first_imgCoach Cal whispering something into Tyler Ulis' ear.LAWRENCE, KS – JANUARY 30: Head coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats talks with Tyler Ulis #3 during the final minutes of overtime in the game against the Kansas Jayhawks at Allen Fieldhouse on January 30, 2016 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)Kentucky had little difficulty getting past Tennessee Tuesday night. After a close first half, the Wildcats (26-0, 13-0 SEC) blew by the Volunteers (14-11, 6-7 SEC) in the final 20 minutes, winning, 66-48. The blowout victory did not come without some physicality, though. Kentucky freshman guard Tyler Ulis appeared to take a hard shot to the face from a Tennessee guard in the first half. Check out this play: Did anyone see this except @BraxtonDsnyder? pic.twitter.com/BdzD94RdK0— Aaron’s Right Shoe (@AaronsRightShoe) February 18, 2015Was it a punch? A shove? Just incidental contact? It’s tough to tell. Whatever it was, it’s something you usually see a foul called for, and there was no whistle blown last night. [KSR]last_img read more

first_imgDarjeeling: Darjeeling is all set to ring in the festive as well as the tourist season with the Darjeeling Fest 2019.Organised by the Gorkhaland Territorial Administration, the festival will be flagged off on September 20 and will continue till September 27. The festival will be held in different venues in Darjeeling. “The festival is being organised to give a boost to tourism which is the economic mainstay of this region. This year, India has been chosen as the host country by the United Nations to commemorate World Tourism Day. The theme this year is Tourism and Jobs: a better future for all,” said Anit Thapa, Chairman, GTA. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja”The festival is a celebration of the rich and diverse culture of Darjeeling showcased through music, art, dance, sports. The Hill town has always been a joyful place and through this festival we will celebrate peace, harmony and joy,” said Anil Biswakarma, coordinator. The festival will host flower shows, pet shows, fashion shows, football, taekwondo, photography, art, body building, archery, bike rallies and cultural shows. Traditional sports like “Chungi” will also find a place in the festival. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway”The festival will be flagged off with a colorful parade from the Darjeeling Motor Stand on September 20 at 10am. The residents dressed in traditional attire depicting the rich and diverse culture of Darjeeling will take part in the parade. The festival will come to an end on September 27 on World Tourism Day,” said organizer Priya Pundit. An Inter College Fest “Confluence” in also on the cards. “We have been organising Confluence successfully since 2007. It is to promote creativity and an excellent platform for exchange of ideas among students,” said organiser Rajeev Thatal. Confluence will be held on September 27 and 28 at the Jorebunglow Degree College. Thirteen colleges from Darjeeling, Kalimpong and Sikkim will take part in the festival. The festival will include music, cultural shows, quiz, extempore speech, art, photography, documentary, short film shows and career guidance.last_img read more

first_imgToday, co-founders Jennifer Garner, John Foraker, Cassandra Curtis and Ari Raz announce the expansion of Once Upon a Farm, an organic family food company that currently offers a line of cold-pressed organic baby foods and applesauces.John Foraker, Jennifer Garner, Cassandra Curtis and Ari RazThe company has plans to grow into new categories with the goal of providing as many children as possible with the best-tasting, most nutritious and highest quality foods, using sustainable methods.“As a mom of three and Save the Children artist ambassador, I am passionate about childhood nutrition and making sure we are leaving a healthier and happier planet for the next generation,” said Jennifer Garner, co-founder and award-winning actress. “Once Upon a Farm helps parents keep their promise to deliver the best nourishment for their children’s bodies and souls.”Garner, who will serve as Once Upon a Farm’s Chief Brand Officer, joins John Foraker, organic industry pioneer and former longtime President and CEO of Annie’s, to lead the company’s strategy and vision.“I’m thrilled to be able to return to my entrepreneurial roots with co-founders Jennifer, Cassandra and Ari to grow Once Upon a Farm into an industry leader,” said Foraker, CEO. “We’ll not only provide high quality foods that kids love but, perhaps even more importantly, we are committed to driving positive social change and food justice for the benefit of parents, kids and families.”Once Upon a Farm was started by entrepreneurs Cassandra Curtis and Ari Raz, who created the first cold-pressed, organic pouched baby food in 2015. The company currently offers a portfolio of twelve organic, cold-pressed, ready-to-eat baby food pouches, as well as three applesauce varieties. Unlike shelf stable alternatives, Once Upon a Farm pouches are cold-pressed using high-pressure processing (HPP) to maintain a higher nutritional content and fresher, less sugary flavors.The current portfolio is just the beginning of a much bigger vision that responds to the growing nutritional needs of children and families. Products are available online through the company’s website and national grocers, including select Wegmans, Kroger and Whole Foods Market stores. Once Upon a Farm is actively driving retail expansion and looking toward nationwide availability in 2018.Early Once Upon a Farm investors include top tier Venture Capital firms, Cambridge Companies SPG, S2G Ventures, Beechwood Capital and Harbinger Ventures Group. For more information, visit www.onceuponafarmorganics.com.last_img read more

first_imgItalian broadcaster Mediaset has moved to distance itself from an emerging scandal surrounding Emilio Fede, the former head of the broadcaster’s news service TG4.According to La Stampa newspaper, Fede is being investigated for allegedly being in possession of compromising photos – which may have been a photomontage – of Mediaset’s head of information, Mauro Crippa, in the company of transsexuals, that he may have used to attempt to blackmail his former employers.The discovery of the photos emerged when police searched the home of Fede’s personal trainer, a former convict called Gaetano Ferri. That search was carried out in relation to audio files Ferri allegedly possessed containing material about disgraced former prime minister and Mediaset chairman Silvio Berlusconi, former Italian senator, Berlusconi adviser and convicted Mafia associate Marcello Dell’Utri and Karima El Mahrough, known as ‘Ruby the Heartbreaker’.Prosecutors have now reportedly instructed the police to acquire copies of documents related to Fede’s dismissal by Mediaset as part of their investigation.Mediaset said that Fede’s dismissal in 2010 and the subsequent agreement of a severance payment was determined in line with the company’s practice and in accordance with Italy’s labour laws. Acknowledging that Fede is being investigated for blackmail, it said that this had clearly not prevented his dismissal. The company said it would look to take further action, possibly including civil action against the perpetrators of the offence, once it had access to the investigation’s documents.last_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 20 2019A new tool to help physiotherapy students master complex fine motor skills needed to assess and treat patients suffering physical conditions, such as back pain and spinal cord injuries, is being used at the University of Melbourne.Developed by researchers in the University’s School of Computing and Information Systems and the Department of Physiotherapy, the device – SpinalLog – looks and feels like a human spine.Using smart foam sensors, SpinalLog measures the pressure being applied to the spine by the student’s hand or fingers during a simulated assessment.Related StoriesWoman who does not feel painSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyCompounded pain relief creams not effective finds studyThis information is then displayed on a 3D spinal model depicted on-screen, providing real-time visual feedback on the pressure pattern and technique used to mobilize the spine.University of Melbourne Human-Computer Interaction lecturer Eduardo Velloso, who helped design the device, said SpinalLog offers students a safe way of practicing their skills.”Traditionally, to teach these skills, the instructor demonstrates a force pattern on a volunteer and asks students to practice on each other by replicating the moment,” Dr Velloso said.”However, because these movements are very subtle, it is difficult for students to obverse them fully. Similarly, when students perform the movements themselves, it is difficult for instructors to provide feedback based on what they can see.”Preliminary tests show the visual feedback has a huge impact on students’ ability to replicate the force pattern demonstrated by the instructor.University of Melbourne physiotherapy senior lecturer David Kelly said SpinalLog represents the real-life conditions of a human spine suffering different levels of stiffness, bringing the clinic, to the classroom.”Students get clear and immediate feedback on an authentic feeling spine,” Dr Kelly said.”This means they get a better experience; they learn faster and are able to mimic what the instructor is teaching them, making them better prepared for the sorts of techniques that they’ll need as practitioners.”​ Source:https://www.unimelb.edu.au/last_img read more

© 2018 AFP Citation: On chaotic SE Asian roads, local hero Grab zips past Uber (2018, March 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-chaotic-se-asian-roads-local.html Uber selling Southeast Asia operations to Grab: report Spanning 10 countries, from wealthy, ultra-organised Singapore to places like Indonesia and the Philippines that are home to traffic-choked cities, coming up with a ride-hailing service for the whole of Southeast Asia was never going to be easy.But Grab’s Malaysian chief executive, Anthony Tan, combined his local knowledge with sharp business sense from his time at Harvard Business School to come up with a service well adapted to the region and quickly raced past Uber.After a years-long fight that cost both companies huge sums as they aggressively slashed fares and rolled out special offers, the California-based company threw in the towel Monday and sold its ride-sharing and food delivery services to Grab for an undisclosed sum.”Grab is more familiar with its home territory, Southeast Asia,” said Song Seng Wun, a regional economist with CIMB Private Bank.”They saw the Uber model and tweaked it to adapt to local conditions, giving Southeast Asians what they want.”In 2015 they added motorbike taxis to their ride-hailing app in Indonesia, where many commuters get around on two wheels due to heavy traffic, helping them to rival local titan Go-Jek, which had pioneered the service.Uber followed slowly up the rear, only adding motorbike taxis to their service in the Indonesian capital a year later, by which time the market was saturated.Uber’s disadvantage was that they lacked local knowledge and relied heavily on the model which had allowed them to lead in developed markets, according to Song.Dramatic expansionWith smartphone ownership exploding across a region that was rapidly growing more affluent, Grab moved fast and expanded aggressively to ensure they were Southeast Asia’s best-known ride-hailing app—they now operate in 195 cities across eight Southeast Asian countries. As they became more successful, they attracted more funding, including $2.5 billion last year from investors including Chinese ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing and Japan’s SoftBank.By contrast, when they sold off their operations, Uber was operating in just 64 cities in eight Southeast Asian countries.Grab has expanded dramatically from its early days. In 2012 Tan quit his job at the family business—Tan Chong Motor, which distributes Nissan cars in Malaysia and Singapore—and founded taxi-booking app MyTeksi with a friend from Harvard. The name was later changed to GrabTaxi and then just Grab. It now has a huge range of services, from offering private cars and motorbike taxis to renting out coaches, push bikes and electric scooters, to a payment system called GrabPay.Tan himself sounds amazed that his company has done so well. “We are humbled that a company born in Southeast Asia has built one of the largest platforms that millions of consumers use daily,” he said, in a statement announcing Monday’s deal.His next big challenge is Indonesia, Southeast Asia’s biggest market—where he will be taking on former Harvard classmate Nadiem Makarim, the CEO of ride-hailing market leader Go-Jek. Uber may be the world’s biggest ride-hailing company but it was left in the dust in Southeast Asia by homegrown upstart Grab, which knew better how to navigate the chaotic highways and byways of an eclectic region. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Grab’s Malaysian chief executive, Anthony Tan, used his local knowledge to come up with a service well adapted to the Southeast Asia region and quickly raced past Uber read more

first_img Provided by University at Buffalo A new study suggests the power industry is underestimating how climate change could affect the long-term demand for electricity in the United States. Journal information: Risk Analysis Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: Sayanti Mukherjee et al, A Data-Driven Approach to Assessing Supply Inadequacy Risks Due to Climate-Induced Shifts in Electricity Demand, Risk Analysis (2018). DOI: 10.1111/risa.13192 Citation: How will climate change stress the power grid? Hint: Look at dew point temperatures (2018, September 24) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-climate-stress-power-grid-hint.html The research, published today in the journal Risk Analysis, was led by the University at Buffalo and Purdue University.It describes the limitations of prediction models used by electricity providers and regulators for medium- and long-term energy forecasting. And it outlines a new model that includes key climate predictors—mean dew point temperature and extreme maximum temperature—that researchers say present a more accurate view of how climate change will alter future electricity demands.”Existing energy demand models haven’t kept pace with our increasing knowledge of how the climate is changing,” says the study’s lead author Sayanti Mukherjee, Ph.D., assistant professor of industrial and systems engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “This is troublesome because it could lead to supply inadequacy risks that cause more power outages, which can affect everything from national security and the digital economy to public health and the environment.””The availability of public data in the energy sector, combined with advances in algorithmic modeling, has enabled us to go beyond existing approaches that often exhibit poor predictive performance. As a result, we’re able to better characterize the nexus between energy demand and climate change, and assess future supply inadequacy risks,” says co-author Roshanak Nateghi, Ph.D., assistant professor of industrial engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue.The limitations of existing models The overwhelming majority of climate scientists predict global temperatures will rise throughout 21st century. This is expected to increase the demand for electricity as more people turn to air conditioners to keep cool.One of the most common energy modeling platforms used to predict future electricity demand—MARKAL, named after MARKet and ALlocation—does not consider climate variability.Another common energy-economic model, the National Energy Modeling System, or NEMS, does consider the climate. However, it’s limited to heating and cooling degree days. A heating degree day is defined as a day when the average temperature is above 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celsius). A cooling degree day is when the average temperature is below 65 degrees. Study’s projections show climate change to increase commercial Indiana energy consumption, reduce residential use While there are different ways to measure heating and cooling degree days, they are most often calculated by adding the day’s high temperature to the day’s low temperature, and then dividing the sum by two. For example, a high of 76 degrees and a low of 60 degrees results in an average temperature of 68 degrees.The trouble with this approach, Mukherjee says, is that it doesn’t consider time. For example, it could be 76 degrees for 23 hours and 60 degrees for one hour—yet the average temperature that day would still be recorded as 68 degrees.”Moreover, choice of the accurate balance point temperature is highly contentious, and there is no consensus from the research community of how to best select it,” says Mukherjee.Dew point temperature is the keyTo address these limitations, she and Nateghi studied more than a dozen weather measurements. They found that the mean dew point temperature—the temperature at which air is saturated with water vapor—is the best predictor of increased energy demand. The next best predictor is the extreme maximum temperature for a month, they say.The researchers combined these climate predictors with three other categories—the sector (residential, commercial and industrial) consuming the energy, weather data and socioeconomic data—to create their model.They applied the model to the state of Ohio and found that the residential sector is most sensitive to climate variabilities. With a moderate rise in dew point temperature, electricity demand could increase up to 20 percent. The prediction jumps to 40 percent with a severe rise.By comparison, the Public Utility Commission of Ohio (PUCO), which does not consider climate change in its models, predicts residential demand increases of less than 4 percent up to 2033.It’s similar in the commercial sector, where the researchers say demand could increase to 14 percent. Again, PUCO’s projections are lower, 3.2 percent. The industrial sector is less sensitive to temperature variability, however, researchers say the demand could still exceed projections.During the winter months, variations between the models is less significant. That is due, in part, to the relatively low percentage (22.6 percent) of Ohio residents who heat their homes via electricity.While the study is limited to Ohio, researchers say the model can be applied to other states. To communicate results, the researchers used heat maps, which provide an immediate visual summary of the data represented by colors. The idea, they say, is to better inform decision makers with accurate and easy to understand information. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img MIT unveils new $1 bn college for artificial intelligence Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. An American billionaire has given Oxford University 150 million pounds ($188.6 million) for a new institute that will study the ethical implications of artificial intelligence and its vast potential to change society as we know it. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.center_img Citation: US CEO hands Oxford University $189 million for AI studies (2019, June 19) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-ceo-oxford-university-million-ai.html In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019 file photo, Stephen Schwarzman CEO of Blackstone attends the session ‘Shaping a New Market Architecture’ at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. An American billionaire has given Oxford University 150 million pounds ($188.6 million) for a new institute that will study the ethical implications of artificial intelligence and computing technologies. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File) The donation from Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of the private equity firm Blackstone, will also fund a center to house all of the university’s humanities subjects in a single space to encourage collaborative study. The idea is to bring together those working on projects that make life worth living with those trying to make sure that the technology of the future works for the interest of society.”AI can be an enormous force for good,” Schwarzman told The Associated Press. “But on the downside it can lead to high unemployment. It could destabilize society if it happens too fast.”Schwarzman compared the rise of AI to the rise of the internet, which was launched by computer scientists who thought it was fun and interesting. But the scientists didn’t adequately consider the downsides of the internet, such as the inability to control cyberbullying or fake news—and the implications of that on democracy.”No one wants to go through that again,” he said of the struggles that government has had in trying to keep the negatives in check. He said ethics and AI are “one of the major issues of our age,” and that governments globally are currently unprepared to deal with the implications. The vision is for the new center at Oxford to address that gap.”The reason do it is to protect society,” he said.Schwarzman co-founded Blackstone, which has some $512 billion assets under management.In recent years, he has made other sizeable donations to educational institutions. Last October, he gave $350 million to establish the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing, which will also address the challenges of AI.”I’m focused on this like a laser,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgRELATED safety of citizens President Ram Nath Kovind addresses a joint session of Parliament, in New Delhi.   –  PTI SHARE SHARE SHARE EMAIL Published on immigrants The central government has decided to implement the National Register of Citizens (NRC), currently being updated in Assam, on priority basis in areas affected by infiltration, President Ram Nath Kovind said on Thursday.In his address to the joint sitting of both Houses of Parliament, Kovind also said efforts will be made to amend the Citizenship Act while protecting linguistic, cultural and social identities. “My government has decided to implement the process of National Register of Citizens on priority basis in areas affected by infiltration,” he said in his customary address after the formation of the 17th Lok Sabha.The President, however, did not specify in which areas the NRC will be implemented. Apart from Assam, West Bengal, Tripura and some other parts of the Northeast are reportedly affected by the problem of illegal immigration. Kovind said security along the border will be further strengthened to prevent infiltration.The President said while on the one hand, the government is working to identify infiltrators, on the other, it is also fully committed to protecting those who are victims of persecution due to their faith in neighbouring countries. “In this regard, efforts will be made to amend the Citizenship Act while protecting the linguistic, cultural and social identities,” he said.The Supreme Court-monitored NRC exercise, aimed at identifying illegal immigrants in the state that borders Bangladesh, was carried out only in Assam, which faced an influx of people from Bangladesh since the early 20th century.When the draft NRC was published on July 30, 2018, there was a huge controversy over the exclusion of 40.7 lakh people from it. The draft NRC included the names of 2.9 crore people out of the total 3.29 crore applications. The final list of the NRC will be published on July 31, 2019.When the NRC was first prepared in Assam way back in 1951, the state had 80 lakh citizens. According to the 2011 census, Assam’s total population is over 3.11 crore. The process of identification of illegal immigrants in the state has been widely debated and is a contentious issue in state politics.There were huge protests in the Northeast, particularly in Assam, early this year over the move to amend the Citizenship Act as it intends to give citizenship to Hindu, Sikh, Jain, Buddhist and Christian illegal immigrants from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan.The main objection of the people of the Northeast was to the proposed amendment to the Citizenship Act will negate a provision of the 1985 Assam Accord, which provides for declaration anyone, irrespective of religion, who had entered India after 1971 as foreigner. The BJP has maintained that the Citizenship Amendment Bill is aimed to give Indian nationality to those people who have been facing persecution in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan for their religion.center_img June 20, 2019 President Kovind stresses on water conservation and management Lok Sabha COMMENTS COMMENT Social evils Triple Talaq and Nikah-Halala must be eradicated: President Kovind last_img read more

first_imgMOGADISHU (Reuters) – A car bomb went off on Friday at a hotel in Somalia’s port city of Kismayu where local elders and lawmakers had been discussing an upcoming regional election and was followed by gunfire, police said, adding that the death toll could be high.A journalists’ group said it had confirmed two reporters among the dead.The militant Islamist group al Shabaab, which is trying to topple Somalia’s central government, claimed responsibility for the attack. It said its fighters had battled their way into the hotel after a suicide car bomb attack.One police officer said the gunfire had died down about an hour and a half after the explosion. Residents said the attackers were still in the hotel at 2000 GMT. Related News Related News World 23 Jun 2019 Three al Shabaab fighters killed in Kenya after attack on police “… but we believe the militants are still in the building. We have not confirmed the death toll, but there were many people inside, and there may be a high death toll,” police captain Abdullahi Isak told Reuters by phone.Major Mohamed Abdi, another police officer, told Reuters earlier that local elders and lawmakers were meeting at the Hotel Asasey when the attack happened.Abdiasis Abu Musab, al Shabaab’s military operation spokesman, said the militant group had been behind the attack.”First we targeted (the hotel) with a suicide car bomb and then armed mujahideen (guerrilla fighters) stormed the hotel. We are still fighting inside the hotel,” he said.”There are many dead bodies inside the hotel, including a dead white man. We control the hotel now.”Hussein Nur, a shopkeeper in Kismayu, told Reuters: “There were many people including officials and elders, mostly from one clan, who were discussing the coming Kismayu election.” Nur was referring to elections in the city due sometime in August.Somali Journalists Syndicate said in a statement that two journalists based in Kismayu had been confirmed dead in the attack.”Mohamed Omar Sahal, SBC TV correspondent based in Kismayu and Hodan Naleyeh, female TV journalist and founder of Integration TV (are) both among (those) killed,” Abdalle Ahmed Mumin, the syndicate’s secretary general, said.It said Naleyeh had recently returned from Canada.”The deaths of Hodan, 43 and Sahal, 35, become the first journalists killed in the country this year,” the statement said.State-run Somali National News Agency said in a statement Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khaire had condemned the attack.Al Shabaab was ejected from Mogadishu in 2011 and has since been driven from most of its other strongholds.It was driven out of Kismayu in 2012. The city’s port had been a major source of revenue for the group from taxes, charcoal exports and levies on arms and other illegal imports.Kismayu is the commercial capital of Jubbaland, a region of southern Somalia still partly controlled by al Shabaab.It remains a major security threat, with fighters frequently carrying out bombings in Somalia and neighbouring Kenya, whose troops form part of the African Union-mandated peacekeeping force that helps defend the Somali government. (Reporting by Abdi Sheikh; Writing by George Obulutsa; Editing by Gareth Jones and David Gregorio)center_img {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} World 29 Apr 2019 Air strike kills four people in Somalia -relatives World 10 May 2019 U.S. air strike kills 13 Islamic State fighters in Somalia – U.S. militarylast_img read more