first_imgMaruti Suzuki, India’s largest car maker appears to be preparing for an aggressive launch in the domestic market in the near future. The company, which recently took the wraps off its much anticipated Celerio in India, has now showcased a few interesting customised vehicles at the ongoing 12th edition of Delhi Auto Expo.Maruti’s Swift is undoubtedly one of the best offerings from the company for the Indian auto enthusiasts. The car has earned many accolades sine its foray into the auto market. Now the brand is trying its luck in the hot hatch segment with the sportier version of Swift – Swift Sport.Donned in yellow paint, the new Swift Sports flaunts a sporty and aggressive look. The car accommodates safety features like ABS (anti-lock braking system) with EBD (electronic brake force distribution), ESP, dual front, electronically adjustable side-view mirrors, dual airbags in the front, curtain airbags and a knee airbag for the driver. Other features of the car include HID projector headlights, automatic headlights, power folding wing mirrors, keyless entry and Bluetooth compatible music system.Under the hood, Swift Sports packs 1.6-litre 4-cylinder motor, which can churn out a power of 100PS at 6900RPM and a peak torque of 160Nm at 4,400RPM. The vehicle can accelerate from 0-100 kmph in 8.7 seconds and can attain a top speed of 193kmph.The company also unveiled a new avatar of its Swift Dzire called Swift Dzire Opula. The car houses a slew of features like dual tone seats, dual tone dashboard and a console fitted with display.last_img read more

first_imgSujeeth and Prabhas on Saaho setSaaho, a Prabhas and Shraddha Kapoor starrer, is one of the most awaited films of the year and audience across the country are looking forward to watching the visual extravaganza on August 15. But the film is likely not releasing on the given date.News that the film is being postponed is doing rounds on social media. Sources from the production house have revealed that the release of the film might be postponed by 15 days. It is now expected to hit the screens on August 30. An official confirmation from the makers is awaited.The reason for the delay in release due to the slow pace of work that is happening. The post-production works have begun just a couple of days ago and the lead actors are still working for some patchwork scenes. A lot of editing work is still pending, though the technical team has been working day and night. Since the beginning, there has always been a delay in the shootings and schedules. The makers have got a shock when music composers have said that they are walking out of the project. Finding composers have taken a lot of the time of the makers and that made way to delay in a lot of things. Source from the direction department says, “Except delay in post-production, there is no other reason for the delay, in case it is really going to get delayed. It is of course for the betterment and I think the delay of Saaho is going to make way for many other films to lock that date for release. The film has been wrapped up on Tuesday and we are hoping to release it as early as possible to keep up the promise.”Many films have made their way for Saaho and have chosen other dates to release their films. If Saaho gets delayed, it is going to be difficult for distributors and producers of other films to adjust dates and theatres. Let us see what happens.last_img read more

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina and veteran Indian actress Sharmila Tagore will be honoured with honorary Doctor of Literature (D.Litt) at a convocation of Kazi Nazrul University in Asansol on 26 May, reports webindia123.com quoting official sources on Wednesday.The prime minister is expected to reach West Bengal on 25 May for the inauguration of the Bangladesh centre at Santiniketan, Bolpur, where Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, Bengal governor KS Tripathi and chief minister Mamata Banerjee will also attend a convocation of Visva Bharati.After a night halt there, the Bangladesh prime minister would visit Kazi Nazrul University at Asansol where she will receive honorary D Litt from the authorities.Along with Sheikh Hasina veteran actress Sharmila Tagore would also be honoured with honorary doctorate.Tripathi, Ms Banerjee and state education minister Partha Chatterjee would also attend the convocation.Scientist Yusuf Hasan of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre will also be honoured by the university, sources said.last_img read more

first_imgInternational Organization for Migration (IOM) director general William Lacy Swing has called upon all for redoubling efforts to ensure that support for victims of trafficking becomes a key pillar in their work, reports UNB.”We must redouble our efforts to ensure that support for victims of trafficking becomes a key pillar in our work,” he said in an op-ed marking the World Day against Trafficking in Persons that falls on today, Monday.Swing said businesses should also ensure they have established feedback loops so that they can continually improve reporting mechanisms, protection for whistle-blowers, and prevention of further harm.”More and more companies are coming together to address the risks they face in supply chains, but remediation for victims of trafficking remains a new area of work for the private sector,” he wrote in the article titled “With Public and Private Sectors at Odds, Traffickers Win. Let’s work together to protect its victims.”Terming positive trends encouraging, he said much more needs to be done. “Today, I will focus on a key challenge, which I see as the next frontier in supply chain engagement: mobilizing the private sector to ensure that migrants who have been wronged receive the remedy and justice they deserve.”Beyond strengthening their due diligence, he said, companies can and must take responsibility for harm perpetrated against their workers and ensure that all possible steps are taken to assist victims of trafficking in their recovery – which they can do by working closely with governments, civil society organizations, international organizations, and the victims themselves.Swing said states bear the primary responsibility to address human trafficking and protect trafficked victims. “By establishing stronger connections between private sector and public efforts to help victims of trafficking, together we can do the work of rebuilding broken lives.”Earlier this year IOM, the UN Migration Agency, launched a set of practical guidelines for companies to address this challenge. In line with the United Nations’ “Protect, Respect, and Remedy” Framework, IOM’s Remediation Guidelines describe the many avenues that businesses can take to offer remediation to victims of exploitation, in partnership with local state and non-State actors.These routes include facilitating access to victim services and support systems such as medical or psychosocial care; relocating victims to new job environments; offering voluntary return to countries of origin; support for recovery, rehabilitation, and reintegration where possible, said the IOM chief.”But as we mark the World Day against Trafficking in Persons, we are also reminded, sadly, that migrants are too often exposed to disproportionate risks of exploitation and abuse when looking for better employment opportunities away from home,” Swing said.Every year, millions of migrants are trafficked within and across borders and find themselves trapped in forced labour.In some cases, men and women are coerced by force into work, enduring violence, threats or psychological manipulation.Often they find themselves indebted via unfair recruitment processes or employment conditions, all the while facing enormous pressures from their families and communities who may have gone into debt themselves, just to start their job search.Other forms of exploitation only slightly more benign;-having to toil under dangerous conditions, settling for menial wages, facing hidden deductions and unreasonable restrictions during both work and non-work hours.”These abuses, too, harm migrants and violate their rights,” Swing said adding that these types of abuse can occur all along an industry’s supply chain and can be easily concealed among layers of sub-contractors.He said trafficking in persons exists today in every country and every economic sector. “Whether the business is coffee, clothing or construction, this much is clear: no workplace or community is immune to human trafficking.””We must all insist that supply chains are free from human trafficking and other forms of exploitation,” Swing said.He said they are already seeing signs of change and a growing number of companies are taking action in their supply chains; more governments are developing new policies and regulatory mechanisms for greater business accountability.”Civil society also plays a critical role in advocating for migrants’ rights and ensuring they have access to the protection and assistance services they need,” he added.last_img read more

first_imgThe attacker who shot dead 39 people on New Year’s night at an Istanbul nightclub has been identified as an Uzbek jihadist who belongs to the extremist Islamic State (IS) group, Turkish press reports said.There had been confusion over the identity of the attacker—who remains on the run—with reports initially suggesting a Kyrgyz national and then a Uighur from China.But intelligence services and anti-terror police in Istanbul have now identified the man as a 34-year-old Uzbek who is part of a Central Asian IS cell, the Hurriyet daily and other Turkish newspapers reported.It said he has the code name of Ebu Muhammed Horasani within the IS extremist group. There was no official confirmation of the report.The killer slipped into the night after killing 27 foreigners and 12 Turkish nationals at the Reina nightclub in Istanbul just 75 minutes into 2017.Despite an intense manhunt, he remains on the run, with some reports saying that he is still believed to be in Istanbul.Turkish police had last week released images of the alleged killer, including a chilling silent video he purportedly took in central Istanbul with a selfie stick.Uzbekistan clamped down on militant Islam after the fall of the Soviet Union under the secular rule of its long-standing leader Islam Karimov who died in 2016.IS militants from Central Asia, including Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, as well as from Russia’s Muslim regions of Dagestan and Chechnya are believed to have played a key role in the triple suicide bombings and gun attack at Istanbul’s main airport in June.The IS extremist group claimed the Istanbul nightclub attack, the first time it has ever clearly claimed a major attack in the country despite being blamed for several strikes including the airport bombings.last_img read more

first_imgWENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOConnie De La Rosa holds baby Angel in the NICU at University Hospital. She’s the first participant in a new study of Family Nurture Intervention.Each year, 1 in 10 babies born in the U.S. spends time in the NICU, the neonatal intensive care unit. Years later, many of these children have developmental, learning or behavioral problems, including autism.A new study is designed to determine if different kinds of nurturing in the first few months of life could improve outcomes. San Antonio mothers and babies are taking part in the research. Baby Angel came into the world early, 11 weeks early to be exact, weighing less than four pounds.“He was so tiny and had all these wires on him and I was scared to hurt him,” said Angel’s mother Connie De La Rosa.De La Rosa spends as much time as she can with her son in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of San Antonio’s University Hospital.WENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOBaby Angel was born 11 weeks early. He’s spending time in University Hospital’s NICU until he’s ready to go home.Umber Darilek , RN, said there’s no playbook for mothers of tiny, sometimes sick babies.  No book to read, no real world advice from your grandmother on how to cope.“We see moms looking terrified,” Darilek commented. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.”That’s why Martha Welch, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York is studying an intervention called Family Nurture. Welch believes early physical trauma and a potential lack of emotional connection between mother and baby may set up these young patients for difficulties later.“They’re isolated,” Welch stated. “They’re not having social involvement. We think they are being adversely conditioned to human contact because so much of the contact is challenging. It’s tubes and IVs and skin pricks. Pre-term infants have a higher rate of risk for developmental problems including autism.”Welch says early in life, when babies cuddle in their mother’s arms, or nurse, or have eye contact, they develop a bond at the visceral level, in the autonomic nervous system that’s responsible for what we call “gut feelings.” That means later in life, you may feel calmer just by being around your mother.To help establish that connection in the NICU, nurture specialists help new moms with skin-to-skin holding, comforting touch, scent exchange, eye contact and vocal soothing.“We did a very successful first trial with amazing outcomes, totally different from the usual outcomes for pre-term infants in terms of cognition, language, risk for autism, behavior,” Welch said.Now, University Hospital is taking a page from Columbia’s playbook, conducting a family nurturing study of its own to try and replicate positive results for NICU babies.“It was like a light bulb. It was like ‘wow,’” said neonatologist Alice Gong, MD, of UT Health San Antonio.Gong said during her three decades of dealing with mother-baby interaction, she has witnessed the temper tantrums and intestinal issues that often plague NICU babies for years.“They’ve been sheltering their baby for so long,” Gong said of the new mothers. “They’re so scared they are going to die that they pretty much don’t mother them the same way they do their other children.”Gong is recruiting 50 moms and babies for her study. De La Rosa is the first.“She told me that I would help my baby connect,” De La Rosa commented. “I hold him skin to skin, talk to my baby, show him emotions. Now mommy instincts are kicking in.”Welch said science backs up her early positive results. By 18 months, one in four NICU babies has behaviors that fall somewhere on the autism spectrum. With Family Nurture Intervention, that number decreased to one in ten. The ultimate goal of these studies is to change the culture in NICUs around the country. Copyright 2017 KSTX-FM. To see more, visit KSTX-FM. Sharelast_img read more

first_imgSpace City FilmsAn astronaut on a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /09:36 X center_img Share Space City FilmsWhen you think about the dangers of a spacewalk, accidentally floating away from your ship or running out of air might come to mind — but not drowning.But that’s what almost happened to an astronaut on a spacewalk in 2013.A new documentary details what went wrong. It’s called EVA 23. EVA stands for extravehicular activity, NASA lingo for a spacewalk.It was July 2013, and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano were doing some pretty routine work outside the International Space Station.But things took a turn when Parmitano experienced something unusual: he felt water on the back of his neck.The incident wasn’t cause for panic. Perhaps the pouch containing his drinking water had leaked as they believed it had on a previous spacewalk.But, as time passed, more water began filling Parmitano’s helmet to the point where his eyes and nose were covered — only his mouth remained unobstructed so he could breathe.Space City FilmsItalian astronaut Luca Parmitano demonstrates how water behaves in zero gravity.Eventually the decision was made to end the EVA and return the station. But as he worked his way back in the darkness of space the water began moving as he moved, creating the fear he wouldn’t get back to the airlock before his helmet was completely filled.Space City FilmsNASA astronaut Chris Cassidy describes the problem that occurred with his colleague’s spacesuit, as documented in the film EVA 23.The story of what went wrong and how Parmitano survived with the help of Cassidy and his ISS crew mates makes for a harrowing reminder of the inherent dangers of space exploration.In the audio above, the film’s directors Phil Sexton and Austin Havican of the Clear Lake-based production company Space City Films tell Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty the story of EVA 23.The documentary is screening now at both the Kennedy Space Center and Space Center Houston.– / 8 Listenlast_img read more

first_img by NPR News Avie Schneider 8.23.19 1:28pm Updated at 11:35 a.m. ETSignaling the possibility of more interest-rate cuts, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the central bank will “act as appropriate” to sustain the economic expansion as the trade war with China takes a toll on global growth and the U.S. economy. In prepared remarks Friday to a Kansas City Fed gathering in Jackson Hole, Wyo., Powell said the economy faces “significant risks” and cited several developments that have roiled financial markets in recent weeks. Those developments include new U.S. tariffs on imports from China; signs of a global slowdown, namely in the economic powerhouses Germany and China; and the growing possibility that the United Kingdom will leave the European Union without a deal.”Trade policy uncertainty seems to be playing a role in the global slowdown and in weak manufacturing and capital spending in the United States,” Powell said. He said the U.S. economy has continued to perform well, driven by consumer spending, but job creation has slowed. “Based on our assessment of the implications of these developments, we will act as appropriate to sustain the expansion,” Powell said.Last month, the Fed cut interest rates for the first time in over a decade, lowering the cost of borrowing for credit cards, auto loans and mortgages. President Trump has repeatedly pressured the Fed to lower interest rates further to boost the economy, and this week, he called for a dramatic one-percentage-point cut. On Friday, Trump again tweeted his criticism of the central bank. “We have a very strong dollar and a very weak Fed. … My only question is, who is our bigger enemy, Jay Powell or Chairman Xi?” Trump’s tweets came shortly after China announced retaliatory tariffs against $75 billion in U.S. goods.In his remarks, Powell said that “while monetary policy is a powerful tool that works to support consumer spending, business investment, and public confidence, it cannot provide a settled rulebook for international trade.”He also addressed another issue on the mind of market watchers: whether the long U.S. expansion is leading banks and other financial firms to take more risks. “We have not seen unsustainable borrowing, financial booms, or other excesses of the sort that occurred at times [before the Great Recession], and I continue to judge overall financial stability risks to be moderate,” he said. “But we remain vigilant.”Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. More Rate Cuts? Powell Says Fed Is Ready To Help Economy… Manuel Balce Cenetalast_img read more

first_img Jeff Roberson Federal Judge Blocks Parts Of Missouri Law That Bans… by NPR News Bobby Allyn 8.27.19 4:47pm Updated at 4:46 p.m. ETPortions of a Missouri law banning abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy were blocked by a federal judge just a day before the legislation was to go into effect.U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs issued the order halting the law, whose provisions also call for physicians who perform an abortion after eight weeks to face possible prison time and have their license suspended or revoked. “While federal courts should generally be very cautious before delaying the effect of state laws, the sense of caution may be mitigated when the legislation seems designed, as here, as a protest against Supreme Court decisions,” Sachs wrote in his opinion.Sachs denied a full preliminary injunction on technical grounds, but his ruling achieved what he called the “desired result” sought by Planned Parenthood for now. He left in place — at least for now — prohibitions on abortion for reasons of race, sex or a suspected diagnosis of Down syndrome in the fetus.The legislation that Republican Gov. Mike Parson signed in May has an exception for medical emergencies, but not for victims of rape or incest. Planned Parenthood filed suit to halt the law last month, and its lawyers told the court that the legislation would mean “patients will be subject to significant and irreparable constitutional, medical, emotional, and other harms for which no adequate remedy at law exists.” In a statement, Kristan Hawkins of the anti-abortion rights group Students for Life called Tuesday’s ruling “a travesty of justice and an insult to the democratic process.”Alexis McGill Johnson, acting president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, welcomed the decision blocking a law that she called “harmful.” “What little abortion access in Missouri is left, will stay in place for the time being. In the meantime, we cannot ignore the part of this law that remains in place, which allows politicians to interfere with the patient-provider relationship,” she said. But Marjorie Dannenfelser, the president of the Susan B. Anthony List, an anti-abortion group, criticized the judge’s decision. “Missouri is a strongly pro-life state and lawmakers acted on their constituents’ will when they passed landmark protections for unborn children and their mothers,” Dannenfelser said. “We are extremely disappointed in today’s ruling which blocks limits on abortion, even late-term abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy when the child can feel excruciating pain.”Sachs’ ruling follows several other federal court decisions that have barred restrictive abortion laws from being implemented in states such as Ohio and Mississippi. Many of those laws criminalize the procedure as soon as heartbeat activity can be detected — as early as six weeks, which is before many women even know they’re pregnant.Anti-abortion-rights activists are hoping that legal challenges to one of the state laws will reach the U.S. Supreme Court in an effort to overturn the constitutional right to an abortion established by the landmark 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade.In its July lawsuit, the clinic, Reproductive Health Services of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region, said the Missouri law would “directly violate long-standing Supreme Court precedent,” calling it “Missouri’s unrelenting campaign to deny patients the health care they seek and to which they are entitled.”The state’s law was written with an eye toward banning the procedure as early as the courts will allow it. If an eight-week ban is thrown out, the law includes a cascading series of 14-, 18- and 20-week abortion bans that could take effect instead.”The hostility to, and refusal to comply with, the Supreme Court’s abortion jurisprudence is most obviously demonstrated in the attempt to push ‘viability’ protection downward in various weekly stages to 8 weeks,” the judge wrote, referring to the way the state crafted the law. In a separate process, the fate of the last remaining clinic that provides abortions in Missouri remains uncertain. Parson’s administration says the clinic is not meeting state health regulations. Planned Parenthood officials say they have done all they can to comply but that the rules are being arbitrarily enforced for political reasons. A hearing in that matter is planned for October.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more