first_imgtrevor lawrence celebrates a touchdown against louisvilleCLEMSON, SC – NOVEMBER 03: Trevor Lawrence #16 of the Clemson Tigers reacts after throwing a touchdown pass against the Louisville Cardinals during their game at Clemson Memorial Stadium on November 3, 2018 in Clemson, South Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)The 2018 college football season has only been over for a week and already the predictions for 2019 are flowing in.On Thursday, ESPN Staff Writer David Hale revealed his early picks for the 2019 All-America team and included a projection for the best quarterback in the nation.There are several elite options, from Tua Tagovailoa to Jalen Hurts to Justin Fields to Trevor Lawrence.ESPN’s choice?The Clemson quarterback.Sure, Lawrence didn’t even open 2018 as Clemson’s starter, and yes, (Tua) Tagovailoa, the Heisman runner-up, is back for Alabama in 2019. But here’s our firm rule on “way too early” All-Americans: If you, as a true freshman, throw for 347 yards and three touchdowns in a dominant national championship performance against your top competition for this honor, you get the nod. Sorry, Tua. Better luck next season.Lawrence is a sensible choice.In 2018, as a true freshman, Lawrence unseated incumbent starter Kelly Bryant early in the season and threw for 30 touchdowns – 10th in the FBS.His final stats for 2018 were 3,280 passing yards, a 65.1-percent completion rate, 157.2 passer rating, and only four interceptions in 15 games.Of course, the cherry on top for Lawrence was a 347-yard, four-touchdown performance in a 44-16 win over Alabama in the National Championship Game.Lawrence wasn’t the only member of the 2018 national champions to make Hale’s list.Also on the list were running back Travis Etienne, guard John Simpson, and defensive end Xavier Thomas.You can view ESPN’s full preseason All-American team here.last_img read more

first_img“It’s a double-edged sword – building solidarity through petitions is very important but I absolutely believe that in and of themselves they don’t lead very far,” she said. The proportion of people taking part in protests had doubled but remained small, at just 6 per cent. More than one in ten Londoners had taken part in a protest within the past year, the report added, and among Remain voters the proportion was also higher, at 9 per cent.  She said that it had become a panacea for people who want to engage with politics without the risk that comes with more traditional forms of activism, such as protesting on the streets.  The number of people signing online petitions has almost tripled as people turn to “clicktivism” to vent their frustration with politics. According to a study by the Charities Aid Foundation, the proportion of people who said they had filled out a petition within the past year increased from 21 per cent in 2015 to 56 per cent in 2016. The report suggested that disgruntlement with events such as Brexit might have driven more people to online activism. More than a third of respondents said they signed a petition during July – the highest for any month last year. The report suggested that this could be down to “the EU referendum vote towards the end of June and the spate of protest petitions following”.The majority of those signing petitions had been Remain voters, the study found, with 62 per cent saying they had done so in the past year compared to 45 per cent of Leave voters. The figures show that the proportion of people who had signed a petition in the past year was highest among young people. Almost two thirds of those aged 16 to 24 had done so, compared to less than half of over-65s. Dr Lina Dencik, co-director of the Data Justice Lab at Cardiff University, which examines the use of data in relation to political activism, said that petition-signing had replaced traditional activism in some areas. center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more