demonstrated that Mexican-American studies … does improve academic performance.”At the board’s first public hearing on the matter in January, some Republican board members pushed back on the idea of an official course. Board member Marty Rowley, an Amarill0 Republican, said in January that a Mexican-American studies course could be exclusionary by not focusing on the contribution of “other Latinos to Texas history or American history.”In 2014, the board rejected a proposal to create an official Mexican-American studies course, with some members arguing that creating a separate class would be racially divisive. Instead, board members voted to put ethnic studies, including Mexican-American, African-American, Asian-American and Native American studies, on a list of social studies textbooks it would ask publishers to develop for Texas schools.Critics of that decision have argued that asking publishers to create books without curriculum standards to reference is ineffectual. They said approving the course first, and the standards to go along with it, would give publishers much needed guidance as well as reassurance that school districts might actually buy their textbooks.The board has twice put out calls for ethnic studies textbooks since 2015 and failed to find Mexican-American studies materials they wanted to approve.Board members also voted Wednesday to create a process for approving other elective courses in ethnic studies. Just courses in Native American, Latino, African American and Asian Pacific Islander studies will be considered.Disclosure: The University of Texas at Austin has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.last_img read more

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — An ancient form may be coming to the modern world. A new project, called the Lunar Cubit, features a set of nine black pyramid-shaped solar powered structured. The structures will power thousands of homes in the Abu Dhabi desert. Each of the pyramids would be able to provide power to about 250 desert homes. This instillation may not be powerful as a standard solar power farm, but it would be visually stunning. Egypt to open inner chambers of ‘bent’ pyramid The Lunar Cubit project was designed by Robert Flottemesch, Jen DeNike, Johanna Ballhaus, and Adrian P. De Luca. It is inspired by the ancient measurements that allowed for the original pyramids to be constructed, with the proposed measurements proportional to the Great Pyramid of Cheops in Giza. Citation: The Lunar Cubit could merge art and solar power (2011, February 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-02-lunar-cubit-merge-art-solar.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: www.lunarcubit.com/images/LUNA … -WEBDOWNLOADV2.0.pdf The proposed structure consists of eight small pyramids that surrounding a central, larger pyramid in a semi circle. This design allows for the structures to also act as a lunar calender. The structures will use LED lights to illuminate in different combinations to indicate the waxing or waning of the moon.The project was first submitted as a proposal in the Land Art Generator Initiative. The contest asked designers to create a large-scale renewable energy project that would double as a work of art.The Lunar Cubit would feature frameless solar panels made of glass and amorphous silicon. The structures would be expected to pay back the cost of construction in about five years. All nine of the pyramids would constitute a 1.74 MW utility-scale power plant, with the central pyramid being responsible for converting the energy to AC electricity for home use. Explore furtherlast_img read more