first_imgDr. Jonathan Epstein, vice president for science and outreach at the EcoHealth Alliance, a conservation organization, said he had not seen any details so far, but, “Someone would have to release the sequences soon, and the evolutionary biologists will be all over it.”On Twitter, Emma Hodcroft, a geneticist at the University of Basel, Switzerland, who is tracking the spread of the novel coronavirus, urged caution. “Don’t panic,” Dr. Hodcroft tweeted. “Scientists will update when we have more info.” Without published reports on the nature of the mutation or how the virus variant was tested, research scientists outside Denmark who study the virus were left somewhat in the dark. Dr. Stanley Perlman, a microbiologist at the University of Iowa and a specialist on the novel coronavirus, said he could not evaluate the Danish statements without more information.- Advertisement – The Danish government will slaughter millions of mink at more than 1,000 farms, citing concerns that a mutation in the novel coronavirus that has infected the mink could possibly interfere with the effectiveness of a vaccine for humans.Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen made the announcement at a news conference on Wednesday. There are 15 million or more mink in Denmark, which is one of the world’s major exporters of mink furs. She said the armed forces would be involved in the culling of mink.- Advertisement – Kare Molbak, the head of the State Serum Institute, the government’s public health and infectious disease arm, warned at the news conference that a mutation could interfere with the effectiveness of future vaccines. The government has notified the World Health Organization of the virus mutation, and also said 12 people in its Jutland region are known to have it and that it shows a weak reaction to antibodies, according to news reports.The W. H.O. acknowledged by email that it had been “informed by Denmark of a number of persons infected with coronavirus from mink, with some genetic changes in the virus.” The W.H.O. said that Denmark was “investigating the epidemiological and virological significance of these findings, and culling the mink population. We are in touch with them to find more about this event.” In September, Dutch scientists reported in a paper that has not yet been peer-reviewed that the virus was jumping between mink and humans. In Denmark, the government is describing a version of the virus that migrated from mink to humans.center_img – Advertisement – The coronavirus mutates slowly but regularly, and a different variant of the virus would not, in itself, be cause for concern, experts have said.Researchers have studied one mutation labeled D614G in the spike protein of the virus which may increase transmission. They concluded that there is no evidence so far that the particular mutation increases virulence or would affect the workings of a vaccine.Denmark had already begun killing all mink at 400 farms which were either infected, or close enough to infected farms to cause concern. The killing of all mink will wipe out the industry, perhaps for years.Mink are in the weasel family, along with ferrets, which are easily infected with the coronavirus. Ferrets appear to suffer mild symptoms. Mink, which are kept in crowded conditions ideal for spreading a virus, can become quite sick and die. Mink have been infected in other countries as well, including the Netherlands and some U.S. states. Thousands of mink were killed in Utah because of a coronavirus outbreak, but authorities there said there it did not appear that the mink transmitted the virus to humans, but the opposite.Many conservation scientists have become concerned about the spread of the virus to animal populations, like chimpanzees, which are believed to be susceptible, although cases have not been identified yet. Groups of researchers are testing bats and pets and wild animals in the United States.Researchers are also concerned about what occurs when the virus moves from one species to another and may acquire changes, or mutations. While most such changes are not likely to be a problem for humans, there is always the chance that strains of the virus could become more infectious or more virulent.Animal Protection Denmark, an advocacy group, recommended a long-term solution to the problem of mink and coronavirus: “The right decision would be to end mink farming entirely and help farmers into other occupation that does not jeopardize public health and animal welfare.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

first_imgThis is something that Gareth Hickey has been doing for the last several months to shore up his start-up Noa, which creates audio versions of news content and works with several large news publishers.“We’ve had to put in place a review of all of our data transfer agreements that we have with publishers and other parties that are based in the U.K.,” he told CNBC. “There’s obviously been a cost associated with that because we don’t know what way it’s going to be left and we don’t want to be left scrambling.”Much like customs arrangements, Hickey said some start-ups may be putting their data transfer arrangement off to the last minute.“Just to call a spade a spade, it’s probably the case that some start-ups are going to accept the risk and not put anything in place and if data adequacy is not granted to the U.K. then they’re staring at an unknown.” “Even if we get a deal, we’re not in a scenario that we just carry on trading as we are now. On Jan. 1 there is a huge amount of extra administrative burden and complexity in trading.”One step in getting prepared is securing an Economic Operators’ Registration and Identification (EORI) number from Revenue, the Irish tax authority, which is required for anyone importing and exporting out of the EU. But it remains unclear if all the businesses that need one have obtained it.Last year, Revenue contacted around 90,000 businesses that it identified as possibly needing the registration. A spokesperson for Revenue said that over the last month the agency has been carrying out further contact with around 14,000 businesses.FatigueBrian Keegan, director of public policy at Chartered Accountants Ireland, said that drawn out negotiations and extended deadlines has caused some weariness among businesses.“There’s been an incredible amount of Brexit fatigue. We’ve been marched up to the top of the hill and marched down again so often,” he said.Companies could run the risk of that fatigue getting the best of them come Jan. 1, he said.“We’re not entirely clear if tariffs are going to be applied and secondly if they are applied, the extent to which they’re going to apply between the U.K. and Northern Ireland,” he told CNBC.“While there is a protocol in place to ensure that there is no tariff border, no hard border on the island of Ireland, it’s still very unclear how any of this is going to work and we’re less than 70 days away from the shutters coming down,” he said.Keegan added that he’s hopeful some kind agreement can be made at this stage, which can be expanded upon beyond January.“If Europe is struggling with its trading agreements with a G-7 country, that’s really significant.”Data flowsThe movement of physical goods is one thing, but questions still hang over the flows of data after December.The U.K. will need to gain an adequacy agreement with the EU — which effectively says the jurisdictions are on equal footing — as well, to ensure personal data can flow.Last month, the Irish Council for Civil Liberties argued that the U.K.’s data protection enforcement isn’t up to standard and said in a letter to the European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, that there is an “inescapable conclusion” that the U.K. shouldn’t be granted adequacy.If no such agreement is reached, companies will have to make separate data transfer arrangements with customers and partners. An employee enters sliding doors decorated with the stars of the European Union (EU) flag at the Berlaymont building, headquarters of the European Commission (EC), in Brussels, Belgium, on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. It took 32 months, two prime ministers, and nearly 30 votes in Parliament to extricate Britain from the European Union and the hardest part of the negotiations hasn’t even started.Bloomberg DUBLIN — Customs capacity will be a major hurdle for many Irish businesses that trade with the U.K., regardless of whether a deal is struck with the EU by the end of the year.That’s according to Ian Talbot, chief executive of business group Chambers Ireland, who said that while the Irish government committed to hiring extra personnel to handle customs with the U.K., many small businesses are unprepared for the new responsibilities that will be placed on them.“You could end up getting to a customs point and finding your documentation wasn’t correctly prepared and you can’t proceed,” Talbot said.- Advertisement – For many SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises), especially in the agriculture and food industries, any delays could be disastrous.“We just don’t know how this is going to play out at borders. How lenient for example borders might be for the first few weeks and months as everyone gets used to this. That will be a big question in our minds. Will a minor documentation error cause a fail or will some discretion be allowed for a period of time?” Talbot added that regardless of the deal talks on tariffs and quotas, there will be extra obligations on businesses.   – Advertisement – – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

first_img– Advertisement – Savchenko let slip in October that Stause was fielding DMs from interested hockey players after her breakup from the This Is Us star, 43. “Stop it! … Yes, they have,” she told Us. “But to be honest with you, I’m so busy with the show so you know, I am actually like super looking forward to that as soon as this journey’s over. I hope it’s not over soon, but conversations have been started that I’m looking forward to seeing where that goes after this is all over.”She added: “But right now, it’s too much all at once. I’m gonna focus on my contemporary and my cha-chas.”- Advertisement – Earlier in the day, the professional dancer announced their separation on her Instagram Story. “After 14 years of marriage with my deepest sadness our road is coming to an end,” she revealed.Savchenko, for his part, shared a lengthier statement with a focus on the estranged couple’s daughters, Olivia, 10, and Zlata, 3. “It is with a heavy heart that I tell you my wife and I are parting ways after 14 years of marriage,” the 37-year-old choreographer told Us Weekly. “We still intend to coparent our wonderful children together who we love so dearly, and we will strive to continue to be the best parents that we can to them. We ask that you respect our family’s need for privacy and healing during this time.”Elena Samodanova Shares Cryptic Quote After Gleb Savchenko SplitGleb Savchenko and Elena Samodanova at The iHeartRadio Music Awards on March 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Broadimage/ShutterstockThe Dancing With the Stars pro and his partner, Chrishell Stause, were eliminated from the ABC reality series on Monday, November 2. The Selling Sunset star, 39, is navigating divorce herself, having split from husband Justin Hartley in November 2019.- Advertisement – Stause and Savchenko bonded during the process, but they also had their bumps in the road. She noted last month that he gave her flowers after their “first fight.”“If apologies look like THIS, I guess it’s not so bad!!” she wrote via Instagram. “We both care so much and I love the passion he brings to what he does. We are working on me picking up some of his strict Russian nature, and I am softening him up with a little southern charm.”Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! A telltale sign of a messy breakup. Elena Samodanova hinted that her split from husband Gleb Savchenko was not amicable shortly after the news broke.Samodanova, 36, shared a cryptic quote via Instagram on Friday, November 6. “I don’t hate you,” the post read. “I’m just disappointed you turned into everything you said you’d never be.” She added a lone broken-heart emoji as her caption.- Advertisement –last_img read more

first_imgSpider-Man: Miles Morales is out now on the PlayStation 4 and the PlayStation 5, and it continues the story of the titular Afro-Latino teenager, who first revealed that he had powers like Peter Parker in a post-credits scene in Marvel’s Spider-Man. And just like Insomniac Games’ original Spider-Man game, Spider-Man: Miles Morales also has two post-credits scenes. The first of them bears no connection to what happens in the new Spider-Man game and instead builds on the post-credits scene from Marvel’s Spider-Man, setting up Marvel’s Spider-Man 2 in the process. The second post-credits scene touches upon the ending of the Spider-Man: Miles Morales story and functions as an epilogue.Review: Spider-Man: Miles Morales Is Hanging by a Thread- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Warning: spoilers ahead for Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales.Spider-Man: Miles Morales post-credits sceneThe two-and-half-minute long Spider-Man: Miles Morales post-credits opens at New York’s Trinity Church. Miles looks out at the city before crouching down and placing the “Spacebound Young Researchers Award” — he won it with former best friend Phin Mason — on one of the outer platforms of the Trinity Church in her memory. The church was a favourite childhood haunt for the nerdy duo, as is revealed during Spider-Man: Miles Morales when the two meet there to find some middle ground.It’s clear that Phin’s death is deeply affecting Miles. On one hand, she was the Tinkerer, the leader of the high-tech criminal army the Underground that had brought war to Harlem. But at the same time, she sacrificed herself to save Harlem from the blast of the Roxxon reactor. Miles brings up his conflicting thoughts on a call with his mother Rio Morales and wonders why Phin would do that, despite losing her brother Rick to Roxxon’s experimental tech, which led her on her vengeance quest to begin with.Miles’ mother gives Miles some great advice with her response: “People are messy. Take your uncle Aaron [Davis aka the Prowler]. He’s the reason [Roxxon CEO Simon] Krieger is in jail, and he helped us get people out of Harlem. But every time I look at him, I think of all the pain he put your dad through. You don’t need to make a judgment on Phin’s life, mijo [my son], or her death. Just remember who she was and why you loved her.”Spider-Man: Miles Morales costs Rs. 3,999 / $50 on PS4 and PS5. Warning: spoilers ahead for Marvel’s Spider-Man.Spider-Man: Miles Morales mid-credits sceneThe minute-long Spider-Man: Miles Morales mid-credits sequence takes place entirely from the first-person point of view of Harry Osborn, who was seen in the Marvel’s Spider-Man post-credits scene. Harry is still floating in that green liquid and still has a black-coloured Venom-like symbiote crawling all over his arms and legs. Unlike last time, he seems to be conscious, with the radio — talking about the events of Spider-Man: Miles Morales — filtering through the glass cabinet Harry is being kept in.For those who’ve forgotten why Harry is in a suspended state, that’s because he suffers from Oshtoran Syndrome, a rare heritable neurological disorder, just as his mother Emily Osborn. Harry and his father Norman Osborn lost her when Harry was just 15, and after Harry’s condition became critical, Norman decided to pursue an experimental medical treatment that would take several years. Harry agreed and that’s how he ended up with a symbiote attached to him.- Advertisement – In the new Spider-Man: Miles Morales mid-credits scene, Norman soon walks in and the doctor gives him a quick report, noting that Harry’s vitals are good and brain activity is normal. Norman laments that he’s been in there a long time and then asks the doctor to pull him out. The doctor protests but Norman is having none of it, and demands him to get Harry out “now”. Norman then walks towards his son and nods his head, in a way that suggests he’s missed him. Harry is his only family, after all.spider man miles morales tinkerer phin mason spider man miles morales tinkerer phin masonPhin Mason / Tinkerer in Spider-Man: Miles MoralesPhoto Credit: Insomniac Games- Advertisement –last_img read more

first_imgBannon suggested in a video posted on November 5 that FBI Director Christopher Wray and government infectious diseases expert Anthony Fauci should be beheaded, saying they had been disloyal to US President Donald Trump, who last week lost his re-election bid to Biden.“I’d put the heads on pikes. Right. I’d put them at the two corners of the White House as a warning to federal bureaucrats. You either get with the program or you are gone,” Bannon said in the video.Facebook removed the video but left up Bannon’s page, which has about 1,75,000 followers. Twitter banned Bannon last week over the same content.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg told an all-staff meeting on Thursday that former Trump White House adviser Steve Bannon had not violated enough of the company’s policies to justify his suspension when he urged beheading two senior US officials, according to a recording heard by Reuters.Zuckerberg acknowledged criticism of Facebook by President-elect Joe Biden but said the company shared some of the Biden team’s same concerns about social media. He urged employees not to jump to conclusions about how the new administration might approach regulation of social media companies.- Advertisement – Avaaz said seven of the largest pages had amassed nearly 2.5 million followers. Stone said Facebook had removed “several clusters of activity for using inauthentic behaviour tactics to artificially boost how many people saw their content.”Bannon could not immediately be reached for comment.Zuckerberg spoke on the issue at a weekly forum with Facebook employees where he is sometimes asked to defend content and policy decisions. A staff member had asked why Bannon had not been banned.Another employee asked how Facebook was handling criticism of Facebook by Biden and members of his team. Biden told the New York Times in December last year that he had “never been a fan of Facebook” and considered Zuckerberg “a real problem.”The incoming administration was “not monolithic,” Zuckerberg said. “Just because some people might talk in a way that’s more antagonistic to us, it doesn’t necessarily mean that speaks for what the whole group or whole administration is going to stand for.”Arrested in August, Bannon has pleaded not guilty to charges of defrauding hundreds of thousands of donors to the $25 million (roughly Rs. 200 crores) “We Build the Wall” campaign. Bannon has dismissed the charges as politically motivated.As Trump’s chief White House strategist, Bannon helped articulate Trump’s “America First” policy. Trump fired him in August 2017, ending Bannon’s turbulent tenure.© Thomson Reuters 2020Which is the best TV under Rs. 25,000? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. “We have specific rules around how many times you need to violate certain policies before we will deactivate your account completely,” Zuckerberg said. “While the offenses here, I think, came close to crossing that line, they clearly did not cross the line.”Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said the company would take further action against Bannon’s page “if there are additional violations.”Last Friday, Facebook took down a network of other Bannon-linked pages that were pushing false claims about the presidential election, after they were flagged to the world’s biggest social media company by activist group Avaaz.- Advertisement –last_img read more