first_img Enforcing more data collection was not the way to improve employment opportunities for ethnic minority women, the CBI said last week. A report by the Equal Opportunities Commission found that Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean women faced significantly greater penalties than white women in the workplace. The report recommended “practical” solutions to tackle the problem, including finding out and publishing the facts about the number of black and Asian women working at an organisation and at what level. But CBI deputy director-general John Cridland said obliging employers to collect more data about staff would not in itself achieve a more diverse workforce. “It would only take the focus away from those actions that help encourage more ethnic minority women in the workplace,” he said. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development warned that adopting “policing legislation” would not help businesses understand the benefits of diversity. “Organisations should not simply focus on increasing diversity, but learn how to manage it better. This requires more than minimal legal compliance,” it said. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. CBI claims data-driven diversity will fail to deliverOn 20 Mar 2007 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

first_imgMarch 19, 2019 /Sports News – Local Toolson lifts Utah Valley over CS Northridge 92-84 in CBI Written by Tags: College Basketball Invitational/Jake Toolson/UVU Wolverines Basketball UVU advances to play in the CBI quarterfinals against the winner of Stony Brook and South Florida, which play Wednesday night. The quarterfinals are Monday, March 25. Lamine Diane had 27 points for the Matadors (13-21). Terrell Gomez added 22 points. Elijah Harkless had 13 points.center_img Baylee Steele had 19 points for Utah Valley (25-9). Richard Harward added 15 points. Isaiah White had 15 points for the hosts. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOREM, Utah (AP) — Jake Toolson had 21 points as Utah Valley beat Cal State Northridge 92-84 in the first round of the College Basketball Invitational on Tuesday night. Associated Presslast_img read more

first_img Written by January 16, 2021 /Sports News – Local Weber State’s 22 3s buries NCCAA-level Yellowstone Christian FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOGDEN, Utah (AP) — Darweshi Hunter had 17 points off the bench to carry Weber State to a 124-44 win over Yellowstone Christian.TJ Rivera led the Centurions with 17 points.The Wildcats set a program record with 22 3-pointers (in 33 attempts). Weber State finished 47 for 69 (68.1%) and had 15 players enter the scoring column. Tags: Weber State Wildcats Basketball Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgA spokesperson for the University said, ‘The ‘only one black student at Oxford’ story is a misleading one from last year, and refers specifically to ONLY [sic] UK undergraduates of black Caribbean descent who gave us information about their ethnicity – NOT all black students, or even all black undergraduates.‘The full picture tells a different story: in 2009 27 black British undergraduate students got a place at Oxford, as did 14 of mixed backgrounds including black heritage.’However, Downing Street stood by Cameron’s comments: ‘The wider point he was making was that it was not acceptable for universities such as Oxford to have so few students coming from black and ethnic minority groups.’This media storm has provoked mixed reactions among Oxford students. Ayo Ajanaku, a third year medic and former OULC Co-Chair, said that he found the figure that only one black student was admitted in 2009 ‘not a disgrace in itself, but deeply alarming’.He said, ‘The overwhelming implication is that scores of young people are being denied the opportunity to achieve standards expected by leading universities, and therefore to contribute their full potential to society. This sledgehammer to social mobility for Britain’s disadvantaged is truly shameful.’Ajanaku felt that the statistic on which Cameron was commenting on was ‘patently misleading’ but that it did point to some underlying issues.’The underrepresentation of black people is inextricably linked to the underrepresentation of poorer households more generally. Black people are more likely to have a lower socioeconomic status than their white counterparts. There is an onus on the university to encourage more able black students to apply, and to constantly review the transparency and fairness of the admissions process.’Alex Bulfin, OUSU VP for Access and Academic Affairs, noted that the blame for social inequalities cannot be pinned solely on Oxford.Bulfin asked, ‘Why doesn’t David Cameron find it ‘disgraceful’ that in 2009 only 452 black students in the whole country achieved AAA at A-level, compared to 29,000 white students? Or that black students and their families are disproportionately more likely to come from the lowest socio-economic groups? In seeking a convenient scapegoat, Cameron, Clegg and Lammy are willfully ignoring the deeper issues that are at play in our society.’The oft quoted ‘one black student’ statistic came about as a result of a Freedom of Information request, put forward by the Labour MP David Lammy in November 2009.Bulfin said that far from helping the issues of access at Oxford, the manner that such statistics are being ‘flung around by politicians’ is ‘frankly dangerous and irresponsible’.He continued, ‘There’s no question in my mind that every time the press or politicians target these sorts of comments at Oxford, they make our job of widening access and participation in HE just that extra bit harder. When these stories first started circulating earlier in the year, we immediately noticed more prospective students expressing concern about whether they would fit in at Oxford if they were from a minority background.‘I think it’s clear that pushing these sorts of messages is all about scoring PR points and pointing the finger; if politicians were serious about access to university for students then they wouldn’t have scrapped AimHigher earlier this year.’ This media storm has provoked mixed reactions among Oxford students. Ayo Ajanaku, a third year medic and former OULC Co-Chair, said that he found the figure that only one black student was admitted in 2009 ‘not a disgrace in itself, but deeply alarming’.He said, ‘The overwhelming implication is that scores of young people are being denied the opportunity to achieve standards expected by leading universities, and therefore to contribute their full potential to society. This sledgehammer to social mobility for Britain’s disadvantaged is truly shameful.’Ajanaku felt that the statistic on which Cameron was commenting on was ‘patently misleading’ but that it did point to some underlying issues.‘The underrepresentation of black people is inextricably linked to the underrepresentation of poorer households more generally. Black people are more likely to have a lower socioeconomic status than their white counterparts. There is an onus on the university to encourage more able black students to apply, and to constantly review the transparency and fairness of the admissions process.’Alex Bulfin, OUSU VP for Access and Academic Affairs, noted that the blame for social inequalities cannot be pinned solely on Oxford.Bulfin asked, ‘Why doesn’t David Cameron find it ‘disgraceful’ that in 2009 only 452 black students in the whole country achieved AAA at A-level, compared to 29,000 white students? Or that black students and their families are disproportionately more likely to come from the lowest socio-economic groups? In seeking a convenient scapegoat, Cameron, Clegg and Lammy are willfully ignoring the deeper issues that are at play in our society.’ The oft quoted ‘one black student’ statistic came about as a result of a Freedom of Information request, put forward by the Labour MP David Lammy in November 2009.Bulfin said that far from helping the issues of access at Oxford, the manner that such statistics are being ‘flung around by politicians’ is ‘frankly dangerous and irresponsible’.He continued, ‘There’s no question in my mind that every time the press or politicians target these sorts of comments at Oxford, they make our job of widening access and participation in HE just that extra bit harder. When these stories first started circulating earlier in the year, we immediately noticed more prospective students expressing concern about whether they would fit in at Oxford if they were from a minority background.‘I think it’s clear that pushing these sorts of messages is all about scoring PR points and pointing the finger; if politicians were serious about access to university for students then they wouldn’t have scrapped AimHigher earlier this year.’Cameron spoke out on Monday 11th April, during a local election campaign visit to Harrogate, North Yorkshire. He said, ‘I saw figures the other day that showed that only one black person went to Oxford last year. I think that is disgraceful, we have got to do better than that.’The University quickly hit back, claiming that the figure on which Cameron was commenting is ‘incorrect and highly misleading’.Oxford clarified that the statistic is misleading, as it only refers to UK undergraduates of black Caribbean origin for a single year of entry, so is not representative of all Oxford’s students.The University added that in 2009, Oxford admitted 41 UK undergraduates with black backgrounds, and that year 22% of Oxford’s total student population came from ethnic minority backgrounds.center_img Downing Street refused to back down last night, as they continue to defend Cameron’s denouncement of Oxford as ‘disgraceful’ based on the figures which reveal just one black student won a place to study at Oxford in 2009.Cameron spoke out on Monday 11th April, during a local election campaign visit to Harrogate, North Yorkshire. He said, ‘I saw figures the other day that showed that only one black person went to Oxford last year. I think that is disgraceful, we have got to do better than that.’The University quickly hit back, claiming that the figure on which Cameron was commenting is ‘incorrect and highly misleading’.Oxford clarified that the statistic is misleading, as it only refers to UK undergraduates of black Caribbean origin for a single year of entry, so is not representative of all Oxford’s students.The University added that in 2009, Oxford admitted 41 UK undergraduates with black backgrounds, and that year 22% of Oxford’s total student population came from ethnic minority backgrounds.A spokesperson for the University said, ‘The ‘only one black student at Oxford’ story is a misleading one from last year, and refers specifically to ONLY [sic] UK undergraduates of black Caribbean descent who gave us information about their ethnicity – NOT all black students, or even all black undergraduates.‘The full picture tells a different story: in 2009 27 black British undergraduate students got a place at Oxford, as did 14 of mixed backgrounds including black heritage.’However, Downing Street stood by Cameron’s comments: ‘The wider point he was making was that it was not acceptable for universities such as Oxford to have so few students coming from black and ethnic minority groups.’This media storm has provoked mixed reactions among Oxford students. Ayo Ajanaku, a third year medic and former OULC Co-Chair, said that he found the figure that only one black student was admitted in 2009 ‘not a disgrace in itself, but deeply alarming’.He said, ‘The overwhelming implication is that scores of young people are being denied the opportunity to achieve standards expected by leading universities, and therefore to contribute their full potential to society. This sledgehammer to social mobility for Britain’s disadvantaged is truly shameful.’Ajanaku felt that the statistic on which Cameron was commenting on was ‘patently misleading’ but that it did point to some underlying issues.‘The underrepresentation of black people is inextricably linked to the underrepresentation of poorer households more generally. Black people are more likely to have a lower socioeconomic status than their white counterparts. There is an onus on the university to encourage more able black students to apply, and to constantly review the transparency and fairness of the admissions process.’Alex Bulfin, OUSU VP for Access and Academic Affairs, noted that the blame for social inequalities cannot be pinned solely on Oxford.Bulfin asked, ‘Why doesn’t David Cameron find it ‘disgraceful’ that in 2009 only 452 black students in the whole country achieved AAA at A-level, compared to 29,000 white students? Or that black students and their families are disproportionately more likely to come from the lowest socio-economic groups? In seeking a convenient scapegoat, Cameron, Clegg and Lammy are willfully ignoring the deeper issues that are at play in our society.’The oft quoted ‘one black student’ statistic came about as a result of a Freedom of Information request, put forward by the Labour MP David Lammy in November 2009.Bulfin said that far from helping the issues of access at Oxford, the manner that such statistics are being ‘flung around by politicians’ is ‘frankly dangerous and irresponsible’.He continued, ‘There’s no question in my mind that every time the press or politicians target these sorts of comments at Oxford, they make our job of widening access and participation in HE just that extra bit harder. When these stories first started circulating earlier in the year, we immediately noticed more prospective students expressing concern about whether they would fit in at Oxford if they were from a minority background.‘I think it’s clear that pushing these sorts of messages is all about scoring PR points and pointing the finger; if politicians were serious about access to university for students then they wouldn’t have scrapped AimHigher earlier this year.’Cameron spoke out on Monday 11th April, during a local election campaign visit to Harrogate, North Yorkshire. He said, ‘I saw figures the other day that showed that only one black person went to Oxford last year. I think that is disgraceful, we have got to do better than that.’The University quickly hit back, claiming that the figure on which Cameron was commenting is ‘incorrect and highly misleading’.Oxford clarified that the statistic is misleading, as it only refers to UK undergraduates of black Caribbean origin for a single year of entry, so is not representative of all Oxford’s students.The University added that in 2009, Oxford admitted 41 UK undergraduates with black backgrounds, and that year 22% of Oxford’s total student population came from ethnic minority backgrounds.A spokesperson for the University said, ‘The ‘only one black student at Oxford’ story is a misleading one from last year, and refers specifically to ONLY [sic] UK undergraduates of black Caribbean descent who gave us information about their ethnicity – NOT all black students, or even all black undergraduates.‘The full picture tells a different story: in 2009 27 black British undergraduate students got a place at Oxford, as did 14 of mixed backgrounds including black heritage.’However, Downing Street stood by Cameron’s comments: ‘The wider point he was making was that it was not acceptable for universities such as Oxford to have so few students coming from black and ethnic minority groups.’This media storm has provoked mixed reactions among Oxford students. Ayo Ajanaku, a third year medic and former OULC Co-Chair, said that he found the figure that only one black student was admitted in 2009 ‘not a disgrace in itself, but deeply alarming’.He said, ‘The overwhelming implication is that scores of young people are being denied the opportunity to achieve standards expected by leading universities, and therefore to contribute their full potential to society. This sledgehammer to social mobility for Britain’s disadvantaged is truly shameful.’Ajanaku felt that the statistic on which Cameron was commenting on was ‘patently misleading’ but that it did point to some underlying issues.‘The underrepresentation of black people is inextricably linked to the underrepresentation of poorer households more generally. Black people are more likely to have a lower socioeconomic status than their white counterparts. There is an onus on the university to encourage more able black students to apply, and to constantly review the transparency and fairness of the admissions process.’Alex Bulfin, OUSU VP for Access and Academic Affairs, noted that the blame for social inequalities cannot be pinned solely on Oxford.Bulfin asked, ‘Why doesn’t David Cameron find it ‘disgraceful’ that in 2009 only 452 black students in the whole country achieved AAA at A-level, compared to 29,000 white students? Or that black students and their families are disproportionately more likely to come from the lowest socio-economic groups? In seeking a convenient scapegoat, Cameron, Clegg and Lammy are willfully ignoring the deeper issues that are at play in our society.’The oft quoted ‘one black student’ statistic came about as a result of a Freedom of Information request, put forward by the Labour MP David Lammy in November 2009.Bulfin said that far from helping the issues of access at Oxford, the manner that such statistics are being ‘flung around by politicians’ is ‘frankly dangerous and irresponsible’.He continued, ‘There’s no question in my mind that every time the press or politicians target these sorts of comments at Oxford, they make our job of widening access and participation in HE just that extra bit harder. When these stories first started circulating earlier in the year, we immediately noticed more prospective students expressing concern about whether they would fit in at Oxford if they were from a minority background.‘I think it’s clear that pushing these sorts of messages is all about scoring PR points and pointing the finger; if politicians were serious about access to university for students then they wouldn’t have scrapped AimHigher earlier this year.’Downing Street refused to back down last night, as they continue to defend Cameron’s denouncement of Oxford as ‘disgraceful’ based on the figures which reveal just one black student won a place to study at Oxford in 2009.Cameron spoke out on Monday 11th April, during a local election campaign visit to Harrogate, North Yorkshire. He said, ‘I saw figures the other day that showed that only one black person went to Oxford last year. I think that is disgraceful, we have got to do better than that.’The University quickly hit back, claiming that the figure on which Cameron was commenting is ‘incorrect and highly misleading’.Oxford clarified that the statistic is misleading, as it only refers to UK undergraduates of black Caribbean origin for a single year of entry, so is not representative of all Oxford’s students.The University added that in 2009, Oxford admitted 41 UK undergraduates with black backgrounds, and that year 22% of Oxford’s total student population came from ethnic minority backgrounds.A spokesperson for the University said, ‘The ‘only one black student at Oxford’ story is a misleading one from last year, and refers specifically to ONLY [sic] UK undergraduates of black Caribbean descent who gave us information about their ethnicity – NOT all black students, or even all black undergraduates.‘The full picture tells a different story: in 2009 27 black British undergraduate students got a place at Oxford, as did 14 of mixed backgrounds including black heritage.’However, Downing Street stood by Cameron’s comments: ‘The wider point he was making was that it was not acceptable for universities such as Oxford to have so few students coming from black and ethnic minority groups.’last_img read more

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr United Educational Credit Union’s Mad City Money program helps high schoolers learn how to budget.by: Karen BankstonYour household budget is precarious but balanced. You’ve found affordable housing and a low-rate loan for a reliable used car. Just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, joyful, budget-breaking news arrives. Twins?That type of scenario drove home the challenges of making ends meet for about 80 students participating in a “Mad City Money” financial simulation co-hosted by $118 million, 14,300-member United Educational Credit Union, Battle Creek, Mich.In the simulation, marketed by the Credit Union National Association, students receive packets that assign jobs, salaries and family circumstances. They move from booth to booth, which are manned by adult “salespeople,” to shop for housing, transportation, furnishings and other necessities and extras. Along the way, they receive messages from the “Fickle Finger of Fate” delivering unexpected news to break or boost their budgets.“The key to the success of this learning experience is absolutely the hands-on element, plus some chaos and student/adult interaction mixed in,” says Joan Miller, executive assistant/marketing for United Educational CU. “In most cases, the adults at the various booths were there to sell, not necessarily guide the students to the most sensible option, just like they might encounter in real life. The CU booth was different, however, as it was the place to seek help, along with handling financial transactions.” continue reading »last_img read more

first_imgSeems like everywhere you turn, someone is bashing financial institutions for something. They’re not innovative enough, their customer service is lousy, or they’re the scourge of the earth and the single root cause of all of society’s ills (OK, so that’s just one man’s views).I heard about a study that fintech vendor Pega conducted from tweets suggesting FI’s customer service capabilities were lacking and in need of improvement.After seeing the results, I didn’t come to the same conclusion. In fact–based on the data–I concluded that not only is bank customer service just fine, but that banks have no need to innovate, and no reason to mention the word “omnichannel” ever again.What Service Factors are Important to Banking Consumers?According to the study, the three most important service factors are 1) Listening to and understanding my needs; 2) A representative with a courteous, patient and/or friendly attitude; and 3) Responding to inquiries in a timely/responsive fashion. continue reading » 25SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

first_imgSteve WebbGoing with the first option would be unusual, said Webb, adding that because of the government’s majority (80) in the House of Commons, “it can be confident of winning most votes in the Commons, especially on relatively technical matters, so it may be tempted to reject all amendments at this stage”.Peers would then have to decide whether to vote against the government a second time, or to give some ground on some of the issues, he said.Altmann said she hoped the government would not try to reverse any of the changes to the bill introduced by peers on Tuesday night.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here. Ros AltmannIn his reaction to this week’s vote, Steve Webb, pensions minister in the 2010-15 coalition government and now a partner at actuarial consultancy LCP, honed in on the extent of the government defeats.“It is unusual for the government to be defeated so many times on what has until now been seen largely as a non-controversial piece of legislation,” he said. “This suggested that they have misjudged the mood on some of these issues and have failed to listen.”Asked about his views on the substance of the defeat-representing amendments, he told IPE he very much supported the spirit of the amendment on open DB schemes.Other amendments passed by peers on Tuesday night, in defeats for the government, relate to pension dashboards and new collective defined contribution (CDC) pensions.Altmann said the amendments would “make further improvements to the new pensions landscape”.With regard to the dashboard, peers voted that any commercial dashboards should not be allowed to enter the market until a publicly run dashboard had been operational for a year, and that dashboards should not be allowed to carry out transactions – the transfer or consolidation of funds.On CDC, the amendment that was introduced on Tuesday night would require that trustees of such schemes report on the fairness of the scheme to all members.LCP’s Webb told IPE he thought it was right that dashboards not have transaction capability, but that he was “less convinced” about the other dashboard-related amendment.“It’s the private sector that will innovate with modelling tools etc., and if they are going to be allowed at all, it seems odd to make them wait,” he said.And on the CDC amendment, he said he doubted it would make much difference as trustees had to have regard to the interests of all scheme members in any case.What next?When the House of Lords completes its consideration of the draft occupational pensions legislation it will pass to MPs in the House of Commons, who will consider the bill line-by-line.According to Webb, for each defeat, the government will have three options:Accept the amendments in full;Offer an alternative amendment that would seek to address some of the issues of concern; orReject the amendments and send the bill back to the Lords unamended. “Unlike schemes which have already closed, some of these largest schemes, with millions of members still paying contributions, have plenty of money coming in each year, which, together with the returns on their investments, do not pose the threat of insolvency or illiquidity which apply to closed schemes which are shrinking over time,” said Altmann.center_img The House of Lords voted in favour of a separate regulatory approach being taken to open defined benefit (DB) schemes in one of four government defeats on provisions in the Pension Schemes Bill on Tuesday night.According to commentators, the passing of the amendment related to open DC schemes addressed the risk they would be forced to de-risk prematurely, increasing costs and leading to more closures.Ros Altmann, former pensions minister under the Conservative government from 2015 until 2016, said the original wording of the Bill contained risks that the pensions regulator might require open DB schemes – in the minority but of which over 1,000 remain – to sell higher-returning assets and switch to lower-return bonds.“Such an overly cautious approach would see pension contributions increase to unaffordable levels,” she said, giving the example of the Railways Pension Scheme or the Universities Superannuation Scheme as among many others that relied on long-term investment returns to help meet pension costs and grow their funds over time.last_img read more

first_imgHannah Jolynn Clark, age 2 years and 11 months, of Dillsboro, Indiana, passed away Thursday, August 3, 2017 at Children’s Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.Hannah was born September 1, 2017 in Marion, OH to Zane and Jessica (Ward) Brady. Hannah was a typical little girl living life to the fullest, playing with all her friends and doing all the things little girls do. Her death is felt very deeply and she will be sadly missed.She is survived by her mom and dad; her siblings Kayden, Avery, Nevaeh and Zoey; her Grandma and Grandpa Lawrence and Stacy Ward; Aunt Eby Brady and Uncle Ian Robling.A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 3pm in the Covered Bridge Park, right off Highway 1 in Guilford, IN.Meyers Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.last_img read more

first_imgORVC Weekly Report (December 17 – January 5)Players of the Week.Girls Basketball: Mariah Day – Jac-Cen-DelBoys Basketball: Matthew Williams – SouthwesternORVC Report(December 17-January 5)2018-19Courtesy of ORVC Recorder Travis Calvert.last_img

first_imgRowing, Canoeing and Sailing Sports Coaches drawn from across the country are currently in the classrooms where they spent the Christmas holidays receiving tutorials for the second face of the Nigeria Rowing, Canoeing and sailing Federation’s NOC/IOC Solidarity Coaching course holding at the Naval Sailing Club, Ojo, Lagos.The programme began on 23, December 2016 and will last till December 30, 2016 and was packaged by the Nigeria Olympic Committee (NOC) in conjunction with the International Olympic(IOC), the course which is being conducted by Rachel Davis, an expert from Canada is a follow up to the first phase held in April this year as facilitated by Sallie Malt from the United Kingdom who was accompanied by two other UK water experts to scout out conducive places for the development of Nigeria water sports. Commenting on the initiative, President NOC, Habu Gumel, who was represented by the Secretary General, Babatunde Popoola said the ongoing course is part of the NOC’s pre-arranged “Train the Trainers programme aimed at repositioning Nigerian sports for good.Adding that the present administration of the NOC under the leadership of Gumel is determined to take Nigeria’s sports to greater heights, hence the quick follow up of the Rowing, Canoeing and Sailing Sports coaching Course.Drawn from across the country, the 10 beneficiaries who are attending having passed the first course include, Olagunju Adebola Sunday, Egbele Babajide Omoh, Oshikolu Oreoluwa, Aweh Dennis Simon, Showetan Olalekan, Taibu Adebayo Ahmed, College Emmanuel, Ajao Ayo Adeyinka, Ogunbiyi Ayo Olaide and Momodu Ayo who is attending as an observer completes the list if attendees.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more