first_imgLaunched back in January, Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 will go on sale again on Flipkart and Mi.com today. The sale like always will commence at 12 noon. Apart from the two online stores, Redmi Note 4 is also available on Xiaomi’s first Mi Home in India, which is located in Bengaluru’s Phoenix Marketcity Mall.To recall, Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 was launched in three variants in India. The first variant comes with 2GB RAM and 32GB storage available at Rs 9,999. The second variant packs 3GB RAM and 32GB storage priced at Rs 10,999, while the third one features 4GB RAM with 64GB storage memory which is available at Rs 12,999. Further, The Redmi Note 4 is available in four colour variants in India – gold, grey, matte black, and silver.According to the latest report by International Data Corporation (IDC) Redmi Note 4 is the highest shipped smartphone in India in Q1 of 2017, which makes Xiaomi the second largest smartphone manufacturer in India. The IDC report further states, “Two new launches – Redmi Note 4 and Redmi 4A, in the first quarter of the year not only drove the volume growth for Xiaomi but also helped vendor to lead online smartphone shipments with 40.6 per cent share.””In the first of quarter of 2017, Redmi Note 4 became the highest shipped smartphone in India. This smartphone replaced Samsung Galaxy J2 which was the top model back in Q4 2016,” adds IDC.In terms of specifications, Redmi Note 4 sports a 5.5-inch full-HD with 1080×1920 pixels resolution and 2.5D curved glass IPS display. Further, the smartphone runs MIUI 8 based on Android 6.0 Marshmallow and is powered by Snapdragon 625. The smartphone is available in two RAM variants — 3GB and 4GB of RAM memory.advertisementOn the camera front, the Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 features a 13-megapixel camera on the rear, which is further coupled with PDAF (phase detection autofocus), an f/2.0 aperture, 77-degree wide angle lens, and also dual-tone LED flash. Note 4 further sports a 5-megapixel selfie shooter which comes coupled with an 85-degree wide angle lens. Further, the device is backed by a 4100mAh battery.Also Read: Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 becomes the most shipped smartphone in India in Q1 2017: IDCAlso Read: Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 review: Raising the barlast_img read more

first_imgCoach Cal whispering something into Tyler Ulis' ear.LAWRENCE, KS – JANUARY 30: Head coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats talks with Tyler Ulis #3 during the final minutes of overtime in the game against the Kansas Jayhawks at Allen Fieldhouse on January 30, 2016 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)Kentucky had little difficulty getting past Tennessee Tuesday night. After a close first half, the Wildcats (26-0, 13-0 SEC) blew by the Volunteers (14-11, 6-7 SEC) in the final 20 minutes, winning, 66-48. The blowout victory did not come without some physicality, though. Kentucky freshman guard Tyler Ulis appeared to take a hard shot to the face from a Tennessee guard in the first half. Check out this play: Did anyone see this except @BraxtonDsnyder? pic.twitter.com/BdzD94RdK0— Aaron’s Right Shoe (@AaronsRightShoe) February 18, 2015Was it a punch? A shove? Just incidental contact? It’s tough to tell. Whatever it was, it’s something you usually see a foul called for, and there was no whistle blown last night. [KSR]last_img read more

Tuesday’s match to watch is Italy vs. Uruguay, essentially a must-win duel (for Uruguay at least) between the 16th- and 10th-best sides in the world according to ESPN’s Soccer Power Index (SPI). A surprisingly close second? Costa Rica-England, which features a group leader and an eliminated team with nothing but pride to play for. In between, there’s plenty of action in Group C, where every team is technically alive and fighting to advance to the Round of 16.Costa Rica vs. England: 12 p.m. EDTItaly vs. Uruguay: 12 p.m. EDTGreece vs. Ivory Coast: 4 p.m. EDTJapan vs. Colombia: 4 p.m. EDTIN BRIEFSee our World Cup predictions for the latest probabilities.IN DEPTHIt’s tough to overstate what’s on the line in Tuesday’s match between Uruguay and Italy. Both teams are tied for second place in Group D with three points apiece, although Italy holds the all-important tiebreaker with a superior goal differential.Group D’s leader, Costa Rica, won its first two matches and has guaranteed itself a spot in the next round, so there’s only one unclaimed berth left in the group. Uruguay is the favorite to win the match by SPI, about 41 percent to 30 percent (with a 29 percent probability of a draw), and that’s not because of defense. Neither team has been particularly dominant at that end of the pitch, but Uruguay has allowed four goals in the tournament, including three to a Costa Rican side that’s far from a scoring juggernaut.Instead, the odds are in Uruguay’s favor mostly because — theoretically speaking — it has the better offense, led by the sublime forward Luis Suarez. After not appearing at all in Uruguay’s opening loss against Costa Rica, Suarez returned from a knee injury Thursday to score a pair of goals and help sink England’s World Cup hopes. He’ll continue to get support from the passing of Edinson Cavani, Cristian Rodríguez and Nicolás Lodeiro. But Suarez aside, La Celeste has had some difficulty generating consistent scoring chances in the tournament so far, and Uruguay will have a hard time winning if it continues to muster only 8.5 shots per game.Meanwhile, Italy was expected to be in the middle of the pack offensively before the tournament, and it’s played largely to form. Mario Balotelli has been his customarily uneven self; he picked up a goal and caused all manner of havoc against England, then promptly had a terrible game (three offsides, one yellow card and only one shot on target) against Costa Rica. Andrea Pirlo’s passing remains superb, and the Italian offense plays with an efficient style — forgoing crosses in favor of passes through the middle of the pitch — but it’s also had a lot of trouble sustaining attacks in the opponent’s third.Uruguay might not be the best opponent for the pass-heavy Italian style; it’s been one of the best defenses at intercepting passes so far in the World Cup. Watch for the stark contrast between Italy’s ball control-centric offensive game and the more direct Uruguayan style, which sacrifices possession in favor of the long ball, and attempts to win by attacking from the wings and winning balls in the air. Each approach represents one side of a fierce philosophical divide in soccer, and which one prevails will go a long way toward determining who advances out of Group D.It’s worth noting that our World Cup odds list Italy as the favorites to advance despite Uruguay being favored in this specific match. That’s because in the event of a draw, Italy would claim second place in the group on goal differential. An Uruguayan win is the single most likely outcome of the game, but there’s also a 59 percent chance that Uruguay doesn’t win the match and fails to advance. Confused yet?The second-best game of the day (at least according to our method of taking the harmonic mean of the two competitors’ SPI scores) is Costa Rica vs. England. It’s a fine matchup, but the stakes are as low as it gets for both teams. Costa Rica has clinched a berth in the knockout round (and has an 89 percent chance of winning Group D), and England has been mathematically eliminated.The remaining games have some implications for the next round, though Colombia has already punched its ticket into the Round of 16 and Japan’s odds are slim. Greece vs. Ivory Coast offers a bit more to play for: Greece has a better than 19 percent chance of making it to the knockout stage, but SPI also predicts the match to be a dreary, low-scoring affair.YESTERDAYThe Netherlands avoided a matchup with Brazil in the Round of 16 by defeating Chile 2-0 in their Group B finale Monday. The Netherlands’ chance of advancing to the quarterfinals is now 69 percent, while Chile must face Brazil on Sunday with odds of 26 percent. The Dutch would have been an underdog against Brazil, advancing 23 percent of the time.For the first 75 minutes Monday, the Netherlands struggled to get opportunities, completing two of 16 passes into the attacking penalty area and creating four total chances. Then in the final 15 minutes plus stoppage time, the Dutch completed two of four passes into the attacking penalty area, creating two chances and scoring on both. Substitute Leroy Fer gave the Netherlands the lead less than two minutes after entering the match with just his second touch of the game.The Netherlands struggled not only on passes into the box; Dutch players completed 63.9 percent of passes overall, their worst rate in a World Cup match in at least 50 years. In their first two wins, the Dutch completed 78.9 percent of their passes.Chile had the majority of possession, with 657 touches to the Netherlands’ 395, but couldn’t get anything going in the Netherlands’ penalty area. Chile managed seven shots, one of which was on target, and had less than 2 percent of its overall touches (13) in the attacking penalty area.Part of the trouble could have been that Chile was fouled 26 times, the most in a match in this year’s World Cup. Forward Alexis Sanchez was fouled nine times, two more than anyone else this tournament.Later, Mexico and Croatia were scoreless through 70 minutes, and Mexico was poised to become the first team under the current tournament format to advance to the knockout round scoring exactly one goal. But then El Tri scored three times in 11 minutes to propel Mexico to the knockout round and a matchup with the Netherlands.Two of Mexico’s three goals came from headers — a rarity, as El Tri scored two headed goals in its past two World Cup appearances combined. Mexico’s third goal came from Javier Hernandez, who’s come off the bench in each of Mexico’s three matches and ended his career-long scoreless streak for his country Monday. His goal was one of 21 scored by substitutes this tournament, the most ever in a group stage (substitutes were first allowed in 1970). —  Jacob Nitzberg, senior stats analyst, ESPNOFF THE PITCHBelieve it or not, Italian food just wouldn’t be the same without its relationship with Uruguay. Although the country is known for its carb-heavy offerings, the roles of meat and fish in the Italian diet can’t be discounted. According to 2012 data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 45 percent of Uruguay’s exports to Italy were bovine meat, followed by frozen fish fillets, at 16 percent. Follow the trade route in the opposite direction, and Italian exports to Uruguay run the gamut. They’re mostly concentrated in machinery — sewing machinery, tractors, furnaces, etc. But perfumery, cosmetics,and eyewear play a noticeable role as well. And, of course, it wouldn’t be Italian trade if it didn’t include pasta, of which Italy sent a healthy $2.4 million worth to Uruguay. — Hayley MunguiaFURTHER READINGAdvancement Scenarios For Groups C And DWatching the USMNT on Copacabana Beach in RioWorld Cup Pass & Move: I Can’t Believe That We Did Draw! read more

first_imgThe Egyptian beat Gareth Bale and Cristiano Ronaldo to win the prestigious award for scoring the “most aesthetically pleasing goal” in world footballEgyptian footballer Mohamed Salah has beaten Juventus’ Cristiano Ronaldo and Real Madrid’s Gareth Bale to win this year’s FIFA The Best Puskas Award.The Liverpool player won the award after scoring against Everton in the English Premier League. He weaved through multiple defenders before curling the ball into the top corner.Bale and Ronaldo scored a similar overhead kick but did not win this time.Salah is the first Egyptian to win the award from FIFA that has been delivering them since 2009.The forward has been with Liverpool since the second semester of 2017. He has scored 35 goals in just 42 matches.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.He’s currently battling criticism from many after he hasn’t been the same since his shoulder injury in the last 2017-2018 UEFA Champions League Final.Past winners: 2009: Cristiano Ronaldo – Manchester United 2010: Hamit Altintop – Turkey 2011: Neymar Jr. – Santos 2012: Miroslav Stoch – Fenerbahce 2013: Zlatan Ibrahimovic – Sweden 2014: James Rodriguez – Colombia 2015: Wendell Lira – Goianesia 2016: Mohd Faiz Subri – Penang 2017: Olivier Giroud – Arsenal 2018: Mohamed Salah – LiverpoolThe goal that won @MoSalah the #Puskás#TheBest #FIFAFootballAwards pic.twitter.com/KwAvwA8zGK— Premier League USA (@PLinUSA) September 24, 2018last_img read more

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina and veteran Indian actress Sharmila Tagore will be honoured with honorary Doctor of Literature (D.Litt) at a convocation of Kazi Nazrul University in Asansol on 26 May, reports webindia123.com quoting official sources on Wednesday.The prime minister is expected to reach West Bengal on 25 May for the inauguration of the Bangladesh centre at Santiniketan, Bolpur, where Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, Bengal governor KS Tripathi and chief minister Mamata Banerjee will also attend a convocation of Visva Bharati.After a night halt there, the Bangladesh prime minister would visit Kazi Nazrul University at Asansol where she will receive honorary D Litt from the authorities.Along with Sheikh Hasina veteran actress Sharmila Tagore would also be honoured with honorary doctorate.Tripathi, Ms Banerjee and state education minister Partha Chatterjee would also attend the convocation.Scientist Yusuf Hasan of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre will also be honoured by the university, sources said.last_img read more

first_imgThe attacker who shot dead 39 people on New Year’s night at an Istanbul nightclub has been identified as an Uzbek jihadist who belongs to the extremist Islamic State (IS) group, Turkish press reports said.There had been confusion over the identity of the attacker—who remains on the run—with reports initially suggesting a Kyrgyz national and then a Uighur from China.But intelligence services and anti-terror police in Istanbul have now identified the man as a 34-year-old Uzbek who is part of a Central Asian IS cell, the Hurriyet daily and other Turkish newspapers reported.It said he has the code name of Ebu Muhammed Horasani within the IS extremist group. There was no official confirmation of the report.The killer slipped into the night after killing 27 foreigners and 12 Turkish nationals at the Reina nightclub in Istanbul just 75 minutes into 2017.Despite an intense manhunt, he remains on the run, with some reports saying that he is still believed to be in Istanbul.Turkish police had last week released images of the alleged killer, including a chilling silent video he purportedly took in central Istanbul with a selfie stick.Uzbekistan clamped down on militant Islam after the fall of the Soviet Union under the secular rule of its long-standing leader Islam Karimov who died in 2016.IS militants from Central Asia, including Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, as well as from Russia’s Muslim regions of Dagestan and Chechnya are believed to have played a key role in the triple suicide bombings and gun attack at Istanbul’s main airport in June.The IS extremist group claimed the Istanbul nightclub attack, the first time it has ever clearly claimed a major attack in the country despite being blamed for several strikes including the airport bombings.last_img read more

first_imgWENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOConnie De La Rosa holds baby Angel in the NICU at University Hospital. She’s the first participant in a new study of Family Nurture Intervention.Each year, 1 in 10 babies born in the U.S. spends time in the NICU, the neonatal intensive care unit. Years later, many of these children have developmental, learning or behavioral problems, including autism.A new study is designed to determine if different kinds of nurturing in the first few months of life could improve outcomes. San Antonio mothers and babies are taking part in the research. Baby Angel came into the world early, 11 weeks early to be exact, weighing less than four pounds.“He was so tiny and had all these wires on him and I was scared to hurt him,” said Angel’s mother Connie De La Rosa.De La Rosa spends as much time as she can with her son in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of San Antonio’s University Hospital.WENDY RIGBY / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOBaby Angel was born 11 weeks early. He’s spending time in University Hospital’s NICU until he’s ready to go home.Umber Darilek , RN, said there’s no playbook for mothers of tiny, sometimes sick babies.  No book to read, no real world advice from your grandmother on how to cope.“We see moms looking terrified,” Darilek commented. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.”That’s why Martha Welch, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York is studying an intervention called Family Nurture. Welch believes early physical trauma and a potential lack of emotional connection between mother and baby may set up these young patients for difficulties later.“They’re isolated,” Welch stated. “They’re not having social involvement. We think they are being adversely conditioned to human contact because so much of the contact is challenging. It’s tubes and IVs and skin pricks. Pre-term infants have a higher rate of risk for developmental problems including autism.”Welch says early in life, when babies cuddle in their mother’s arms, or nurse, or have eye contact, they develop a bond at the visceral level, in the autonomic nervous system that’s responsible for what we call “gut feelings.” That means later in life, you may feel calmer just by being around your mother.To help establish that connection in the NICU, nurture specialists help new moms with skin-to-skin holding, comforting touch, scent exchange, eye contact and vocal soothing.“We did a very successful first trial with amazing outcomes, totally different from the usual outcomes for pre-term infants in terms of cognition, language, risk for autism, behavior,” Welch said.Now, University Hospital is taking a page from Columbia’s playbook, conducting a family nurturing study of its own to try and replicate positive results for NICU babies.“It was like a light bulb. It was like ‘wow,’” said neonatologist Alice Gong, MD, of UT Health San Antonio.Gong said during her three decades of dealing with mother-baby interaction, she has witnessed the temper tantrums and intestinal issues that often plague NICU babies for years.“They’ve been sheltering their baby for so long,” Gong said of the new mothers. “They’re so scared they are going to die that they pretty much don’t mother them the same way they do their other children.”Gong is recruiting 50 moms and babies for her study. De La Rosa is the first.“She told me that I would help my baby connect,” De La Rosa commented. “I hold him skin to skin, talk to my baby, show him emotions. Now mommy instincts are kicking in.”Welch said science backs up her early positive results. By 18 months, one in four NICU babies has behaviors that fall somewhere on the autism spectrum. With Family Nurture Intervention, that number decreased to one in ten. The ultimate goal of these studies is to change the culture in NICUs around the country. Copyright 2017 KSTX-FM. To see more, visit KSTX-FM. Sharelast_img read more

first_imgSpace City FilmsAn astronaut on a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /09:36 X center_img Share Space City FilmsWhen you think about the dangers of a spacewalk, accidentally floating away from your ship or running out of air might come to mind — but not drowning.But that’s what almost happened to an astronaut on a spacewalk in 2013.A new documentary details what went wrong. It’s called EVA 23. EVA stands for extravehicular activity, NASA lingo for a spacewalk.It was July 2013, and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano were doing some pretty routine work outside the International Space Station.But things took a turn when Parmitano experienced something unusual: he felt water on the back of his neck.The incident wasn’t cause for panic. Perhaps the pouch containing his drinking water had leaked as they believed it had on a previous spacewalk.But, as time passed, more water began filling Parmitano’s helmet to the point where his eyes and nose were covered — only his mouth remained unobstructed so he could breathe.Space City FilmsItalian astronaut Luca Parmitano demonstrates how water behaves in zero gravity.Eventually the decision was made to end the EVA and return the station. But as he worked his way back in the darkness of space the water began moving as he moved, creating the fear he wouldn’t get back to the airlock before his helmet was completely filled.Space City FilmsNASA astronaut Chris Cassidy describes the problem that occurred with his colleague’s spacesuit, as documented in the film EVA 23.The story of what went wrong and how Parmitano survived with the help of Cassidy and his ISS crew mates makes for a harrowing reminder of the inherent dangers of space exploration.In the audio above, the film’s directors Phil Sexton and Austin Havican of the Clear Lake-based production company Space City Films tell Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty the story of EVA 23.The documentary is screening now at both the Kennedy Space Center and Space Center Houston.– / 8 Listenlast_img read more

first_imgTele Columbus’s Hanover HQGerman cable operator Tele Columbus has acquired Mönchengladbach fibre access provider Big Medienversorgung, adding about 12,700 connected households in North Rhine-Westphalia, Baden-Württemberg and Berlin to its subscriber base.Tele Columbus said it would offer its own internet and telephony packages over Big Medienversorgung’s network. The latter’s network is expected to grow to 16,400 connected households by the end of the year.The acquisition followed Tele Columbus’ announcement that it had become a stock corporation and that Tele Columbus Holdikng GmbH would be known as Tele Columbus AG going forwards.The change will lead to the creation of a new supervisory board. CEO Ronny Verhelst said the change would give the company more flexibility to achieve growth.Verhelst and chief financial officer Frank Posnanski will form the executive board, with chief commercial officer Stefan Beberweil and chief technology officer Reinhard Sauer making up the senior management team.KBC Bank and Insurance supervisory board member and former Telenet chairman Frank Donck will head the supervisory board, which will also include Pamplona Capital Management partner Carsten Boekhorst and former Belgian prime minister and OECD vice-president Yves Leterme.last_img read more

first_imgRSCC’s Zheleznogorsk satellite control facilityRussian satellite operator RSCC’s new Express-AM8 satellite has become operational at the 14° West orbital slot.Express-AM8 is designed for TV broadcasting services including those distributed nationally across Russia under the country’s Federal TV development programme, as well as data and internet access, corporate and agency-owned communications networks. Express-AM8 also provides communications services for marine and mobile applications.The coverage zones of Express-AM8 in the С- and Ku-bands include Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America.“By commissioning the Express-AM8 satellite, RSCC completes the implementation of the Development of TV and Radio Broadcasting in the Russian Federation in 2009-2018 Federal Target Programme in respect of the orbital constellation deployment,” said RSCC Director-General Yuri Prokhorov.“Thanks to satellite technologies, 98% of Russia’s residents have access to digital broadcasts. Our Company has fulfilled its obligations to build the space segment and terrestrial infrastructure for distributing generic TV/radio digital packages across Russia.”last_img read more