first_imgWould you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 TAGS: Connacht BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 20: Gavin Duffy of the Irish Rugby team during a fan session at Brothers Rugby Club, Albion on June 20, 2010 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images) RW: Anyone else?GD:  Mike McCarthy just has a different sense of humour. He’ll do fake falls, pretend to trip up and generally try to embarrass people in his company. He doesn’t get embarrassed himself, so it’s about embarrassing the people he’s with. You never want to walk into a room ahead of him. If you go into a shop or a cinema ahead of him, he’ll shout “Hello everybody!” from behind you and then disappear, so it looks like you said it and wanted to announce that you were there.RW: Are there any practical jokes you can tell us about?GD:  A lot of the boys live in Galway and around Halloween cars across the city belonging to members of the squad were egged. It clearly wasn’t a random attack, but no one owned up so we had an investigation! Only one or two cars hadn’t been egged, so that narrowed it down and there was payback. I won’t say who it was in case it flares up again, but it was pretty funny.RW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch?GD:  There was one instance when we were playing Rovigo in Italy and the referee called out a substitution, “Red six, red six, you’re off.” Mike McCarthy started to walk off the pitch and the referee said, “No, red six.” Mike looked down at his shirt and said, “Oh yeah, we’re playing in green today.” We’ve never worn red and the referee looked like he was thinking, ‘This is weird’. We know Mike tends to come out with stuff like that, but no one else gets it.RW: Who would be your three dream dinner-party guests?GD:  Homer Simpson, Will Ferrell and Frank Sinatra – he could get a sing-song going. RW: If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?GD:  We were talking about this the other day. On An Idiot Abroad, the guy (Karl Pilkington) came up with a good one. He wanted to be Bulls*** Man, so he could go anywhere at any time when someone was talking crap and shout ‘Bulls***’. And because he was a superhero it would be a fact that it was bulls***. I’d want to be invisible. Actually, I’d like to have a stunt double to do the contact work in training!RW: What would be your specialist subject on Mastermind?GD:  Gaelic Football in the 1990s. I still follow the sport now.RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby?GD:  Just a healthy and happy life. I’ve got a commerce degree and I’m finishing off a sports fitness and conditioning course, so it’s about looking at my options and keeping an eye open for opportunities.This article appeared in the October 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Two left feet: Gavin Duffy (centre) is not gifted in the dancing department The Connacht full-back has an off-the-wall chat with Sarah MockfordRUGBY WORLD:  First up, Gavin, do you have any nicknames?GAVIN DUFFY:  Just boring ones like Gavlar. At Harlequins, Mel Deane called me Crazy Legs because of my running style.RW: Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with?GD:  I’ll play it safe and say my wife and child, Sara and Jessica.RW: Do you have any party tricks?GD:  Singing badly and dancing badly – that’s it. I can definitely do both, but I do them badly.RW: What’s your guilty pleasure?GD:  A biscuit with a cup of tea – whatever’s going.RW: Do you have any bugbears?GD:  People who stand up to queue for a flight at the airport that isn’t even there yet.RW: Any phobias?GD:  Rucks!RW: What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought?GD:  Sunglasses. They don’t fit and just don’t work with my nose.RW: Who are the jokers at Connacht?GD:  Paul O’Donohoe does good impressions. He’s pretty sharp at picking up accents and he can do the players and management – no one’s safe. He’s got lads in early for training before by calling them up and doing an impression of one of the management.last_img read more

first_imgIt takes a rare technician to have Dan Cole struggling at scrum-time, but despite giving away a few kilograms to the Leicester Tiger, Domingo forced his opposite number to fold a couple of times – once earning the penalty that put France 16-3 ahead and into the driving seat.2. Richard Hibbard (Wales)He has to take some responsibility for his side’s pretty poor lineout, but Hibbard was one of very few Welshmen not to let their standards dive in an extremely underwhelming second half for the tournament champions. Tearing around the field felling runners by propelling himself at shin-height, the hooker was far from flat.3. Nicolas Mas (France)An 18-minute cameo almost saw Martin Moore sneak in here, but Mas prevails after derailing a number of England’s scrums in potentially profitable positions. Joe Marler may have made some Hollywood contributions around the park, but his 33 year-old adversary took the honours at the pivotal set-piece.4. Devin Toner (Ireland)Only topped by Brian O’Driscoll and Chris Henry on Ireland’s tackle-count, Toner was the go-to man at the lineout too, and combined with Rory Best to produce impeccable ball on five occasions. Given Ireland’s main weapon was the driving maul, this proved pivotal. The Leinsterman’s industry extended to the breakdown, where his lanky frame stunted Scotland’s go-forward regularly.5. Courtney Lawes (England)Stuart Lancaster will have breathed a significant sigh of relief upon hearing there was no structural damage to Lawes’ cheekbone and his magnificent lock will be fit to face Scotland. Lawes was forced off on Saturday, but not before laying down an outstanding 67 minutes in tandem with Joe Launchbury. Finally enjoying an injury-free spell, the Northampton Saint is mixing intelligent lineout calling with menacing athleticism. It’s an impressive cocktail.Secure all day: Devin Toner impressed at the lineout6. Yannick Nyanga (France)When punters start spouting nonsense about how they don’t rate Chris Robshaw as an international openside, you know an opposition back-rower has been phenomenal against England. Effervescent from start to cacophonous finish, Nyanga posed massive problems for Les Rosbifs. A fortnight after he helped slay Saracens, it was another tour de force encompassing rangy runs, limpet-like jackling and aerial authority in the lineout.7. Chris Henry (Ireland)Ulsterman Henry was never going to dismantle Scotland with an 80-minute monster truck impression as Sean O’Brien can, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t hugely effective alongside the splendid Peter O’Mahony. So often first to arrive at the ruck, he dictated the speed of ball for either side and also had a role at the heart of those destructive driving mauls before latching onto Dan Tuohy’s offload to lay on Rob Kearney’s try. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS during RBS Six Nations match between Ireland and Scotland at the Aviva Stadium on February 2, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. 8. Billy Vunipola (England)For a man who was considered unfit and carrying too much puppy fat as recently as September, Vunipola junior is hitting his stride quite nicely. Combining up his carries (17 for 68 metres) and tackles (nine), England’s prodigious No.8 totted up a contact every two-and-a-half minutes before leaving the fray on 65 minutes. Add in two try-scoring passes and you have something extremely special. Profiteer: Yoann Huget scored two opportunistic tries at the Stade de France, as Les Bleus stormed to a big leadBy Charlie Morgan15. Stuart Hogg (Scotland)Fellow Lion Rob Kearney bagged a try and an assist on his 50th Ireland appearance, but Hogg sparkled as Scotland were overturned in Dublin. Six beaten defenders highlighted his elusive footwork, while five offloads evidenced dexterity and willing to keep the ball alive. Also positioned himself intelligently to make a cover-tackle on Dave Kearney.14. Yoann Huget (France)A brace of tries is the statistic that defined Huget’s night and ultimately decided a wonderful Anglo-French encounter in Paris. Though neither required too much effort as favourable bounces foxed English defenders, the Toulouse wing demonstrated a predatory instinct and threatened throughout Saturday evening thanks to his innate opportunism. He had some problems shackling Mike Brown, but he will not be alone this tournament.Buck brace: Young centre Campagnaro scored twice13. Michele Campagnaro (Italy)Another to grab a double – first finishing a clinical counter before picking off Leigh Halfpenny’s pass for an interception score – Campagnaro personified Italy’s plucky performance at the Millennium Stadium. Just 20, he made seven tackles opposite Wales’ powerful centre pairing and often added his weight to the Azzuri’s disruptive breakdown play.12. Jamie Roberts (Wales)Eight carries in the first quarter of Wales’ difficult win over Italy settled Roberts back into Test rugby as the cornerstone of Warrenball. A ninth bust through the Italian line allowed him to release Scott Williams just before the break – a try the hosts desperately needed. There was some rust, but expect that to be shaken off over the Irish Sea.11. Mike Brown (England)When Jonny May broke his nose after only eight minutes at the Stade de France, Brown was shunted away from full-back, where he found truly world-beating form in November. It didn’t matter – the Harlequin brought the same spiky approach over to the wing and was once more England’s talisman thanks to some excellent broken-field attack. A muscular finish for his maiden Test try was the catalyst for the visitors’ fine comeback, too.10. Owen Farrell (England)With his team 16-3 down in a cauldron of noise and emotion, Farrell turned in a coming-of-age display of game-management that showcased a range of running and passing he had never previously managed to assert in a Test match. Neatly scanning the French line before slipping Billy Vunipola through for Luther Burrell’s try, he typified a new-found inclination to commit tacklers on the gainline – the final facet of his game that needed work.9. Edoardo Gori (Italy)At 23, Gori is hardly long in the tooth, but on his 30th cap his experience certainly helped shepherd his 20 year-old half-back partner Tommaso Allan on what could have been a chastening Six Nations debut in Cardiff. The Treviso scrum-half was calm and measured enough to incite some structure when Italy had possession and harried Mike Phillips well. He also aimed an enterprising cross-kick at Sergio Parisse that nearly resulted in the try of the weekend.Rarely stood still: Hibbard1. Thomas Domingo (France)last_img read more

first_imgAli Stokes runs the rule over those in the running for the wing and full-back slots in Eddie Jones’s squad for Japan LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The season may be nearly over but there is much still to play for.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. All smiles: Jonny May celebrates a try against France with Elliot Daly (Getty Images) center_img England’s back-three options for the Rugby World CupThe 13-month injury-enforced absence of Anthony Watson finally came to an end last Friday, with the British & Irish Lion fighting to place himself back into contention for one of the predicted five outside back slots in England’s 31-man World Cup squad.Once considered a nailed-on Test starter, Watson now faces the challenge of re-establishing himself as an absolute certainty in the Eddie Jones’s Japanese touring party post-injury – and he is not alone in this undertaking.Rugby World details England’s dead certs and maybe men out wide for Japan 2019…On the planeJack NowellThe cap fits: Jack Nowell breaks against Scotland (Getty Images)Exeter Chiefs’ first Lion, Nowell is one of our three outside backs guaranteed a trip to Japan. Capable at outside-centre, wing and full-back, the Cornishman packs a punch in attack and, crucially, mixes in with the best breakdown nauses.Jones’s throwaway statement that Nowell could play at openside for England highlights just how highly the Australian boss rates his skill-set.Elliot DalyTee time: Elliot Daly offers a goalkicking option (Getty Images)Whether you scoff at the idea of Daly at full-back or, like me, sit in awe of his all-round skill-set, the fact that he’s started the last 12 England games in the No 15 jersey indicates that Jones will take the soon-to-be Saracen to the World Cup.While the basics of defensive full-back play may have eluded him during his first few starts at 15, Daly has transformed England’s attack. Distributing in the last offensive wave and utilising his pace as an individual threat, England’s attack will flounder without Daly.Jonny MayAll a blur: Jonny May show his speed for England (Getty Images)Arguably England’s most improved player over the past half-decade, May has evolved from a simple speed merchant with a penchant for running in the wrong direction to England’s, and Leicester’s, most prolific try-scorer.But May’s innate ability to find the white line like a heat-seeking missile is not the only reason he is guaranteed a squad spot. The 29-year-old’s strength under the high ball is an immensely attractive trait, with Ben Youngs’s box-kicking game fundamental to any and all English success under Jones.May is the final outside back Jones trusts implicitly.Awaiting boarding callAnthony Watson Back in action: Anthony Watson on his return against Sale (Getty Images)Pre-injury, Watson would have been straight onto the plane alongside the aforementioned trio. However, the 25-year-old’s electric pace and dancing footwork were his key points of difference and two bouts of surgery to the Achilles tendon that plays a tremendous role in sprinting leaves a significant question mark next to Watson’s name.While the London Irish Academy product’s experience at full-back for England could swing a 50-50 vote in his favour, the uncertainty will remain until disproven.Watson’s challenge is simple, although by no means easy, get on the field for Bath and prove to everyone, including himself, he can pick up where he left off.Mike BrownFull stretch: Mike Brown scores against Clermont (Getty Images)The most capped full-back in England’s history, ‘Mr Angry’ has been fighting an uphill battle as of late. Brown is the most stable and secure full-back in the country, but England’s step towards a wider, multi-faceted attacking game at the end of 2018 saw the Harlequin fall from favour.Brown must continue to prove the attacking flair he has displayed for Quins this season is both consistent and reliable, ideally in a Premiership play-off.Joe CokanasigaAll hands on deck: Joe Cokanasiga shows his offload skills (Getty Images)He has been a revelation for England this season after bursting onto the scene last November. Cokanasiga is the only England winger in possession of a truly unique selling point: X-factor.The Bath winger’s size (6ft 4in and 19-plus stone), power, ability to offload like a Fijian Sevens star and sheer athleticism offers Jones a genuine game-breaker. Although an attractive asset, it is not necessarily the World Cup material Jones desires.For all his many attributes, Cokanasiga does not tick the box of full-back play Jones holds so dear. Going forward, his positional play and scrutiny under the high ball will mean the difference between watching the World Cup on his sofa or sampling sushi in Japan.Chris AshtonShark attack: Chris Ashton on the ball for Sale (Getty Images)The former rugby league man’s season-long stint as Toulon’s first-choice full-back and subsequent role in the Barbarians’ dismantling of an England’s XV last year were the sparks that reignited his Test status.But, the Sale Shark is going to have to nail his lines in defence and find the try-line a few more times during his final club games to strengthen his World Cup bid.last_img read more

first_imgTRY! A brilliant set piece from the line-out sees the Pumas take the lead against Tonga through Julian Montoya #ITVRugby #RWC2019 #ARGvTGA https://t.co/LsyBpFFrgG— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) September 28, 20193. Titi Lamositele (USA) The Saracens tighthead has played in plenty of big games over the past two seasons, and showed why at the World Cup. He held together a highly creditable USA scrum that could easily have crumbled after injury to the highly-rated young loosehead David Ainuu in the first minutes of the England game.4. Federico Ruzza (Italy) Ruzza has played for Italy for the past few seasons, but now appears to have firmly sealed his place after a string of rampaging performances. He seemed to pick out little pockets of space in the opposition forward line almost every other phase and was particularly impressive in the opening win over Namibia. That no-look pass Ruzza feeds Tebaldi in magical fashion for the scrum-half to score#ITVRugby #RWC2019 https://t.co/PIS1nQjTap— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) September 22, 20195. Guido Petti (Argentina) Pumas lock Petti has a turn of pace to make Beauden Barrett look on enviously, and his performances were a rare highlight for Argentina – especially when contrasted to the madness of his second-row partner Tomas Lavanini.6. Jamie Ritchie (Scotland) Playing slightly out of position at blindside is Scottish flanker Ritchie. His form ensured Scotland scarcely missed the talismanic openside Hamish Watson, as Ritchie’s play in a losing effort against Japan was the outstanding Scottish performance of the tournament.7. Tagir Gadzhiev (Russia) I have lost count of the times a commentator has told us that major European clubs should be looking at Gadzhiev, but he truly does deserve the hype. Coming to rugby late from an MMA background, the openside’s strength, carrying and penchant for nuisance have been a joy to watch. I don’t want to have to wait at least four years to see it again.8. Mamuka Gorgodze (Georgia) Coming out of international retirement for this tournament, his fourth World Cup, the back-row showed why he was justifiably a legend of European rugby. His try against Tonga was a suitably apt moment for him to say goodbye to Test rugby – again! Keep track of events in Japan via our Rugby World Cup homepage. Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Jacob Whitehead picks his dream team from the 12 countries who were knocked out after the pool stages Hard to stop: Fiji’s Semi Radradra on the attack against Wales (Getty Images) What a finish from Tuisova The Fiji wing batters through Biggar, Adams and Navidi to touch the ball down and give Fiji an early lead in Oita #WALvFIJ #RWC2019 #ITVRugby https://t.co/npYmgyUVpq— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) October 9, 201913. Semi Radradra (Fiji) If we had to pick a player of the tournament now it would be this man. Although Fiji’s World Cup didn’t go to plan, Radradra was unplayable at times, terrifying Wales for 80 minutes. In only four games he made 400 metres, beat 29 defenders and made eight clean breaks.He was on the wing for Fiji, but we’ve moved him closer to the action at outside-centre, where he has played a lot of his rugby. A simply sensational player.12. Siale Piatau (Tonga) The Tongan captain set up his country’s late score against France, before scoring himself a week later against the USA in his farewell to international rugby. He also made 42 tackles in the pool stages – the most of any inside-centre in the tournament.11. Jeff Hassler (Canada) Poor Canada had a tough tournament, compounded by their final game against Namibia being cancelled due to Typhoon Hagibis.However, one bright spark has been Hassler, who is a cult hero for Ospreys fans. He has outshone more established compatriot DTH van der Merwe and set up Canada’s consolation try against South Africa.10. Felipe Berchesi (Uruguay) It seems strange picking a pair of Uruguayan half-backs in a dream team, but Berchesi is the second leading point-scorer in the competition to date, behind only Japan’s Yu Tamura, and his game management is a large reason why los Teros triumphed over Fiji and ran Wales close.Big impact: Santiago Arata proved to be a livewire for Uruguay (Getty Images)9. Santiago Arata (Uruguay) At only 23 years old, Arata was one of the breakout stars of the World Cup. The scrum-half’s jack-in-the-box antics propelled Uruguay to victory over Fiji, and the force of his sidestep could see him find his way into Super Rugby in the near future.1. Mikheil Nariashvili (Georgia) Best XV Who Didn’t Make the World Cup Quarter-finalsThe pool stages of the 2019 Rugby World Cup have been and gone, and with it we sadly say goodbye to 12 teams and players who lit up the tournament.What would a dream team of players who failed to look the quarter-finals look like? Well, there would be a pack to rival most nations still in Japan and outside backs who could outsprint you, outstep you or simply flatten you. Take a look at this XV…15. Matteo Minozzi (Italy) Minozzi missed out on the Six Nations due to a knee injury, so it was a joy to see him fit and firing in Japan, hitting similar heights to those we saw when he burst onto the international scene in 2018.Italy’s key man as they dispatched Canada and Namibia, he was also a bright spark against South Africa in defeat. Possesses an incredible hitch-kick with which he can beat defenders from virtually a standing start.14. Josua Tuisova (Fiji)The player who has provided the finish of the tournament so far. Three minutes into Fiji’s game against Wales, he got the ball on the blindside direct from a scrum, he bounced Josh Adams, swerved Dan Biggar and dealt with a flying Josh Navidi to slam the ball down in the corner from an improbable angle. One of the only players in world rugby capable of such a feat. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The anchor of Georgia’s pack – long the best-performing scrum of the supposed ‘Tier Two’ nations – the Montpellier man had a stellar tournament and captained his country in the first match against Wales. His carrying in that game revitalised the Georgians in the second half, whilst he won vital penalties at the set-piece against Australia in the final pool match.2. Julian Montoya (Argentina) Beginning the tournament as Argentina’s second-choice hooker behind captain Agustin Creevy, Montoya propelled himself into the starting jersey for the crunch England match. The reason? His try-scoring form, as he first dragged Argentina back into the game against France, before scoring a rapid hat-trick against Tonga a week later.last_img read more

first_img Battlegrounds: What are the venues hosting Six Nations matches? (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sat 14 March, Wales v Scotland, Principality Stadium, BBC, 2.15pmStade de FranceFrance: Of the Six Nations stadiums, only Twickenham has more seats than the Stade de France (Getty Images)Capacity – 81,338Finished – 1998Uses – Football, rugby union, concerts, athleticsMatches –Sat 14 March, France v Ireland, BBC, 8pmStadio OlimpicoItaly: The Stadio Olimpico in Rome hosts Italian home games (Getty Images)Capacity – 62,698Finished – 1937Uses – Football, rugby union, athletics, concerts Matches –Sat 14 March, Italy v England, ITV, 4.45pm – Postponed due to the CoronavirusTwickenham StadiumEngland: Twickenham is an iconic stadium (Getty Images)Capacity – 82,000Finished – 1909Uses – American football, rugby union, concerts We give the lowdown on the six venues that will host matches during the 2021 Six Nations. center_img Six Nations VenuesThe 2021 Six Nations runs from Saturday 6 February to Saturday 20 March, with games played across Europe. This page has all you need to know about the six venues for the men’s tournament.Six Nations VenuesAviva StadiumIreland: The Aviva Stadium in all its glory (Getty Images)Capacity – 51,700Finished – 2010Uses – American football, rugby union, concertsMatches –Sat 7 March, Ireland v Italy, Aviva Stadium, ITV, 2.15pm – Postponed due to the CoronavirusBT MurrayfieldScotland: Murrayfield is an iconic rugby ground (Getty Images)Capacity – 67,144Finished – 1925Uses – American football, rugby union, football, concerts, rugby leagueMatches –Sun 8 March, Scotland v France, BT Murrayfield, BBC, 3pmPrincipality StadiumWales: Some huge moments have taken place in the Principality Stadium (Getty Images)Capacity – 74,500Finished – 1999Uses – Rugby union, rugby league, football, boxing, motor sports, eventing, concerts Matches – Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgThe Bath and England flanker gives his top tips on tackle technique Collapse Expand Star turn: Sam Underhill was a standout performer at RWC 2019 (Getty Images) Jake Polledri on how to be a top ball-carrier The leg drive“Show intent to win the collision. Lots of people go for big hits but don’t chase their feet. Big shoulder contacts can look awesome but it doesn’t mean it’s a good tackle;
 you need good leg drive to finish off the tackle. Ultimately you want to finish on top of them so you
 can get back into the game quicker than they can.”This article originally appeared in the April 2018 edition of Rugby World magazine. Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8 Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8 Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jake Polledri, the formidable Gloucester and Italy ball-carrier,… The England Women’s captain gives her tips for… The Wales lock gives his tips for getting… Jake Polledri on how to be a top ball-carrier Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout Sam Underhill: How to make a perfect tackleEver since he became a regular in the Ospreys team, Sam Underhill has caught the eye with his uncompromising tackles. He has taken that strength of his game to Bath and England, and was one of his country’s star performers at the 2019 World Cup when he performed such an effective partnership on the flanks with Tom Curry.Here he explains how to make a perfect tackle…The height“Stay as tall as you can for as long as you can – and pick an appropriate tackle height. If you drop your body height too early, the ball-carrier can move quicker than you; by staying tall you can move laterally and forward better, so have more time to react.”The feet“Make sure your feet are close to the ball-carrier and your lead foot should be the same as your lead shoulder – if you want to use your right shoulder, your right foot should be closest to the carrier. If your feet are too far away, you can’t generate force with a leg drive.”The head “Get your head on the right side and close to their body. Your body tends to follow your head; if your head is loose it’s easier for them to knock you away with a hand-off.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Nowell’s try was one of nine scored by the Chiefs in a one-sided match against Worcester. The league leaders picked a strong team for this fixture and showed their clinical edge throughout.On top of Nowell’s great finishing skills in the corner, two forwards scored hat-tricks for Exeter.Second-row Jonny Hill completed his in the first half. His first came following good interplay with Dave Ewers early on and then he crossed twice in the last five minutes of that opening period. His second try was from a short-range pick-and-go while for his third he was put away out wide by Nowell.Sam Simmonds scored two tries in the first half and added his third midway through the second period – all three coming from trademark Exeter moves. The first was from a lineout drive and the second two resulted from short-range tap-and-go penalties.Stuart Hogg and Jacques Vermeulen also notched tries for the Chiefs while Ashley Beck crossed for the Warriors late on. Clinical attack: Jack Nowell scored one of six first-half tries for Exeter (Getty Images) Watch: Jack Nowell’s brilliant finish against WorcesterJack Nowell scored an incredible try as Exeter thumped Worcester 59-7 in the Gallagher Premiership.The Chiefs wing, making his first start for the club since January, wrapped up the bonus point after half an hour with a brilliant finish in the corner.No 8 Sam Simmonds broke down the blindside from the back of a scrum inside the Warriors 22 and fed the ball to Nowell on the wing.The England player beat one Worcester defender, then showed his power to drive towards the corner despite the attentions of two tacklers and stretched over the line to score.It was referred to the TMO but replays showed he was in control of the ball when he grounded it and that he wasn’t in touch.You can watch Nowell’s incredible finish here… The winger marked his first Exeter start since January with a great trylast_img read more

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Consultative Council, By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 8, 2012 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL The Episcopal Church was represented at ACC-15 by, from left, the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Josephine Hicks of North Carolina and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut. They are shown here in their official portrait with Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams (center) outside of St. Mary’s Church in the precinct of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland. Photo/Anglican Communion News Service[Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] The 15th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council that concluded here Nov. 7 (local time) after 12 days was “remarkable,” according to the four Episcopal Church members of the council.The Episcopal Church was represented at the meeting by the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio, Josephine Hicks of North Carolina and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori attended the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here before the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.Hicks, whose term expired at the end of this meeting, is the longest-serving member, although Douglas has been present at four ACC meetings in various capacities. Hicks’ term began with the 2005 meeting in Nottingham, England when ACC members from the U.S.-based Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada attended as observers after both provinces voluntarily withdrew their participation in keeping with a request from the Anglican Primates — or principal archbishops — to allow space for consideration of sexuality issues.That first meeting, she told Episcopal News Service during an interview with all four Episcopal Church members before the end of the Auckland meeting, was “exceedingly tense and awkward, although it had its marvelous moments.”The 2009 gathering in Jamaica was “much more relaxed, a much better atmosphere but still a more contentious undertone which sometimes became more prevalent in really difficult issues” such as the Anglican Covenant, the 2004 Windsor Report and moratoria on authorization of same-gender blessings, consecrations of bishops living in same-gender relationships and cross-border interventions by bishops.“This meeting has felt very different and even more relaxed, even less contentious, even more of a feeling of congeniality,” Hicks said. “Everyone who was at Jamaica has commented that this meeting has felt more congenial, more positive [with] people clearly committed to the Anglican Communion regardless of positions on the covenant or any other issue.”Douglas agreed with Hicks. “Without question this ACC meeting has been the most conversational, the least politicized,” he said, calling the meeting that was held primarily in Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland  “a place of profound conversation in a way that I haven’t experienced it in the past.”“I found that we have been able to go much deeper in conversations around how our churches are so different one from another and also what holds us together as the communion itself,” he said. “It seems like a lot of the old animosities and divisions – differences are absolutely still there; I don’t want to paper over them – but all of the old tensions, I’m just not experiencing at this meeting.”The presiding bishop said that compared with the first two Primates Meetings she attended in 2007 and 2009 and the intervening 2008 Lambeth Conference, this second of the ACC meetings she has attended “is probably the Anglican Communion meeting that has the most demonstrated possibility for building ongoing, lasting relationships that I have seen.”She added that the most recent Primates Meeting in January 2011 “moved a long way in this direction but, this ACC meeting is profoundly reconciled in our diversity.”“It gives great evidence of [a] commitment to long-term ownership of the communion in the sense that people are involved and interested in making things work in our varied contexts,” Jefferts Schori said.For example, she said, the ACC committed to “take ownership” of the work of the communion’s official networks between meetings.For Jennings, attending her first ACC meeting, it was “a wonderful opportunity to build relationships, to learn more about the various provinces.”“We have had conversation about the fact that the ACC is the only instrument that has representation from bishops, priests and deacons, and laity,” she said. “There has been a call for more laity to be part of ACC and there’s been conversations about how that might be facilitated.”Those who came to ACC-15 who are not part of any of the other instruments of communion “consider it a great privilege to be representing their province and there’s a great deal of interest in how the different provinces are alike but, also how they’re dissimilar, so we continue to learn from one another,” she said.Hicks also noted the change in direction of the meeting’s attention.“I am delighted to say that the topics that got the most energy and passion at this meeting were … the kind of peace and justice issues we ought to be spending our time and energy focusing on,” she said.The issues, Hicks said, included the Bible in the Life of the Church project, advocating against persecution of Christians where they are minorities, advocating against and taking active steps to prevent gender-based violence, advocating for and taking specific steps to help preserve the environment.Douglas said the setting of the meeting was “very key to how we understand unity in all of our difference.”The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is a province “that’s been really working hard for decades on how do the three strands, the three cultural groups known as tikanga, live together in the fullness of what God is up to in these lands.”More information about that work is here.Douglas said he learned that for the province “it has been a hard struggle learning to live together in the fullness of the body of Christ.”“I think just being here, listening to the different languages, seeing the different peoples in the fullness of who they are and in the ongoing hard work of coming together has been a very important backdrop or foundation for all of our conversations – almost like a microcosm of the larger possibilities and challenges in the larger Anglican Communion.”Jennings also remarked on the communion’s efforts for deepening its unity in the midst of its diversity.“What I’ve been struck by at this meeting is that across the provinces there seems to be some appreciation – not just from North Americans, but throughout the Anglican Communion – that our unity is not based in uniform belief or practice. But, rather, our unity is in Jesus Christ and the things that we consider essential in terms of considering ourselves Anglicans,” she said. “This meeting, at least to this newcomer, seems to be much more interested, as Josephine said, around issues of our common life and how we can pursue God’s mission together and seek peace.”ACC members had “a remarkably creative, deep conversation about a variety of issues we all share,” according to Jefferts Schori.“This meeting has offered us the ability to learn from the differences that characterize the communion,” she said. “Western churches have talked about the challenges around retaining or attracting young people and enabling their leadership in the church and not simply restricting leadership to long-term older members. They’re realities that apply in Papua New Guinea as well as Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, in the United States, in the more ancient parts of the church.”“The newer parts of the church that are growing so rapidly struggle with basic resource issues, which some of our rural congregations struggle with so we have things to learn from the variations in our contexts that are all about how to present the gospel in a way that is attractive and healing for the people we are, set to proclaim the good news of Jesus.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET President of the House of Deputies, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Episcopal Church ACC members reflect on ‘congenial’ meeting NZ gathering a ‘place of profound conversation,’ attention to gospel Tags Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Executive Council, Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 1, 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal comenzó el 27 de febrero su parte en la campaña promocional a favor de la paz con justicia en el Oriente Medio correspondiente al trienio 2013-2015 de la Iglesia.El Consejo aprobó una resolución —mediante una votación de viva voz en la que dos miembros disintieron— afirmando lo que llamó “el testimonio profético” de la Convención General tal como se expresa en la Resolución B0 que los obispos y los diputados aprobaron en julio.La Resolución B019 reafirmó la política oficial de la Iglesia, basada en resoluciones aprobadas en convenciones anteriores, en que se apega a la solución de dos estados, en la cual un seguro y universalmente reconocido Estado de Israel conviva junta a un Estado libre, seguro y viable para el pueblo palestino, con Jerusalén como la capital compartida de ambos.También ratificó la inversión positiva “como un medio necesario de crear una economía sana y una infraestructura sostenible” en los Territorios Palestinos. Llamó a la Iglesia a apoyar “un estudio judío, musulmán y cristiano sobre la paz con justicia en el Oriente Medio” y a publicar una bibliografía anotada de los materiales disponibles sobre el tema.La Resolución B019 fue asignada al Comité de Promoción y Redes de Conexión (A&N, por su sigla en inglés), así como a la Comisión Permanente sobre Relaciones Anglicanas e Internacionales de Paz con Justicia, la Comisión Permanente sobre Relaciones Ecuménicas e Interreligiosas y el Comité de Teología de la Cámara de Obispos.Lelanda Lee, de la diócesis de Colorado y presidente del comité de A&N, le dijo a sus colegas al tiempo de proponer la resolución del Consejo, que era sólo la primera vez en que intervendrían en lo que ella llamó “el difícil asunto” del conflicto del Oriente Medio.La resolución del Consejo también:* “Ratifica y celebra” la reciente recomendación del Comité de Préstamos de Justicia Económica de invertir $500.000 en el Banco de Palestina. Esa decisión se tomó en respuesta al llamado de la [Resolución] B019 a “una inversión positiva como un medio necesario de crear una sana economía y una infraestructura sostenible en Cisjordania y la Franja de Gaza”. La resolución decía que la decisión es la primera de tales inversiones positivas hechas por la Iglesia Episcopal en la economía de los territorios palestinos ocupados, y la resolución insta a las diócesis y a otras entidades de la Iglesia “a considerar devotamente [el hacer] inversiones semejantes”.* Afirma que es la posición de la Iglesia participar en políticas constructivas de compromiso corporativo respecto al conflicto israelí-palestino adoptadas por el Consejo Ejecutivo en octubre de 2005 y aplicadas por su Comité sobre Responsabilidad Social Corporativa desde entonces.* Afirma que la Iglesia no apoya el boicot, la desinversión y las sanciones económicas contra el Estado de Israel ni ninguna aplicación de las políticas de compromiso corporativo de la Iglesia hacia ese fin.* Afirma que es la política de la Iglesia que toda ayuda extranjera dada por el gobierno de EE.UU. —incluida la ayuda a Israel y a la Autoridad Palestina— debe “rendírsele cuenta al pueblo estadounidense de manera completa y transparente y mantener las mismas normas de acatamiento con todas las leyes que se apliquen”, tal como ha abogado durante los últimos dos trienios mediante más de una docena de cartas enviadas al Congreso por la Obispa Primada y otros obispos de esta Iglesia y por la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales, e incorporadas en la “Declaración Religiosa sobre la Reforma a la Ayuda Extranjera”, adoptada por una coalición interreligiosa copresidida por la Iglesia Episcopal y que se ha comunicado en repetidas ocasiones con el Presidente y el Congreso en los años que median desde entonces.* Afirma que la política de responsabilidad con la ayuda extranjera “debe aplicarse, a través de tal [criterio] de promoción, con carácter universal en lugar de apegarse a una aplicación selectiva que se enfoque en la aplicación selectiva de algunos beneficiarios y no de otros”.* Y pide, además, que, a más tardar el 15 de marzo, se nombre un comité coordinador de la B019 para garantizar la aplicación efectiva y concienzuda de las políticas que la resolución promueve.La decisión del Consejo se produjo después de una extensa conversación en el A&N y la Misión Mundial, que incluyó la participación de la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori y de la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados.A mediados de enero la Red de Israel Palestina de la Fraternidad Episcopal de la Paz emitió lo que llamó “un desafío profético al Consejo Ejecutivo” en el cual presionaba al Consejo a intervenir en la aplicación de las políticas de la Iglesia en el conflicto israelí-palestino.Específicamente, los firmantes de la carta desafiaron al Consejo a “proceder rápidamente con la política del compromiso corporativo de nuestra Iglesia de manera que nuestros recursos económicos no se usen para apoyar la infraestructura de esta asfixiante ocupación”. En segundo lugar, le pide al Consejo que “le comunique inmediatamente al Congreso de EE.UU. que la Iglesia apoya una carta del 5 de octubre de 2012 enviada por 15 voces ecuménicas que pide “que Israel dé cuenta del uso de la ayuda extranjera que recibe de nuestro gobierno”.Jefferts Schori y Jennings dijeron en ese momento que la carta fue en extremo inútil e irrespetuosa de los procesos legislativos.Cierto número de personas firmó más tarde una “petición de apoyo” adjunta.Durante sus comentarios en la reunión del comité el 26 de febrero, Lee dijo que la resolución del Consejo surgió de su responsabilidad de aplicar las políticas de la Convención General y, especialmente, de responder a una resolución de la Convención dirigida al Consejo. Ella destacó que el comité había recibido la petición de la Red de Israel y Palestina y de una resolución de la convención de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte.Lee no le permitió a los representantes de la Red de Israel y Palestina hablar durante las reuniones del comité y tampoco se dirigieron al pleno del Consejo.Ella le informó al Consejo el 27 de febrero que su comité no había oído testimonios o comentarios de visitantes porque [el comité] había determinado que “ciertamente no somos la Convención General y no somos un comité legislativo que celebra audiencias legislativas; que no somos el lugar adecuado para que un grupo u otro grupo de representantes venga a hacernos presentaciones”. En lugar de eso, los miembros estuvimos conversando entre nosotros mismos como la junta directiva de la [Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera]”, afirmó.Las discusiones del comité incluyeron una presentación de Harry Van Buren, asesor de responsabilidad social corporativa del Consejo, quien explicó la manera en que el comité había sostenido un diálogo en el pasado con múltiples compañías cuyas actividades en los Territorios Palestinos ocupados algunos observadores habían considerado problemática. Van Buren también discutió las resoluciones accionarias que el comité ha iniciado o a las que se ha adherido por mandato del Consejo.Donna Hicks, convocante del Grupo de Acción Israel/Palestina de la Red del mismo nombre, y Newland Smith, miembro de la Red, asistieron a las reuniones de comités y a las sesiones plenarias del Consejo. Smith integró el comité de la Convención General que redactó la [Resolución] B019 y dijo que él objetaba esa resolución.Hicks dijo que estaba “desilusionada pero no sorprendida” por la resolución del Consejo “porque existe una tensión entre el modo en que [el liderazgo] de la Iglesia Episcopal ve [el problema] palestino-israelí y la manera en que varios de nosotros que somos más activistas vemos los problemas”.Ella dijo, por ejemplo, que el llamado de la B019 a la capacitación, la peregrinación y el diálogo interreligioso son parte de “ese modo de funcionar a retazos”, pero que ella no tiene muchas esperanzas en esas actividades.“No veo cómo eso va ayudar a ponerle fin a la ocupación y para mí eso es la clave”, afirmó.Smith dijo que él deseaba que la resolución del Consejo hubiera respondido directamente al reto que le había presentado su grupo.Él y Hicks “nos hemos sentido realmente aislados” durante la reunión de tres días del Consejo y él esperaba que futuras conversaciones “serían verdaderamente abiertas y que todo sería bien recibido en la mesa”.Hicks dijo que durante este trienio la Iglesia debería alentar esas peregrinaciones a Israel y Palestina que “le muestren a las personas el lado político de las cosas”. Agregó que ella esperaba que la Iglesia apoyaría específicamente las peregrinaciones de jóvenes, de personas de color y de aquellos que no han estado en el Oriente Medio. La capacitación, el diálogo interreligioso y la elaboración de material bibliográfico deben alentarse en aquellos que se interesen en esas actividades, afirmó Hicks.Para los que queremos asumir una posición de mayor activismo, “yo invitaría a la Iglesia a que no tratara de silenciarnos y de cerrarnos”, añadió.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.Traducido por Vicente Echerri Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Executive Council February 2013 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH El Consejo Ejecutivo reanuda su promoción de la paz en el Oriente Medio La resolución responde al rumbo establecido por la Convención General Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Servicelast_img read more

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [2] http://www.oecn.episcopaldioceseoregon.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/oecn_spring_2012.pdf Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 25, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ethnic Ministries, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [1] Likely either 23 or 24 June Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service – Burlingame, California] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preached June 23 during the Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries @ 40 closing Eucharist at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco.The text of her sermon follows.Episcopal Asiamerica Ministry 40th Anniversary23 June 2013Grace Cathedral, San FranciscoThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchThe nations have gathered, and streamed in to this city set on a hill – there are supposedly 7 hills here, and this is almost certainly the highest one with a church! – the nations have come up to the house of the Lord with great rejoicing.  It is exceedingly fitting to celebrate 40 years of Asiamerica ministry in this church, in this city, in this part of God’s creation.Anglicans first worshipped on these shores on this date in 1579,[1] when Sir Francis Drake’s crew came ashore to pray just north of here.  Those prayers were led by Chaplain Francis Fletcher, and some Native Americans apparently stood and watched the gathering.  The ancestors of those Native Americans came here from Asia thousands of years before.North America’s first Anglican worship in Chinese took place just east of here in Nevada Territory, in the early 1870s, and grew into a ministry that lasted until the ore played out and the miners and railway builders moved on or were expelled.  Japanese-Americans gathered to pray up and down this coast until they were removed to internment camps during WWII.  Winston Ching, born 70 years ago today, is a saint of this church forged in the aftermath of that era.At least from the early 19th century, Americans began to take this faith tradition with them as they traveled the world, through mercantile empires, military invasions, and overtly missionary activity – to Hawai’i, the Philippines, China, Japan, Korea, and beyond.  Our first missionary bishop for overseas work was William Jones Boone, sent to work in Shanghai in 1837, and consecrated in 1844.  He worked there until his death in 1874, translating the prayer book and parts of the Bible.  The second overseas missionary bishop, Horatio Southgate, was also consecrated in 1844, and sent to the other end of Asia as Bishop of Constantinople.The interchange has always been in both directions, from this continent to Asia, and from Asia here.  This complex history includes the witness of Father Hisanori Kano, who came to Nebraska as an agriculturalist and became a powerful and prophetic pastor, and Paul Rusch, who migrated in the other direction to found an agricultural station in Kiyosato and build lasting relationships between these two nations.Migration here followed the end of each war in the Pacific, as well as including those fleeing conflict.  Refugees have come from Viet Nam, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and economic and political migrants from China, Hong Kong, Korea, the Philippines, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.  Today we have among us thriving Hmong and Karen congregations, as well as growing numbers of people with roots in South Asia.  People have found in The Episcopal Church a place to worship, a community to help them settle in a new land, safe harbor from the larger society’s discrimination (although that discrimination has been abundant even within this Church), and partners in building a society of greater justice that looks more like the Reign of God.This Church’s history of interaction with Asia and with Asian-Americans, like the history of all human and sacred communities, is a mixture of holy witness, prejudice and exclusion, solidarity, and all sorts and conditions of charity and mission work.  We have not yet told the whole truth or fully reconciled that history.  This celebration is a sacramental recognition that God continues to bring forth light out of darkness, wholeness from destruction, and new life from death.Migration and border-crossing is part of that cosmic movement.  The wisdom teacher in Ecclesiasticus insists that those who seek God are travelers, looking for what is good and what is not so good, and testing what they find in the people they meet.  God willing, out of that comes understanding, and they become wise teachers of others.  That is an image of the city set on a hill, toward which the nations stream, seeking God and God’s wisdom.The Jesus road is the same kind of traveling Sirach encourages – going into the world, looking for the presence of God and discerning the activity of God’s spirit already at work.  His followers take up their crosses and lose their self-centered lives, moving from one way of life to a new one.  That kind of border crossing brings abundant challenges, but it is the only route to abundant life.  Every person who has migrated knows something of those challenges.  Jesus offers us an example of cosmic migration, as God enters foreign flesh and continues to bless it.  God named that flesh good at the beginning – we’re the ones who misuse it or close off the possibility of blessing we received at creation.  We will not find the reign of God if we’re unwilling to migrate down the road and across the barriers that separate us from God-with-us in those we too often call alien, foreign, or other.  Those others are also part of God’s body, and our own ultimate healing depends on discovering that they are part of us, we are part of them, and we are all part of the same whole.Those wisdom teachers and seekers after God are a very significant part of our journey to this place.  We would not be here today without the witness of others who have picked up their cross and walked, swum, and sailed across borders.  The Ven. Lincoln Eng was one of those powerful witnesses.Archdeacon Eng helped to found EAM, having been a member and chair of its predecessor, EAST (Episcopal Asian-American Strategies Taskforce).  He was born in Seattle, the oldest of 12 children of Chinese immigrants.  He had TB as a young man, and spent time in hospital, and then stuck around to help with the nursing.  He was disenchanted with the Chinese Baptist Church he’d grown up in and learned about the Episcopal Church from a friend.  He was soon baptized and confirmed.  Eventually he came here to study at CDSP.  He started his field work at the Chinese congregation in Oakland but didn’t speak good enough Cantonese to fit in, so he finished his field work at St. Clement’s in Berkeley.  When he graduated the bishop sent him to an African-American congregation in Seattle, and then later to a Japanese-American parish.  He reportedly told the bishop, “I’m Chinese, you know.”  The bishop sent him there because the members wanted him to work with young people.  His work on integration in the Seattle school system had him reminding Spanish teachers that the Latinos they worked with spoke a version of the language that was just as dignified as the Castilian they were pushing.  He worked to integrate the trade unions, which wouldn’t admit blacks or Asians.  When he was 50, he moved across the river to the Diocese of Oregon, where he served as rector of a big suburban congregation outside Portland and then as Archdeacon of the diocese.[2]After he “retired” he continued to serve as an interim.  The first one was in the congregation where I’d agreed to serve a second year as senior warden just before the rector announced he was leaving.  That priest had had a very hard time with the old guard who much preferred the style of his long-term predecessor.  Lincoln arrived and started loving and challenging everybody to move to a new place, down the road from where they’d been, closer to something that looked less like a kindergarten sandbox and more like the Reign of God.  He also told stories about what it had been like to grow up a Chinese kid in Seattle in the 20s and 30s.  They weren’t pretty stories, but they were always about what it’s like to cross borders and tear down dividing walls.That is what EAM is all about, whether it’s first or second or third or a later wave.  We are not yet permanent residents of the kingdom of God, but we do know the direction in which it lies.  That road will take us through a lot of dyings, and it will also yield abundant life.  Some of that dying involves reconciling the wounds of the past, and addressing the injustice and alienation of the present, and some of it is simply about getting out of our own too-comfortable places and states of mind.  New and abundant life awaits those who are willing to pick up and cross over.  There is a reason why we call this cross-cultural ministry – if it is faithful it is about the culture of the cross.  Walk on, my friends.  That is the way to the kingdom! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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