first_imgMay 12, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Pregnant women who have confirmed, probable, or suspected novel influenza H1N1 infections should receive antiviral treatment for 5 days, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today in a detailed report on three pregnant women who had the disease, one of whom died.In its surveillance of the novel influenza outbreak, the CDC has been gathering information on infections in pregnant women. As of May 10, 20 cases have been reported, including 15 confirmed and 5 probable cases. The CDC published its findings on the three cases in a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Dispatch.Anne Schuchat, MD, interim deputy director CDC’s science and public health program, said at a media briefing today that the CDC is singling out the cases to remind healthcare providers and the public that pregnant women are at higher risk for flu complications such as pneumonia and dehydration and that the agency is seeing some severe complications in pregnant women who have novel H1N1 infections.”We want to get the word out about prompt antiviral treatment,” she said.The first of three case reports in today’s MMWR Dispatch appears to describe the Texas woman who was recorded as the nation’s second novel H1N1 flu death. The 33-year-old woman was 35 weeks pregnant and had a 1-day history of myalgia, dry cough, and low-grade fever when she was seen on Apr 15 by her obstetrician. She had a history of psoriasis and mild asthma, but was not taking medication for the conditions.Four days later she went to the emergency department with worsening shortness of breath, fever, and cough. During the visit the woman had severe respiratory distress. Chest radiographs showed bilateral nodular infiltrates, and the woman was intubated and placed on mechanical ventilation. Her doctors performed a cesarean delivery, and the healthy baby girl was later discharged home.On Apr 21 the woman experienced acute respiratory distress syndrome. One week later, she began receiving oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and broad-spectrum antibiotics, but she died on May 4.During the woman’s hospitalization San Antonio health officials detected an untypable influenza A strain in the woman’s nasopharyngeal specimen and sent it to the CDC, which on Apr 30 confirmed the novel H1N1 virus.In the second case report, a previously health 35-year-old woman who was 32 weeks pregnant sought treatment at the emergency department on Apr 20 with a 1-day history of shortness of breath, fever, cough, diarrhea, headache, myalgia, sore throat, and inspiratory chest pain. Chest radiographs were normal and the rapid influenza test was negative. She received parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, acetaminophen, and an albuterol inhaler, and was sent home.The next day her obstetrician obtained a nasopharyngeal sample and sent it for testing. She recovered fully and her pregnancy is progressing normally following her treatment with antibiotics, antinausea medication, and an inhaled corticosteroid. Influenza testing revealed an untypable influenza A strain, which was forwarded to the CDC and confirmed as novel H1N1.She had visited Mexico 3 days before she was seen in the emergency department, and several of her family members on both sides of the border had recently been sick with flu-like illnesses.The third patient, a 29-year-old woman who was 23 weeks pregnant, visited her family doctor for a 1-day history of cough, sore throat, chills, and subjective fever. She had a history of asthma but was not on medication. Her 7-year-old son was also sick and was also seen during the appointment. Another son, age 10, had been sick with similar symptoms the previous week. The family had not traveled to Mexico recently.The woman’s doctor was 13 weeks pregnant and began oseltamivir prophylaxis and did not get sick.The woman’s rapid influenza test was positive. Her doctor prescribed oseltamivir, her symptoms resolved, and the pregnancy is proceeding normally. The Washington State Public Health Laboratory identified the woman’s virus sample as untypable influenza A, and the CDC later confirmed it as novel H1N1.CDC experts note in the report that research has shown a higher risk for complications in pregnant women during seasonal flu outbreaks and previous pandemics. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and immune system changes during pregnancy are thought to contribute to the higher risk, and health officials have recommended that pregnant women receive annual flu vaccines.Though little information is available on antiviral use during pregnancy, the CDC says the benefits of treatment for the novel virus outweigh the potential risk to the fetus.Alongside its recommendation for 5-day antiviral treatment for pregnant women, the CDC recommends that pregnant women who are in close contact with a confirmed, probable, or suspected case-patient receive a 10-day prophylactic course of antivirals.Though both of the neuraminidase inhibitors can be used to treat or prevent the new virus, the CDC said oseltamivir is the preferred treatment, because its systemic absorption may provide better protection against mother-to-child transmission.”Beginning treatment as early as possible is critical,” the CDC states, adding that treating fevers with acetaminophen is important for preventing maternal hyperthermia, which can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes.CDC. Novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infections in three pregnant women, United States, April-May 2009. MMWR Dispatch 2009 May 12;58 [Full text]last_img read more

first_imgAt the annual conference organized by the tour operator TUI, Valamar Riviera was crowned with another award.Naime, već nakon prve sezone poslovanja TUI Family Life Bellevue Resort 4* osvojio je nagradu kao najbolje ukupno ocijenjeni novi hotel u konceptu FAMILY LIFE i za najbolji WI-FI među svim TUI FAMILY LIFE hotelima u svijetu, i to prema ocjenama iz anketa gostiju koje ovaj turoperater redovito provodi. Uz to, ‘Green & Grill’ a la carte restoran ovog Resorta nagrađen je kao ‘Best Practice’, odnosno kao najbolji primjer implementacije visokih TUI-jevih standarda, što su prepoznali i ovogodišnji gosti te mu također dodjelili visoku ocjenu u anketama.Family Life Bellevue Resort 4* otvoren je u lipnju ove godine te uz Valamar Girandella Resort  4*/5* predstavlja najveću ovogodišnju investiciju u hrvatskom turizmu. Priprema i realizacija projekta trajala je samo godinu i pol dana, a u razvoju projekta Valamar Riviera je ostvarila dva strateška partnerstva s najvećim europskim turoperatorima, TUI i Rewe grupom. U Family Life Bellevue Resortu u Rapcu se, temeljem ugovora s TUI-jem, u sljedeće tri godine očekuje 76.000 novih aviogostiju s britanskog i skandinavskog tržišta.The TUI Group is the largest travel company in the world, comprising a chain of strong tour operators, 1.500 agencies, six airlines with more than 150 aircraft, 300 hotels with more than 214.000 beds and 14 cruisers. More than 20 million guests use their services annually.last_img read more

first_imgThe Garden Resort in Tisno has been voted among the 10 best European festival locations by the influential The Guardian, gaining the support of major media outlets such as The Telegraph, The Independent, DJ Mag, with the support of local, national and regional media. Festival visitors come from all over the world, such as Australia, New Zealand, Russia, Iceland, and from all over Europe, to witness the unique blend of holiday with a musical background.The festival that was the first to place Croatia among the festival destinations and started an avalanche of young tourists from Great Britain, thus encouraging the arrival of Ryanair in Zadar. However, all this is not enough and relevant, and after six years The Garden Resort is leaving Tisno, and maybe even Croatia, announced Nick Colgan, the organizer of The Garden Festival.Reason? The classic Croatian problem – politics and petty interest of individuals.Because of politics, not markets. If we look from the market side, the Garden Festival has revived Tisno, each year attracting 20 foreign guests from more than 000 countries (a total of over 40 guests since Garden in Tisno) who spend about 120.000 euros per day and stay a minimum of 100 days, and this year’s budget of external promoters alone is approximately 7 million euros for the program part alone. After the arrival of the Garden in Tisno, the number of tourists increased by over 1,5%, and if we only roughly calculate 30 tourists x 120.000 euros x 100 days, we come to the exact number and tourist consumption generated directly in Tisno. And when we add the funds invested in the promotion of the destination and the fact that tomorrow, in a few years, when these same guests become parents, they will return to Tisno as another type of guest, it is quite clear how harmful the decision to leave the Garden Festival is Tisno and the whole region, including Croatia.Insane and out of every mind. But… always that but in Lijepa naša.Namely, this Monday, May 28, the Municipal Council of Tisno voted to re-issue the work permit to the Vortex beach bar, which was revoked last year due to illegal work right next to the location of the Garden Festival. What is controversial throughout the story is that the license allows Vortex to play extremely loud music between 07:00 and 12:00 in the morning from June 15 to September 1, thus preventing the festival guests from taking a morning break. “Based on the annual complaints of our guests and foreign partners, we have continuously warned about this problem. This decision of the Municipal Council of Tisno prevented us from doing business responsibly and fulfilling the contractual obligations we have assumed towards our guests. Following the above, The Garden team has been leaving Tisno since 2019, and with the support of international event organizers, we have started talks on a new location for 2019. ” Nick Colgan explained his decision.Interestingly, if it weren’t for the Garden Festival, there wouldn’t be a Vortex beach bar, but that doesn’t mean anything when our politics and petty private interests are involved in the game.Nick Colgan, host of The Garden Resort: It is amazing that it is the representatives of our friends from Tisno who make this decision”Although we are very happy in Tisno and still have a contract with Hostina, the owners of the location, this will be our last year as we will host international events in Tisno. We will be actively looking for a new location for the 2019 season and beyond and we already have several new locations in mind. The decision of the Municipal Council in Tisno, which allows Vortex to work right next to us and during our events from 07:00 to 12:00 with loud music, prevents The Garden from providing a comfortable environment in which our guests can sleep so that they will not return in the future. We offer a small percentage of beds for festival guests, and most of them stay in Tisno, Jezera, Betina and Murter. We are shocked by the Council’s decision and feel they are looking at things short-sightedly. It seems incredible to me that small particular interests stop a project that brings over 20 foreign guests to Tisno over eight weeks. The decision to leave Tisno was not an easy one, but staying in such an environment would permanently jeopardize the project in which we, together with our foreign partners, have invested a great deal of energy and financial resources. The inappropriately loud music of the local bar does not allow people to relax in the morning and guests no longer want to stay on site.This year we expect up to 20 visitors from more than 000 countries around the world who spend around € 40 per day and stay for a minimum of 100 days, and this year’s external promoters budget is around € 7 million for the program part alone. This is the best year so far, four of the six events are sold out in advance for this season, and we also have two new events planned for next year, as well as one smaller event in the preseason. This year we have additionally invested in mobile homes inside the camp site, but now these guests will be completely disrupted by the Vortex. In a conversation with other local government leaders, we will try to find a new destination for The Garden in Croatia. We feel responsible and we feel sorry for the many locals who have contacted us and in recent years invested in their accommodation facilities based on our guests. We believe that the Municipal Council has made a decision that is not well thought out and is harmful in the long run for the local population with whom we work extremely well. It is unbelievable that the representatives of our friends from Tisno make such a decision. “The noise that is created at their unofficial after parties leads to numerous complaints, inability to sleep which means that our visitors cannot rest, which then affects their commitment to our festival. It often ends up with hordes of visitors trying to sleep through the day which is neither ideal nor good looking. It is far from what we expect from our festival and for our community it is a serious problem. We had about 100-150 people who told us that because of that they would not return to the festival, and those are the only ones we know about. This has ruined our daily program, Vortex is obviously taking advantage of the hard work and investment of us, you and other festivals at The Garden Resort in Tisno. We can’t sell any camp accommodation options because people will only ask for a refund due to the noise level produced by Vortex outside normal hours, and this in turn has a real commercial impact on our ability for the festival to grow. Simply, if this presents us with further problems in 2018, we will have no choice but to look for alternative locations in 2019, which is far from our business strategy and desires because we love working with The Garden and trust them. And The Garden is one of the most beautiful locations in the world. We do not want to be evicted by an unofficial third party. That would be a terrible pity.”Nick Colgan said in a statement.In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”How to explain such a Decision to someone normal, and especially to foreigners and foreign investors, as well as the whole way of doing business in Croatia, and especially in local areas where various local “sheriffs” make such decisions. Croatia chronically lacks a market economy, not a contract economy, which is the case here.Unfortunately, to date, there has been no reaction from the Ministry of Tourism and the CNTB, but it is easiest to say that this is not their problem and distance yourself from everything. What image do we send outwards, both to guests and to investors? What picture am I sending about ourselves?This is a classic example of Croatian reality and the real situation on the ground. That is why we are in this situation in the country and that is why young people go to look for their future in other countries. So much for the strategic development of our tourist destinations and our tourism.One is politics and the other is market and strategic development that should be in everyone’s interest. Because of such things, tourist destinations are stagnating or developing too slowly, and the biggest losers are all. From hotels, landlords, restaurants, museums, etc.… all in a tourist destination. That is why it is necessary for everyone in the destination to unite and look for market changes and development, not political ones. Politics has nothing to do with it, at least it shouldn’t have, this is a matter of development and markets.Too much politics, and too little profession, strategic and market development.This has nothing to do with the market, but solely a political decision. Citizens of Tisno, if you are wondering why you are stagnant and there is no development, why you cannot live from tourism all year round, why your children are leaving, ask the people responsible for the development of the Municipality and tourist destinations in Tisno Municipal Council.And therein lies our whole problem in tourism. Smart enough.last_img read more

first_img Published on October 4, 2011 at 12:00 pm Comments At home in the dead of the night, the craving for that next Winston cigarette must have been insatiable. How bitter that next cup of half-black coffee must have tasted.Jake Crouthamel piped down on 30 cigarettes and drank 10 cups of half-black coffee a day during his 27 years as director of athletics for Syracuse University. But in June 2003, this Winston, the first after Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford told Crouthamel the ACC had revoked Syracuse’s invitation to the ACC — one the Orange had accepted, Crouthamel said — must have provided the most requisite release of all.‘As far as I was concerned, a formal invitation is a formal invitation,’ Crouthamel said. ‘I had assumed — and this was not a one-person decision, this was a conference decision — that it had been through and through and verified. The decision was made to invite Syracuse. The call was made extending the invitation, and Syracuse agreed.’In 2003, eight years before Syracuse accepted an invitation three weeks ago on Sept. 18 to join the ACC along with Pittsburgh, SU accepted an invitation to join the very same league. Was it well known? No. But had Crouthamel and Swofford, together, come to some kind of terms on the direction of the ACC and Syracuse?Yes.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘In my mind the process has been thoroughly completed and it’s over,’ Crouthamel said. ‘So all of this stuff that was going on behind the scenes was unbeknown to me at the time.’‘A friend was calling a friend and telling me that the original phone call that I had received before was no longer valid,’ Crouthamel added. ‘And I thought it was a betrayal.’But why was it a betrayal? On June 4, 2003, three ACC officials visited the SU campus and the ACC was set on inviting Syracuse, along with the league’s top target, Miami, and Boston College. Yet two weeks later, Swofford made that phone call to his friend, rescinding the original offer and effectively ending their relationship. The two haven’t spoken since.Crouthamel and then-SU Chancellor Kenneth ‘Buzz’ Shaw weren’t aware of exactly what and who were truly affecting Syracuse’s ACC candidacy and why Swofford rescinded the offer. That Boston College and Virginia Tech would ultimately enter the league over the Orange lay more in unknown politics hundreds of miles away.Simply, why didn’t Syracuse end up in the ACC when it wanted to, eight years prior to 2011? When it had not only one, but arguably two chances?***Bill Leighty will be happy to tell you. He was, after all, the man who screwed a Virginia Tech-ACC license plate onto the governor of Virginia’s car mere days after Virginia Tech and Miami joined the ACC in late June 2003 — days after Swofford called Crouthamel — with a smile on his face.Leighty, the former chief of staff to Gov. Mark Warner of Virginia, knows the reason why Syracuse’s invitation was revoked: Warner. The governor spearheaded a resilient lobbying and politicking plan in June of 2003 with the goal of the ACC and its presidents extending membership to Virginia Tech, Leighty said.‘I think a lot of people worked on it,’ Leighty said. ‘But the bottom line is it would not have happened without Mark Warner’s involvement. Period.’Warner’s expansive efforts targeted not only Virginia administrators and its Board of Visitors, but also Division-I presidents from the ACC and across the country.What Leighty meant was that the ACC ultimately inviting Virginia Tech over Syracuse in 2003 was contingent upon Warner’s efforts. His eleventh-hour lobbying ultimately persuaded seven of nine ACC presidents to vote for Virginia Tech. And it helped that then-University of Virginia President John Casteen was on Warner’s side from the beginning.‘What I can tell you is that John Casteen was supportive all along,’ Leighty said. ‘They did it very quietly, but I think that John Casteen recognized that it was a boost for the rivalry between Virginia and Virginia Tech, and I would actually say that Casteen and Warner were co-conspirators in this thing.’Crouthamel said he later found out Casteen was going as far as threatening to pull Virginia out of the conference if membership wasn’t extended to Virginia Tech — whether or not that was just a scare tactic was never tested.None of it was simple. And none of it was apparent to Syracuse’s administrators at the time. Crouthamel found out about Warner’s politicking efforts later, when an ACC athletic director, who he declined to name, informed him of the events.‘Yes, it was the governor of Virginia exerting a certain influence on the ACC on behalf of Virginia Tech, saying again they would pull Virginia out of the ACC if Virginia Tech wasn’t invited,’ Crouthamel said.***Richard Blumenthal effectively gave Warner the time he needed. The Connecticut attorney general filed a lawsuit in a Connecticut court on June 6, 2003, just two days after ACC officials left the Syracuse campus with what seemed like concrete mutual interest.In the suit, Virginia Tech and four other Big East institutions accused the ACC of conspiring to destroy the Big East, seeking millions of dollars in monetary compensation. Virginia Tech vowed to preserve the Big East in the suit, but the school continued working privately toward ACC inclusion with the extra time.All the while, Warner had the administrative backing of the University of Virginia’s Board of Visitors, and with that, Casteen had all the power he needed to put forth his second expansion vote only for Virginia Tech.According to ACC bylaws, seven of nine schools needed to vote yes to admit another school. Duke and North Carolina were traditionally opposed to any expansion. Virginia and Casteen, in essence, were that seventh swing vote. But one thing is clear: The suit had some effect.It gave Warner time.‘I do remember that we thought we were out (of luck) a number of times,’ Leighty said. ‘But there was additional time, and I guess the lawsuit was why that happened.’Eight times, Leighty recalls, he and Warner thought it was over. Eight times, the prospects of Syracuse joining the ACC would have been better had they given up.But finally on June 24, when the presidents voted on each expansion plan separately, Virginia Tech and Miami were approved as the 10th and 11th teams. Warner and Casteen had won. Crouthamel and Shaw had lost.***Syracuse history professor David Bennett thought it was obvious SU could still join the ACC even after June 24. This was an obvious second chance as, to Bennett, it was clear the ACC would go to 12 teams to have a lucrative conference championship game.Bennett, the former chairman of the Athletic Policy Board and the NCAA Faculty Representative from 1975-95, went to Shaw.‘The question I had for (Shaw), it wasn’t a question, it was a strong feeling, and it was that this could not stand,’ Bennett said. ‘ … They were clearly going to add either Boston College or Syracuse. And I thought we should make a full-court press to be that school.’Shaw and Crouthamel chose not to.Instead, the two, along with University of Pittsburgh Chancellor Mark Nordenberg and then-University of West Virginia President David Hardesty Jr., worked to rebuild the Big East into the unbalanced yet formidable 16-team basketball superconference it became, Shaw said.Boston College, though, secretly pursued the path Bennett suggested for Syracuse and ultimately joined the ACC in October 2003.‘At the time we had no intent of leaving, at the time we were obsessed with putting the conference back together,’ Shaw said.Eight years later, though, Syracuse is in the ACC. The move was an ‘axiomatic’ one to Bennett. It was expected by Crouthamel, too.Still, it hurts the former athletic director. Crouthamel is the 73-year-old who birthed the Big East conference with his two Beta Theta Phi fraternity brothers at Dartmouth — the late Dave Gavitt and Frank Rienzo. Gavitt became the first commissioner of the Big East, and Rienzo is a former Georgetown athletic director. Gavitt passed on the same day — Sept. 16 — the world found out Syracuse was in talks with the ACC again.And even with the sudden news, both personally with the death of Gavitt and professionally with his former employer, Crouthamel doesn’t mind talking about what fell apart eight years ago. What once seemed inevitable then finally came to fruition now.‘I was not surprised at the recent news,’ Crouthamel said. ‘ … My question is why they didn’t do it before in 2003.’aolivero@syr.edu—Development Editor Kathleen Ronayne contributed reporting to this articlecenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more