first_img 0 Now playing: Watch this: Stronger data privacy laws may be coming to the US Post a comment 1:41 Tags In conjunction with the settlement, TikTok said that starting Wednesday it’ll direct younger users to “a limited, separate app experience that introduces additional safety and privacy protections designed specifically for this audience.” The version for younger users doesn’t allow sharing of personal information and puts “extensive” limitations on content and interactions, TikTok said. TikTok also launched a series of safety videos Wednesday aimed at guiding users through the app’s community guidelines, privacy settings and digital well-being tools. As part of the settlement, the app must also comply with COPPA going forward and take down videos made by kids under the age of 13.  TikTok has reportedly surpassed 1 billion downloads on iOS and Android. Joel Saget / AFP/Getty Images Social video app TikTok will pay $5.7 million dollars to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it illegally collected personal information from children. TikTok, previously known as Musical.ly, lets users record themselves lip-synching to popular music videos and share the clips with friends. The app has reportedly surpassed 1 billion downloads on iOS and Android. The FTC had alleged that the app’s operators violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act by failing to obtain parental consent before collecting personal info on kids under the age of 13, according to a release Wednesday. TikTok also failed to delete that personal information when they received complaints from parents and their children, according to the FTC.”This record penalty should be a reminder to all online services and websites that target children: We take enforcement of COPPA very seriously, and we will not tolerate companies that flagrantly ignore the law,” said FTC Chairman Joe Simons in the release, which noted that this is the larges- ever civil penalty obtained by the commission in a children’s privacy case. Privacy FTC Mobile Digital Media Share your voicelast_img read more

first_img Volkswagen (VW) first sold a diesel vehicle in Britain equipped with software which rigged the result of emissions tests in 2008, UK managing director Paul Willis told the Commons Transport select committee on 12 October. It seems around 2008 from the information I have at the moment. I knew nothing about this subject until 19 September this year, when I first heard it on the news from the United States.During the hearing Willis answered questions from British lawmakers and vowed that Volkswagen would work to win back trust. He also said there were questions around the emissions testing process, and that the firm should discuss with British regulators the possibility of paying towards the re-testing of vehicles. Willis told Louise Ellman, the chair of the parliamentary committee, that the first recalls of the faulty models will take place in the first quarter of 2016.Were determined to get to the bottom of this, because we have to get to the bottom of this issue to regain the trust of our customers. We will call the cars back step by step and I intend in the United Kingdom to contact every single customer to try to call those cars back, said Willis. The Volkswagen managing director also defended allegations that it was a corporate decision to circumvent the emissions tests. I find it absolutely implausible that senior people of the company would have known of these issues with regard to the testing regime, he said.The biggest business crisis in VWs 78-year history has wiped about a third off its share price, forced out its long-time CEO, prompted investigations across the world and shaken both the car industry and German establishment. Closelast_img read more

first_imgVolkswagen may offer VW owners in Germany discounts on new cars if they turn in certain old models affected by the emissions scandal that has rocked Europe’s biggest carmaker, German news agency DPA reported on Sunday.Volkswagen is battling the biggest business crisis in its 78-year history after admitting last month it installed software in diesel vehicles to deceive U.S. regulators about the true level of their toxic emissions.The company has said it would recall around 8.5 million diesel vehicles in Europe that contained such software. The special offers would be available only in Germany, where around 2.4 million of the vehicles to be recalled were sold.Incentives for VW owners to buy new vehicles could help ensure that sales remain stable after the scandal and take pressure off VW dealerships to implement fixes quickly.Each German dealership will have to handle an average of 1,100 recalled vehicles, each of which will require at least an hour and a half of work, DPA said. That could result in a long wait for customers.The offer of discounts for new car buyers may focus on the owners of vehicles with 1.6 litre diesel engines, sources at Volkswagen and VW dealerships said, according to DPA. Those models need hardware changes, a more costly upgrade than the software changes needed for other affected vehicles.No decision had been made on the matter yet, DPA quoted a person familiar with the matter as saying.Volkswagen said in response that it was common for Volkswagen and its dealers to consider special offers for existing customers.last_img read more

first_imgWENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOConnie De La Rosa holds baby Angel in the NICU at University Hospital. She’s the first participant in a new study of Family Nurture Intervention.Each year, 1 in 10 babies born in the U.S. spends time in the NICU, the neonatal intensive care unit. Years later, many of these children have developmental, learning or behavioral problems, including autism.A new study is designed to determine if different kinds of nurturing in the first few months of life could improve outcomes. San Antonio mothers and babies are taking part in the research. Baby Angel came into the world early, 11 weeks early to be exact, weighing less than four pounds.“He was so tiny and had all these wires on him and I was scared to hurt him,” said Angel’s mother Connie De La Rosa.De La Rosa spends as much time as she can with her son in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of San Antonio’s University Hospital.WENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOBaby Angel was born 11 weeks early. He’s spending time in University Hospital’s NICU until he’s ready to go home.Umber Darilek , RN, said there’s no playbook for mothers of tiny, sometimes sick babies.  No book to read, no real world advice from your grandmother on how to cope.“We see moms looking terrified,” Darilek commented. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.”That’s why Martha Welch, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York is studying an intervention called Family Nurture. Welch believes early physical trauma and a potential lack of emotional connection between mother and baby may set up these young patients for difficulties later.“They’re isolated,” Welch stated. “They’re not having social involvement. We think they are being adversely conditioned to human contact because so much of the contact is challenging. It’s tubes and IVs and skin pricks. Pre-term infants have a higher rate of risk for developmental problems including autism.”Welch says early in life, when babies cuddle in their mother’s arms, or nurse, or have eye contact, they develop a bond at the visceral level, in the autonomic nervous system that’s responsible for what we call “gut feelings.” That means later in life, you may feel calmer just by being around your mother.To help establish that connection in the NICU, nurture specialists help new moms with skin-to-skin holding, comforting touch, scent exchange, eye contact and vocal soothing.“We did a very successful first trial with amazing outcomes, totally different from the usual outcomes for pre-term infants in terms of cognition, language, risk for autism, behavior,” Welch said.Now, University Hospital is taking a page from Columbia’s playbook, conducting a family nurturing study of its own to try and replicate positive results for NICU babies.“It was like a light bulb. It was like ‘wow,’” said neonatologist Alice Gong, MD, of UT Health San Antonio.Gong said during her three decades of dealing with mother-baby interaction, she has witnessed the temper tantrums and intestinal issues that often plague NICU babies for years.“They’ve been sheltering their baby for so long,” Gong said of the new mothers. “They’re so scared they are going to die that they pretty much don’t mother them the same way they do their other children.”Gong is recruiting 50 moms and babies for her study. De La Rosa is the first.“She told me that I would help my baby connect,” De La Rosa commented. “I hold him skin to skin, talk to my baby, show him emotions. Now mommy instincts are kicking in.”Welch said science backs up her early positive results. By 18 months, one in four NICU babies has behaviors that fall somewhere on the autism spectrum. With Family Nurture Intervention, that number decreased to one in ten. The ultimate goal of these studies is to change the culture in NICUs around the country. Copyright 2017 KSTX-FM. To see more, visit KSTX-FM. Sharelast_img read more

first_img Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: P. G. Ledda et al. Flow dynamics of a dandelion pappus: A linear stability approach, Physical Review Fluids (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.4.071901 Last year, a team at the University of Edinburgh published the results of their study on the flight of dandelion seeds, conducted using cameras and miniature wind tunnels. They discovered that the unique design of the pappus—the parachute-looking bristles—allowed the seeds to float on the wind in a very efficient manner. They found that as the pappus floats along, the spines channel the air around them in such a way as to form a vortex in the pappus’s wake. And because the air pressure is lower in the vortex, the pappus and its seed cargo are able to remain aloft longer than they would otherwise. In this new effort, the researchers sought to better understand the role of the number of spines in creating the vortex and in maintaining flight stability.To better understand the flight behavior of the pappus, the researchers created models to mimic its behavior using equations from fluid dynamics. In their paper, they describe their models as collections of rods connected together in a way that was similar to the spokes on a bicycle wheel. The physics equations allowed them to model airflow patterns that occur naturally as a pappus floats through the air. Credit: Physical Review Fluids (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.4.071901 The researchers report that their models showed the same kinds of vortices forming as the researchers with the prior effort had seen first-hand. They next ran the models using different numbers of rods. They found that the optimum number was 100, which matched the number found in a real pappus. At this number, the pappus was most stable while floating—with more rods, flight became unstable; with fewer rods, flight distance was reduced. They suggest their findings could be used to design lighter-weight parachutes.center_img Citation: Equations from fluid dynamics used to find optimum arrangement of rods in dandelion pappus (2019, July 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-equations-fluid-dynamics-optimum-rods.html A team of researchers from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the University of Twente and Università di Pisa has used equations from fluid dynamics to find the optimum arrangement of rods in a dandelion pappus. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their work and what it showed. © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Physical Review Letterslast_img read more

first_img Jeff Roberson Federal Judge Blocks Parts Of Missouri Law That Bans… by NPR News Bobby Allyn 8.27.19 4:47pm Updated at 4:46 p.m. ETPortions of a Missouri law banning abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy were blocked by a federal judge just a day before the legislation was to go into effect.U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs issued the order halting the law, whose provisions also call for physicians who perform an abortion after eight weeks to face possible prison time and have their license suspended or revoked. “While federal courts should generally be very cautious before delaying the effect of state laws, the sense of caution may be mitigated when the legislation seems designed, as here, as a protest against Supreme Court decisions,” Sachs wrote in his opinion.Sachs denied a full preliminary injunction on technical grounds, but his ruling achieved what he called the “desired result” sought by Planned Parenthood for now. He left in place — at least for now — prohibitions on abortion for reasons of race, sex or a suspected diagnosis of Down syndrome in the fetus.The legislation that Republican Gov. Mike Parson signed in May has an exception for medical emergencies, but not for victims of rape or incest. Planned Parenthood filed suit to halt the law last month, and its lawyers told the court that the legislation would mean “patients will be subject to significant and irreparable constitutional, medical, emotional, and other harms for which no adequate remedy at law exists.” In a statement, Kristan Hawkins of the anti-abortion rights group Students for Life called Tuesday’s ruling “a travesty of justice and an insult to the democratic process.”Alexis McGill Johnson, acting president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, welcomed the decision blocking a law that she called “harmful.” “What little abortion access in Missouri is left, will stay in place for the time being. In the meantime, we cannot ignore the part of this law that remains in place, which allows politicians to interfere with the patient-provider relationship,” she said. But Marjorie Dannenfelser, the president of the Susan B. Anthony List, an anti-abortion group, criticized the judge’s decision. “Missouri is a strongly pro-life state and lawmakers acted on their constituents’ will when they passed landmark protections for unborn children and their mothers,” Dannenfelser said. “We are extremely disappointed in today’s ruling which blocks limits on abortion, even late-term abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy when the child can feel excruciating pain.”Sachs’ ruling follows several other federal court decisions that have barred restrictive abortion laws from being implemented in states such as Ohio and Mississippi. Many of those laws criminalize the procedure as soon as heartbeat activity can be detected — as early as six weeks, which is before many women even know they’re pregnant.Anti-abortion-rights activists are hoping that legal challenges to one of the state laws will reach the U.S. Supreme Court in an effort to overturn the constitutional right to an abortion established by the landmark 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade.In its July lawsuit, the clinic, Reproductive Health Services of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region, said the Missouri law would “directly violate long-standing Supreme Court precedent,” calling it “Missouri’s unrelenting campaign to deny patients the health care they seek and to which they are entitled.”The state’s law was written with an eye toward banning the procedure as early as the courts will allow it. If an eight-week ban is thrown out, the law includes a cascading series of 14-, 18- and 20-week abortion bans that could take effect instead.”The hostility to, and refusal to comply with, the Supreme Court’s abortion jurisprudence is most obviously demonstrated in the attempt to push ‘viability’ protection downward in various weekly stages to 8 weeks,” the judge wrote, referring to the way the state crafted the law. In a separate process, the fate of the last remaining clinic that provides abortions in Missouri remains uncertain. Parson’s administration says the clinic is not meeting state health regulations. Planned Parenthood officials say they have done all they can to comply but that the rules are being arbitrarily enforced for political reasons. A hearing in that matter is planned for October.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more