first_imgTesla reports fourth-quarter loss, operating expenses soar412 viewsTesla reports fourth-quarter loss, operating expenses soar412 views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00Tesla reports fourth-quarter loss, operating expenses soar412 viewsBusinessTesla released fourth quarter earnings late Wednesday that put the brakes on the luxury electric car maker. Costs from expanding its global sales network and developing the Model X crossover nearlyVentuno Web Player 4.50Tesla released fourth quarter earnings late Wednesday that put the brakes on the luxury electric car maker. Costs from expanding its global sales network and developing the Model X crossover nearlylast_img read more

first_imgUnlike similar initiatives in other states, this rule was crafted quietly within the Texas Workforce Commission, not by elected officials. The Texas rule was drafted using language lifted directly from proposals lobbyists sent to commission officials months before. That’s according to internal emails obtained by the advocacy group Workers Defense Project. The group’s executive director Jose Garza demanded the rule be revoked outside an agency building in Austin.“The proposed rule as we sit here today sits under a heavy cloud of corruption and suspicion and the TWC [Texas Workforce Commission] has a lot of explaining to do,” said Garza. 00:00 /00:59 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X Elizabeth Trovall/Houston Public MediaLobbyists working for the digital app Handy corresponded with the Texas Workforce Commission months before the new gig-economy rule was proposed.Workers who offer home repair, food delivery and other services through digital apps could lose certain protections under a rule proposed by the Texas Workforce Commission.Advocates are calling on the state agency to withdraw the rule, which would classify workers as contractors, not employees, when dispatched by a digital platform.By classifying their workers as contractors, gig-economy employers (like Uber, Lyft or Handy) wouldn’t have to pay out unemployment insurance. State Representative Ramón Romero (D) is from Fort Worth and said these rules should have been debated by elected officials as in all other states.“Changes such as these, that are for the gig-economy companies’ wide discretion in categorizing their employees as contractors rather than employees, should be deliberated by the legislature with public input rather than decided on by appointed commissioners,” Romero said. A spokesperson for the Texas Workforce Commission told News 88.7 they stand by their rule making process.“When drafting rules, TWC program staff may rely on their expertise, their own professional research, or review of legislation in other states. This was the case in the drafting of TWC proposed rules on digital marketplace platforms,” the commission’s spokesperson said in a written statement. Across the country, lobbyists from digital employment platforms, like Handy, are pushing legislation to classify workers as contractors. In all other cases so far, lobbyists have passed initiatives legislatively. Similar laws to the Texas rule failed to pass or were withdrawn in states like Colorado and Georgia. The Texas Workforce Commission proposed this rule in late December 2018 and is not yet in effect.  Sharelast_img read more

first_imgLouisville countered in singles as Neely knotted the score at 1-1 with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over Caroline Morton on court three. Suswam then gave the Cardinals a 2-1 lead, topping Guna 6-3, 6-2 at No. 2. LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The University of Louisville women’s tennis team topped Cincinnati 5-2 on Sunday afternoon at the Bass-Rudd Tennis Center to remain undefeated in dual match action. With the victory, the Cardinals improve to 5-0, while the Bearcats drop to 1-2.   Tennis Match ResultsCincinnati vs Louisville1/27/2019 at Louisville, Ky.(Bass-Russ Tennis Center) The Cardinals continued to roll, picking up another victory on court four as Jovic triumphed over Coutino 6-2, 6-3 to extend the lead to 3-1. However, the Bearcats responded with a win of their own at the five-spot as Maria Santili beat Hamlin 7-5, 6-1. Photo Gallery  Singles competition1. Aleksandra Mally (LOU) def. Antonella Bramato (CIN) 6-3, 3-6, 6-22. Sena Suswam (LOU) def. Ioana Guna (CIN) 6-3, 6-23. Raven Neely (LOU) def. Caroline Morton (CIN) 6-3, 6-14. Nikolina Jovic (LOU) def. Alexia Coutino (CIN) 6-2, 6-35. Maria Santilli (CIN) def. Chloe Hamlin (LOU) 7-5, 6-16. Diana Wong (LOU) def. Emma Miceli (CIN) 6-0, 4-6, 6-4 In other doubles action, the Cardinals’ Nikolina Jovic and Chloe Hamlin downed Ioana Guna and Anna Philip 6-4 at No. 2. Mally also won a tightly contested battle on court one, prevailing over Bramato 6-3, 3-6, 6-2 to seal the 5-2 win over the Bearcats. “I’m really happy with this. We didn’t play as well as we could, but part of that was because of Cincinnati,” said UofL head coach Mark Beckham. “We did have a couple nicks here and there, but once again, I’m not in the excuse making business. The thing that I really liked was that we still found ways to win. For me, it was a really good win because Cincinnati battles.” Story Links The Bearcats gained the initial advantage in doubles as Antonella Bramato and Alexia Coutino defeated Sena Suswam and Raven Neely 6-4 at No. 1. Despite a hard-fought effort on court three, Dina Chaika and Diana Wong fell to Emma Miceli and Caroline Morton by a mark of 6-4, allowing Cincinnati to secure an early 1-0 lead.center_img Matchup History With the match coming down to courts one and six, Wong outlasted Cincinnati’s Miceli 6-0, 4-6, 6-4 at No. 6 to move the score to 4-2 and clinch the victory for the Cardinals. Up next, the Cardinals will head south to play Charleston Southern on Saturday at 12 p.m. Next Match: vs. Charleston Southern 2/2/2019 | 12:00 p.m. Match Notes:Order of finish: Doubles (1,2,3); Singles (3,2,4,5,6,1) Print Friendly Version Louisville 5, Cincinnati 2 Preview  Doubles competition1. Antonella Bramato/Alexia Coutino (CIN) def. Sena Suswam/Raven Neely (LOU) 6-42. Nikolina Jovic/Chloe Hamlin (LOU) def. Ioana Guna/Anna Philp (CIN) 6-43. Emma Miceli/Caroline Morton (CIN) def. Dina Chaika/Diana Wong (LOU) 6-4 Full Schedule Roster last_img read more

first_img Journal information: Nature Communications Explore further More information: Jay Shah et al. “The oldest magnetic record in our solar system identified using nanometric imaging and numerical modeling.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03613-1 © 2018 Phys.org Magnetic induction map of a magnetically non-uniform kamacite grain (consisting mostly of iron), which is encased within a dusty olivine crystal in a meteorite. The arrows and the color wheel indicate the direction of magnetic induction. Scale bar: 200 nm. Credit: Shah et al. Published in Nature Communications This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img The researchers, Jay Shah and coauthors from the UK, Germany, and Norway, have published a paper on the discovery of the oldest magnetic record in a recent issue of Nature Communications.”Our study shows that magnetic fields that were present during the birth of our solar system are credibly contained within meteorite samples that we have in our collections,” Shah told Phys.org. “With a better understanding of these complex magnetization structures, we can access this magnetic field information, and deduce how our solar system evolved from a disk of dust to the planetary system we see today.”In the field of paleomagnetism, the main objects of study are ancient rocks and other materials which, as they cooled during their formation, acquired a thermoremanent magnetization imparted by the magnetic fields present at the time. By studying these magnetic materials, researchers can find clues as to what kinds of magnetic fields existed in the early solar system.As the researchers explain in their paper, the underpinning hypothesis in paleomagnetism is Néel’s single domain theory, which predicts that uniformly magnetized grains can retain their magnetic states over geological timescales. However, Néel’s theory says nothing about non-uniformly magnetized grains, which are the most abundant form of magnetism present in rocks and meteorites. Although some research has suggested that non-uniform magnetization states do not retain their magnetization very well, the question has remained unanswered until now.The new study shows, for the first time, that iron with non-uniform magnetization states can retain magnetic recordings from more than 4 billion years ago. To show this, the researchers used cutting-edge imaging techniques (nanometric magnetic imaging and off-axis electron holography) to study the magnetic grains in dusty olivine, which are a few hundred nanometers in size. In tests, the researchers heated the grains above 300 °C, the highest temperature that these meteorites would have experienced since forming 4.6 billion years ago, and observed that the grains retain their magnetic states. As the thermal relaxation times at this temperature are longer than the age of the solar system, the results strongly indicate that the thermoremanent magnetization imparted during their formation has remained stable to the present day.The researchers expect that the results will lead to a better understanding of the magnetic field in the early solar system, and even how the solar system originated.”I hope that this study can drive a better understanding of complex magnetization structures that will result in more sophisticated analyses of ancient magnetic fields throughout the solar system, including those on Earth,” Shah said. Citation: Oldest magnetic record in the solar system discovered in a meteorite (2018, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-oldest-magnetic-solar-meteorite.html Researchers have found that an iron-containing mineral called dusty olivine, present in meteorites, retains a record of the magnetic field from the early solar system around 4.6 billion years ago. The results are surprising, as the magnetism in dusty olivine is non-uniform, and non-uniform magnetic materials have previously been thought to be poor magnetic recorders. The discovery may lead to new insight into how the solar system formed—with the help of magnetic fields—from a protoplanetary disk. Magnetic fields frozen into meteorite grains tell a shocking tale of solar system birthlast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Twenty five officers of eight constituted state services will be sent for in-service training programme on Public FinanceManagement.Out of the two phases in the training, the domestic leg of the training will be held in Haryana, while the foreign leg in Singapore.The eight state services include West Bengal Revenue Service, West Bengal Audit and Accounts Service, West Bengal Food and Supplies Service, West Bengal Employment Service, West Bengal Co-operative Service, West Bengal Labour Service, West Bengal Information and Cultural Service and West Bengal Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeForest Service.The domestic leg of the training programme will be held at OP Jindal Global University in Haryana. It will be held from November 19 to 23.Meanhwile, the second part of the training that will take place in Singapore will be held at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy where the officers will undergo training from November 26 to 30.The officers will be leaving Kolkata on November 18 and return only after their training programme in Singapore.All the expenses in connection with the training, logistics, accomodation, airfare, etc for both the domestic and foreign legs of the training programme will be borne by the state government.The head of offices of all the respective state services have been requested to release the officers for the training from November 18 toDecember 2.last_img read more