first_imgYes, of course, Americans are dreamers.But he should finish the thought.For most dreamers, the United States is the only country they know.Dreamers are U.S. soldiers, high school valedictorians, the young couple living next door.Yes, Americans are dreamers — and dreamers are Americans.If only we had a president who understood as much.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:In his State of the Union address, President Donald Trump seemed intent on burying any chance of enacting legislation to protect the “dreamers.”Instead of reaching out to Democrats to fashion a readily achievable compromise, the president injected more ethno-nationalist venom into a debate he already has done much to poison. Eleven million immigrants are living in this country without legal documentation, but the vast majority of them are otherwise law-abiding.In fact, they are overwhelmingly employed, long-term residents who contribute to their communities in all manner of ways.That is especially true of the dreamers, young people brought to this country as children by their parents.Very few Americans want to see the dreamers rounded up and deported, so you’d think a president would search for common ground to prepare the way for their eventual path to citizenship.Instead, Trump chose in the most inflammatory way possible to associate immigrants with a horrific crime committed by a vicious gang.Rather than reminding Americans of their common roots as immigrants and stressing that immigration is the cornerstone of the American story, Trump vilified them.He would have Americans believe that compassionate treatment for unaccompanied minors who cross the border, often fleeing violence and poverty, or family-based immigration is somehow akin to acquiescing in the homicidal nihilism of MS-13.center_img Trump could have sought a constructive way forward.He could have urged Congress to forge a straightforward deal – a shield for the dreamers in return for border security.Some Democrats would be reluctant to give the president his “beautiful wall”; some Republicans would balk at “amnesty” for dreamers.But if Trump embraced the deal, so would Congress.Instead, he attempted to expropriate the grief of four of his guests in the gallery: parents still mourning the brutal 2016 murder of their teenage daughters on Long Island.That won’t earn him the moral high ground, but it may well deepen the nation’s divisions and further complicate the fate of nearly 2 million young immigrants about whom Trump has said, “I love these kids.”Maybe the saddest moment of the speech came when Trump tried to knock the dreamers off their sympathetic perch with the cleverly contemptuous line, “Americans are dreamers, too.”last_img read more

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion In an election year where the only real wisdom may actually come from the animated movie, “Despicable Me,” it’s been almost refreshing to hear and read (in your paper) about the ongoing saga regarding school tax exemptions for veterans.While, for most school districts, this issue would appear on the surface to be a slam-dunk no-brainer favoring our vets, I have to applaud former Duanesburg school Superintendent Christine Crowley for her insight and willingness to stand up for the larger interests of the district. It is wise to fully consider the effect of such a benefit on the whole of the tax base.For my part, it’s a head scratch, since I’ve never really viewed prior military service as a financial handicap generally, although I have great respect for those who have served and have personally helped some vets who have needed it. Perhaps it’s not really about the money and just an effort to take full advantage of available benefits. That’s hard to argue against, I guess.Regarding the upcoming election (or is it choice of a degree of evils), I’ve never been much of a minion and had hoped for a much better Republican option. I’ll go with the only one who understands what a Democratic republic is. Yeah, it’s not Trump.Jeff Schworm DuanesburgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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first_imgSome 56 million people in Hubei have been under virtual lockdown since last week, with its capital Wuhan at the heart of the health emergency.In Hangzhou, some 175 kilometres (110 miles) southwest of Shanghai, green fences blocked streets near the headquarters of Chinese tech giant Alibaba as a fighter jet circled overhead.Alibaba, one of the world’s most valuable companies, appeared shut down, while deliverymen moved in and out of the nearby fenced-in residential areas to drop off groceries. Many people were also seen going out.The firm is inside one of three districts where some three million people were told this week that only one person per household would be allowed outside every two days to buy necessities. Millions more people have been ordered to stay indoors as China battles to curb the spread of a new virus that authorities said Wednesday has already killed nearly 500 people.With more than 24,000 cases in China, a growing number of cities have been imposing a range of restrictions in recent days far from central Hubei province, the epicentre of the outbreak, as authorities struggle to contain the virus.Global concerns have risen as more countries found cases that were not imported from China and 10 people tested positive for the virus on a ship quarantined off the coast of Japan. “Please don’t go out, don’t go out, don’t go out!” blared a message on a loudspeaker urging people to wear masks, wash their hands regularly and report any people who are from Hubei — a common fear in other parts of the country that people from the province might infect others.At least three other cities in eastern Zhejiang province — Taizhou, Wenzhou and parts of Ningbo — have imposed the same measures, affecting some 18 million people.Similar policies were encouraged by authorities in two cities as far as China’s northeasternmost province, Heilongjiang, and a handful of others along the east coast.In Henan province, which borders Hubei, a district in the city of Zhumadian decided that only one person could leave each household every five days. Residents there have been offered cash rewards for informing on people from Hubei.- Global jitters -The disease is believed to have emerged in December in a Wuhan market that sold wild animals, and spread rapidly as people travelled for the Lunar New Year holiday in January.The death toll has steadily increased, rising to 490 in China after Hubei reported 65 more people had died.Most deaths have been in the province and officials have noted that the death rate, at around two percent, is below the mortality rate of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.The new coronavirus is from the same family of pathogens as the one that causes SARS, which killed some 800 people in 2002-2003.The epidemic has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare a global health emergency, several governments to institute travel restrictions, and airlines to suspend flights to and from China.United and American Airlines said Wednesday they have added Hong Kong to their China flight suspensions.On Wednesday Japan said at least 10 passengers on a cruise ship carrying 3,711 people have the virus.Japanese authorities began testing those on board after a former passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong was diagnosed with the illness.British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab on Tuesday advised Britons to leave China “if they can”, to minimise their risk of exposure to the virus.- ‘Window of opportunity’ -But the WHO said Tuesday that dramatic measures taken by China offered a chance to halt transmission.WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that the great majority of cases are in China.”That doesn’t mean that it won’t get worse. But for sure we have a window of opportunity to act,” he said.Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand all reported new infections not imported from China on Tuesday.Two fatalities have been reported outside the mainland, in Hong Kong and the Philippines.Semi-autonomous Hong Kong has closed all but two land crossings with the Chinese mainland.As countries battle to keep the virus off their shores, the WHO chief accused wealthy countries of falling short on their duties in sharing data.”Of the 176 cases reported outside China so far, WHO has received complete case report forms for only 38 percent,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

first_imgRepublican Senator Mitt Romney issued a scathing criticism of Donald Trump on Wednesday as he broke with his party and voted to convict the US president for abuse of power in his impeachment trial.Romney was the only lawmaker to break with his party as the Senate acquitted Trump on impeachment charges stemming from his efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden, the former vice president seeking the Democratic nomination to face Trump in the Nov. 3 election.”Corrupting an election to keep one’s self in office is perhaps the most abusive and destructive violation of one’s oath of office that I can imagine,” Romney said in an emotional speech on the Senate floor. Romney voted ‘guilty’ on the first impeachment charge, abuse of power, siding with the Senate’s 45 Democrats and two independents. He voted ‘not guilty’ on the second charge, obstruction of Congress.He is the first senator in US history to vote to convict a member of his own party in an impeachment trial. President Bill Clinton was acquitted in 1999 and Andrew Johnson in 1868.Romney was the Republican presidential nominee in 2012 and was elected to represent Utah in the Senate in 2018.Following the vote, Trump released a video that referred to Romney as a “Democrat secret asset” and noted his 2012 loss to Democratic President Barack Obama. Other Republican officials, including the head of the Utah state party and Republican National Committee chairwoman Ronna McDaniel – Romney’s niece – said they disagreed with his choice.But fellow Senate Republicans declined to criticize him.”I think Mitt’s a person of integrity,” Senator Ron Johnson told reporters. “He voted his conscience.”A former governor of Massachusetts, Romney won his 2018 Senate election with a comfortable 63 percent. Up for re-election in 2024, he could conceivably face a primary challenge in Utah.Some of his constituents came to his defense on Wednesday.”I’m proud of him for speaking up,” said Stacey Maxwell, a registered independent who owns a Salt Lake City coffee shop.MORMON FAITHAt the start of his floor speech, Romney appeared to choke back tears when he noted that as a Mormon, “I am profoundly religious. My faith is at the heart of who I am.”Romney, 72, served as a missionary in France as a young man and served as a church leader when he lived in Boston. He has generally downplayed his faith in his political career.”The president is guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust,” Romney declared.Referring to Trump’s contention that he has conducted himself in a “perfect” manner, Romney said, “What he did was not perfect. No, it was a flagrant assault on our electoral rights, our national security and our fundamental values.”This was not the first time Romney and Trump have tangled.In a tweet last year, the president called Romney a “pompous ass” after he criticized Trump for urging Ukraine to investigate Biden.Romney criticized Trump as a “fraud” during the 2016 presidential campaign, but met with Trump after his victory as he was looking to fill top administration jobs. Trump ended up not hiring Romney for any position.Topics :last_img read more