first_imgBOSTON, MA — The MBTA and its operating partner for Commuter Rail, Keolis Commuter Services, announced the special $10 Commuter Rail weekend fare pilot will resume on Saturday, January 5. This special weekend fare is available from the first train on Saturday to the last train on Sunday and may be used across all zones and all lines.“Resuming this pilot allows our customers to continue taking advantage of Commuter Rail as a travel option on weekends, while we study the potential for making this program permanent,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak. “I want to thank our partners at the FTA for working with us to resume this pilot and also acknowledge the enthusiastic response we received from our customers to this initiative.”The special $10 all-weekend fare will be available on the mTicket app, onboard trains (cash or credit card from conductors), and at ticket windows at North, South, and Back Bay stations. The special fare applies to customers age 12 and above; the weekend fare allows adults to travel with 2 children under 12 at no additional cost.“The MBTA’s reduced weekend fare initiative gives passengers a convenient and affordable option to visit a number of great destinations across the greater Boston area,” said Keolis General Manager and CEO David Scorey. “We’re pleased to partner with the MBTA to continue this initiative that encourages new passengers to try Commuter Rail, helps to grow ridership, and promotes an environmentally friendly transit option.”Customers can visit MBTA.com/MassByTrain to explore destinations around the greater Boston area accessible by Commuter Rail and for listings of fun weekend excursions.First piloted during the summer of 2018, the promotional fares were launched with the goal of increasing Commuter Rail ridership and revenue on the weekends when trains have additional capacity. During the 6-month period these fares were available, 180,000 tickets were sold. This represents 23% of weekend sales and a 4.6% increase in weekend revenues compared to the same time period in 2017. While weekend construction impacted direct year-over-year analysis, passenger feedback throughout the summer pilot was very positive.During their first 6 months being offered to passengers, the special fares were marketed digitally, on radio, and in direct mailers to new homeowners as part of a broad, comprehensive marketing program. This marketing program is the result of a ridership and revenue growth partnership between the MBTA and Keolis, a first-of-its-kind contract in the United States, and marketing $10 fares will continue.With the exception of the CapeFlyer, operated through a partnership with the Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority, and special event trains for destinations such as Gillette Stadium, this pilot applies to all MBTA Commuter Rail services on Saturdays and Sundays.(NOTE: The above press release is from the MBTA.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMBTA Adds Extra Late-Night Commuter Rail Trains For This Weekend’s Lowell Folk FestivalIn “Government”Wilmington Commuter Rail Riders To See 50 Cent Increase In Fares Beginning July 1In “Government”Lowell Line Weekend Commuter Rail Service To Be Replaced By Bus Shuttle For 3 Weekends Beginning May 12In “Government”last_img read more

first_imgSpace City FilmsAn astronaut on a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /09:36 X center_img Share Space City FilmsWhen you think about the dangers of a spacewalk, accidentally floating away from your ship or running out of air might come to mind — but not drowning.But that’s what almost happened to an astronaut on a spacewalk in 2013.A new documentary details what went wrong. It’s called EVA 23. EVA stands for extravehicular activity, NASA lingo for a spacewalk.It was July 2013, and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano were doing some pretty routine work outside the International Space Station.But things took a turn when Parmitano experienced something unusual: he felt water on the back of his neck.The incident wasn’t cause for panic. Perhaps the pouch containing his drinking water had leaked as they believed it had on a previous spacewalk.But, as time passed, more water began filling Parmitano’s helmet to the point where his eyes and nose were covered — only his mouth remained unobstructed so he could breathe.Space City FilmsItalian astronaut Luca Parmitano demonstrates how water behaves in zero gravity.Eventually the decision was made to end the EVA and return the station. But as he worked his way back in the darkness of space the water began moving as he moved, creating the fear he wouldn’t get back to the airlock before his helmet was completely filled.Space City FilmsNASA astronaut Chris Cassidy describes the problem that occurred with his colleague’s spacesuit, as documented in the film EVA 23.The story of what went wrong and how Parmitano survived with the help of Cassidy and his ISS crew mates makes for a harrowing reminder of the inherent dangers of space exploration.In the audio above, the film’s directors Phil Sexton and Austin Havican of the Clear Lake-based production company Space City Films tell Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty the story of EVA 23.The documentary is screening now at both the Kennedy Space Center and Space Center Houston.– / 8 Listenlast_img read more